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BUSINESS
August 21, 2012 | By David Lazarus
If you can't beat 'em, drown 'em in petty attacks. Conservatives fought long and hard to block creation of a Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, which the Obama administration said was needed to safeguard people from abusive credit card and mortgage lenders. Now that the watchdog agency is up and running, conservatives have found a new line of attack: How the bureau spends its money . Judicial Watch, a conservative foundation, says the agency has been spending a surprising amount of taxpayer money on -- oh my God!
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NEWS
July 6, 2013 | By Kari Howard
One of my desert island discs would be “Pet Sounds” by the Beach Boys. I could probably listen to the last 53 seconds of “God Only Knows” forever - those soaring harmonies piling on top of each other and that crazy clip-clopping percussion. But my favorite track is the deceptively simple “Wouldn't It Be Nice.” The song has a touching cameo in one of this week's Great Reads, about gay and lesbian seniors finally getting the prom dates of their dreams. In this sweet story of boy-meets-boy, girl-meets-girl, the Beach Boys song floats over the loudspeaker at the dance.
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TRAVEL
September 10, 1995
Your sampling of "Sign Language," collected by world travelers and published in the Travelin' Woman newsletter ("News, Tips & Bargains," July 23) was most amusing. But let's give credit where it is due. The original list of signs was collected and published by linguist Richard Lederer in his book, "Anguished English." The compilation has been copied and reprinted--usually uncredited--ever since. As editor of Crystal Harmony's daily newsletter, I included portions of Lederer's list almost daily, always to the delight of passengers.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2013 | By Irene Lacher
Russell Harvard plays the deaf brother in a dysfunctional family in "Tribes" at the Mark Taper Forum through April 14. The Austin, Texas-based actor, who won a Drama League Award for the role off-Broadway, will move with the production to the La Jolla Playhouse from June 25 through July 21. He spoke in his Taper dressing room. FULL COVERAGE: 2013 Spring arts preview Do you feel sympathetic to your character, who feels marginalized because he's deaf? I do, but not with my family.
NEWS
October 30, 1991 | SYBIL BAKER
You never owned an apartment building? You've saved yourself a lotta trouble. Rent control, light bulbs. But that comes later. First, what color do you paint the place? And what do you call it? Loved ones come to mind. So you're looking at these palm trees in San Gabriel, flanking the sign, and little Cyndi used to wear her hair in braids as a kid. Bingo. Cynthia Palms. This type of apartment-namer, they're the homebodies.
NATIONAL
March 21, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
After 23 years of work, Council Bluffs-based Deaf Missions ministry has finished translating the New Testament into American Sign Language. Translators appear on camera, signing the New Testament's 7,959 verses. The translation is expected to be available on DVD and videotape this summer. Organizers said ASL is the language used by many deaf people.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1995 | DAVID E. BRADY
Reaching out to families with hearing-impaired children, the Los Angeles Public Library will offer three storytelling sessions with sign language interpreters at San Fernando Valley branches in the next several weeks. "This is the first organized attempt to do a preschool story hour with an interpreter," said Anne Connor, a coordinator with the Children's Services Department. She said that interpreters had attended library events on a sporadic basis in the past.
NEWS
March 9, 1989 | JAN HOFMANN, Jan Hofmann is a regular contributor to Orange County Life.
