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Signal Bolsa Corp

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1985
Your recent article on Bolsa Chica reflects the excellent spirit of volunteers who assist in the cleanup of trash in the wetlands area. Unfortunately, you misrepresented the plans for development and expansion of the wildlife reserve. As owners of most of the Bolsa Chica property, Signal Bolsa Corp. is cooperating with the County of Orange, the state Department of Fish and Game, the Coastal Conservancy and other regulatory agencies on plans that will expand the Bolsa Chica wildlife reserve from its present 150 acres of restored marshland to more than 900 acres of functioning coastal marsh.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2001 | STANLEY ALLISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Huntington Beach City Council voted late Monday to seek funding to purchase the Bolsa Chica mesa, beginning a process that could ultimately preserve a majestic bluff overlooking the largest protected wetland area in Southern California. The measure passed 4 to 3, despite concerns by several council members that crucial questions were not addressed, including whether the owner, Signal Landmark, is willing to sell the 183-acre property.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1995
The Board of Supervisors approved the Bolsa Chica plan in 1994. Since that time, it has become even more important to our economic well-being to move forward with the Bolsa Chica plan. With the county bankruptcy, the Disney Wescot project scaled back, and El Toro's future still very uncertain, Orange County desperately needs a large project to stimulate our economy. I live near Bolsa Chica and I know these wetlands are terribly degraded. I support this project because it will restore the Bolsa Chica, one of the largest remaining coastal wetlands in California, without the use of taxpayer dollars.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1995
The Board of Supervisors approved the Bolsa Chica plan in 1994. Since that time, it has become even more important to our economic well-being to move forward with the Bolsa Chica plan. With the county bankruptcy, the Disney Wescot project scaled back, and El Toro's future still very uncertain, Orange County desperately needs a large project to stimulate our economy. I live near Bolsa Chica and I know these wetlands are terribly degraded. I support this project because it will restore the Bolsa Chica, one of the largest remaining coastal wetlands in California, without the use of taxpayer dollars.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2001 | STANLEY ALLISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Huntington Beach City Council voted late Monday to seek funding to purchase the Bolsa Chica mesa, beginning a process that could ultimately preserve a majestic bluff overlooking the largest protected wetland area in Southern California. The measure passed 4 to 3, despite concerns by several council members that crucial questions were not addressed, including whether the owner, Signal Landmark, is willing to sell the 183-acre property.
NEWS
December 27, 1992 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal and state officials have lambasted the environmental plan for a proposed 5,000-home development at Bolsa Chica, warning that it is erroneous, deficient and in dire need of an overhaul. One U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service manager called it the worst environmental impact report he has seen in 15 years on the job. "There are so many places where it is misleading or inadequate," said Jack Fancher, who supervises wetlands issues in Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1988
1970: Signal Bolsa Corp. acquires 1,200 acres of Bolsa Chica from former owners. March 15, 1973: Signal Landmark and the state sign a settlement agreement in which the state acquires title to a 300-acre parcel in the Bolsa Chica wetlands. 1978: The state builds a levee, enclosing 150 acres of its 300-acre parcel. Seawater once again pours into Bolsa Chica, restoring a portion of the damaged wetlands.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2001 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Huntington Beach on Wednesday appeared ready to try buying the long controversial Bolsa Chica mesa and preserve it from development. Four of the city's seven council members said they supported the idea in concept. Mayor Pam Julien Houchen said she would submit a motion at Monday's meeting to start negotiations with landowner Signal Landmark and seek federal, state and local funding. "It's everyone's goal to have as much open space as possible," Julien Houchen said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2001 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Orange County Superior Court commissioner indicated Friday that he will probably order the Amigos de Bolsa Chica to enter arbitration with Bolsa Chica landowner Signal Landmark to see if the environmental group violated a settlement agreement. A formal ruling is expected next week. The company asked for arbitration in late February, saying its longtime environmental foe had violated the terms of a confidential 1989 lawsuit settlement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1993
Perhaps it only seems as if the decision-making process for a planned housing development in Huntington Beach's Bolsa Chica area is taking almost as long as Nature herself took to fashion prehistoric wetlands on a portion of the acreage. Now the response of four agencies--all with vital interests in wetlands--to environmental reports prepared for the coastal development promises to extend the process even longer.
NEWS
December 27, 1992 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal and state officials have lambasted the environmental plan for a proposed 5,000-home development at Bolsa Chica, warning that it is erroneous, deficient and in dire need of an overhaul. One U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service manager called it the worst environmental impact report he has seen in 15 years on the job. "There are so many places where it is misleading or inadequate," said Jack Fancher, who supervises wetlands issues in Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1985
Your recent article on Bolsa Chica reflects the excellent spirit of volunteers who assist in the cleanup of trash in the wetlands area. Unfortunately, you misrepresented the plans for development and expansion of the wildlife reserve. As owners of most of the Bolsa Chica property, Signal Bolsa Corp. is cooperating with the County of Orange, the state Department of Fish and Game, the Coastal Conservancy and other regulatory agencies on plans that will expand the Bolsa Chica wildlife reserve from its present 150 acres of restored marshland to more than 900 acres of functioning coastal marsh.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1987
Here is a chronology of events affecting the Bolsa Chica wetlands in recent--and not so recent--history. Thousands of years ago--Gabrielina Indians live on the bluffs overlooking Bolsa Gap. The lowlands consist of a broad, shallow bay or estuary bordered by fresh and saltwater marshes. Freeman Creek, which originated in what is now Westminster, flows through the gap before emptying into the Pacific.
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