Quick--what's the opposite of east? No, it's not west. It's Orange. The opposite of Los Angeles? Not New York. It's Riverside, just as the opposite of San Diego is Long Beach. Don't believe me? Just check out the freeway signs. It's all right there in green and white. It's enough to make you wonder sometimes if our roads were actually manufactured in Taiwan and shipped over here with a set of instructions that bear an uncanny resemblance to English: Exit must lane right.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 2000
William C. Stokoe Jr., 80, a linguistics professor whose work brought worldwide acceptance to sign language for deaf students. Stokoe, who taught at Gallaudet University in Washington, is credited with winning recognition of American Sign Language as a genuine language, overcoming the contentions of linguists that it was little more than a rudimentary imitation of the spoken word.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1995 | SARAH KLEIN
The city is offering an elementary sign language course for children 9 to 12 years old. Sponsored by the Community Services Department, the six-week class will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays from 4 to 5 p.m. at Deerfield Community Park, beginning Jan. 9. The registration fee, $30 a student, is due Jan. 8. Information: (714) 724-6610.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
In the intellectually raucous British household of Nina Raine's "Tribes," family members don't so much talk as assault each other with monologues. The dinner table cacophony consists of scraps of debate, ironic jabs, aesthetic proclamations, academic gobbledygook, politically incorrect polemics and insults both sophisticated and juvenile. With everyone boisterously holding forth as though the fate of the Western world rested upon their tongue, it's no surprise that listening is a negligible activity - an elective course no one has bothered to sign up for. FULL COVERAGE: 2013 Spring arts preview Raine, a rising English playwright who trained as a director, turns up the volume on the chatter so that we can more fully appreciate the sound of silence.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2013 | By Taffy Brodesser-Akner
In the play "Tribes," a young deaf man with a boisterous, hearing family learns something from a new girlfriend that his parents and siblings never bothered to teach him: how to sign. He had always been expected to keep up with them by reading lips. That man, a woman slowly going deaf and a family that willfully doesn't learn sign language: Playwright Nina Raine explores the role of sound in the lives of these characters not just with the words, the director and the actors but the sound and projection directors.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin, Los Angeles Times
On a chilly morning at Santa Clarita Studios, the cast and crew of ABC Family's "Switched at Birth" are about to tape a scene at an outdoor carwash. It is not quiet on the set. A creaky cart rattles past. Rubber cables swoosh as they're dragged along the concrete. A hiss comes from the hot-coffee dispenser at craft services. In the distance, a car engine starts up. The collective sprightly chatter of milling crew members rises, then falls as a call for calm goes out. The director, in a North Face jacket and wool cap, shouts, "Action!"
BUSINESS
August 21, 2012 | By David Lazarus
If you can't beat 'em, drown 'em in petty attacks. Conservatives fought long and hard to block creation of a Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, which the Obama administration said was needed to safeguard people from abusive credit card and mortgage lenders. Now that the watchdog agency is up and running, conservatives have found a new line of attack: How the bureau spends its money . Judicial Watch, a conservative foundation, says the agency has been spending a surprising amount of taxpayer money on -- oh my God!
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2012 | By Yvonne Villarreal, Los Angeles Times
There's a world out there where a finger of ice can destroy everything in its path. Where strobes of green light dance across the sunless sky. Where unicorn-like creatures roam the sea. And it's not the stuff of CGI-loaded blockbuster fantasy film. It's "Frozen Planet, "a seven-part Discovery Channel and BBC mega-series exploring the Earth's arcane polar regions. (It premiered last week, but its first installment will repeat Sunday just before the second episode.) Made by the documentary team behind 2006's groundbreaking "Planet Earth" and narrated by Alec Baldwin, "Frozen Planet" is epic in scope and cinematic in execution, demonstrating how far nature documentary series have come.
NEWS
November 3, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Doctors, researchers, therapists and the general public should reconsider their biases against people with autism, according to a psychiatrist/neuroscientist who studies the disorder. You may not think you are biased against autistics, but you probably are, writes Dr. Laurent Mottron of the University of Montreal in Thursday's edition of the journal Nature . After all, he was too - and he's an expert in the field. Like most people, if he found a difference between autistic people and members of the general population, he assumed the gap represented some sort of defect - even when there was no evidence to suggest that it was. Many of his colleagues continue to think this way, Mottron writes: “For instance, researchers performing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2011 | By Allan M. Jalon, Special to the Los Angeles Times
An 18th century novel doesn't seem like an obvious inspiration for a documentary about a chimpanzee in a modern scientific experiment, but that's part of what influenced James Marsh when he made "Project Nim. " Like Henry Fielding's sprawling epic, "Tom Jones," Marsh says, his film about a charismatic primate who learns to use sign language "holds up a mirror" to the world around his protagonist. That mirror is not always flattering to the well-heeled bohemians, student idealists and researchers who came into Nim Chimpsky's orbit starting in the 1970s.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2011 | By Rick Rojas, Los Angeles Times
His isn't a household name. But if you know who Academy Award-winning actress Marlee Matlin is — if you've seen her on "Ellen" or caught a recent episode of "Celebrity Apprentice" — you're likely to recognize Jack Jason: He's the short man with close-cropped hair, lending his voice to her words. He stands at her side at movie premieres and shares the stage with her on talk shows. When Matlin won the Oscar in 1987 for her role in "Children of a Lesser God," it was his emotive voice adding sound to the young deaf actress' signs of appreciation.
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