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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1989
The Grad Night Committee at Huntington Beach High School has received a $5,000 donation from Signal Landmark to help the school launch its first graduation night party on June 15. The company, which has extensive real estate holdings in the city, earlier this year adopted the high school under a school-business "partnership" arrangement. The Signal Landmark gift is the largest single donation that has come to the Grad Night Committee, according to Pat Will, co-chairman of the committee.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 2001
Re "A Big Step for Bolsa Chica," Nov. 25: The editorial accurately reflected the history of and proceedings on the restoration of the Bolsa Chica wetlands and thoughtfully focused on the issues of concern to our community. As you pointed out, the California Coastal Commission imposed strict water quality monitoring and remediation requirements on the project. Because no urban runoff will flow into the wetlands from Orange County flood-control channels, that usual source of beach contamination will be eliminated.
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BUSINESS
November 26, 1985 | BILL RITTER, San Diego County Business Editor
Signal Landmark Properties Inc., a major developer in Orange County and throughout Southern California, is one of the companies that has been spun off by Allied-Signal to form a new $2.4-billion corporation. The old Signal Co.'s development arm, Signal Landmark currently is involved in at least 30 residential and commercial projects throughout the region's five major counties. The projects include community development, residential, commercial and industrial development and land management.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2001
Re "Coastal Panel is Upheld," Aug. 26: The California Coastal Commission barred Signal Landmark from overbuilding on the environmentally sensitive Bolsa Chica mesa. Signal appealed the ruling, saying the commission had unlawfully taken the land. The article said Superior Court Judge Sheridan Reed agreed with the commission's decision on how much of the mesa could be developed without harming the wetlands--65 acres. Signal will probably try another appeal, crying it's not fair to protect our coastline at their expense.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1987
Letter writer Jan Vandersloot (Sept. 6) again misses the mark in his carping about the Signal Landmark plan for the largest wetlands restoration project ever attempted on the West Coast. He misunderstands state Sen. Marian Bergeson's legislation, SB 1517, that would form a Bolsa bay harbor and conservation district to provide a bonding and federal funding repayment mechanism. Signal Landmark as the principal property owner at Bolsa Chica is investing millions of dollars in environmental assurances to expand the Bolsa Chica wetlands restoration area by three times its existing size.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 1985 | Robert Hanley \f7
An ongoing rent dispute between some residents of Newport Shores in Newport Beach and Signal Landmark Inc., which owns the property on which their homes sit, will be settled through arbitration, a Superior Court judge ruled Wednesday. Judge Judith Ryan granted Signal Landmark's petition asking the court to compel the approximately 200 homeowners leasing their land to submit to arbitration. Ryan ordered both parties to select arbitrators within 10 days.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1987
I commend state Sen. Marian Bergeson (R-Newport Beach) for her withdrawing, albeit temporarily, SB 1517, the Bolsa Chica bill. This measure clearly deserves further study and ultimate rejection. One has only to know the recent past to see that Signal Landmark would not make a good government at Bolsa Chica. In 1984, Signal was embroiled in a dispute in Newport Shores when the company tried to force a 20-times increase in rent upon the people who leased their land from Signal. A judge decided the fair increase was six-times the current rent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1986 | JOHN SPANO, Times Staff Writer
Living a block from the beach got a bit more expensive Monday for about 200 residents of Newport Beach. Monthly rent jumped from about $25 to an average of $145 per lot, guaranteed through 1999. Residents were pleased with their victory Monday after a long court battle with La Jolla-based Signal Landmark Inc., owner of the 31-acre Newport Shores area in west Newport Beach. "I'm really excited," said Ninfa Jarvis O'Brien, one of the homeowners.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2001
Re your editorial "Momentum on Bolsa Chica," March 25: While it was good to see The Times giving so much attention to Bolsa Chica, it certainly would help if those in Sacramento who hold the purse strings on the $2.1 billion of Proposition 12 park-bond money would look to the south. So far, the money has traveled overwhelmingly to areas in the north. Take for instance: Chico, 2,000 acres; Mendocino, 71 acres; Mount Diablo, 1,300; Cambria, 417; Sonoma, 532; Calistoga, 525--and this is not a complete list.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1987
A covey of dismaying comment has arisen in The Times and among Sen. Marian Bergeson watchers, and they're barking up the right tree. But vainly. They've been decrying Sen. Bergeson's whisperings with Signal Landmark Inc. on the matter of its destruction of Bolsa Chica wetlands. But the senator doesn't listen. Sen. Bergeson, affectionately known by the development industry as "Our Marian," has been batting out bill after bill for this and that developer, oblivious to industry's greed for profit off the land.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2001
Re your editorial "Momentum on Bolsa Chica," March 25: While it was good to see The Times giving so much attention to Bolsa Chica, it certainly would help if those in Sacramento who hold the purse strings on the $2.1 billion of Proposition 12 park-bond money would look to the south. So far, the money has traveled overwhelmingly to areas in the north. Take for instance: Chico, 2,000 acres; Mendocino, 71 acres; Mount Diablo, 1,300; Cambria, 417; Sonoma, 532; Calistoga, 525--and this is not a complete list.
BUSINESS
September 20, 1990 | MICHAEL FLAGG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The president and chief executive of developer Signal Landmark said Tuesday that he has resigned to start a consulting firm after Signal's parent company hired an outside firm to oversee Signal's operations. Peter B. Denniston, 38, joined Irvine-based Signal Landmark a little more than two years ago. But parent company Henley Properties Inc. in June hired The Koll Co., a Newport Beach developer, to manage its buildings and development projects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1989
The Grad Night Committee at Huntington Beach High School has received a $5,000 donation from Signal Landmark to help the school launch its first graduation night party on June 15. The company, which has extensive real estate holdings in the city, earlier this year adopted the high school under a school-business "partnership" arrangement. The Signal Landmark gift is the largest single donation that has come to the Grad Night Committee, according to Pat Will, co-chairman of the committee.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1987
Letter writer Jan Vandersloot (Sept. 6) again misses the mark in his carping about the Signal Landmark plan for the largest wetlands restoration project ever attempted on the West Coast. He misunderstands state Sen. Marian Bergeson's legislation, SB 1517, that would form a Bolsa bay harbor and conservation district to provide a bonding and federal funding repayment mechanism. Signal Landmark as the principal property owner at Bolsa Chica is investing millions of dollars in environmental assurances to expand the Bolsa Chica wetlands restoration area by three times its existing size.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1987
I commend state Sen. Marian Bergeson (R-Newport Beach) for her withdrawing, albeit temporarily, SB 1517, the Bolsa Chica bill. This measure clearly deserves further study and ultimate rejection. One has only to know the recent past to see that Signal Landmark would not make a good government at Bolsa Chica. In 1984, Signal was embroiled in a dispute in Newport Shores when the company tried to force a 20-times increase in rent upon the people who leased their land from Signal. A judge decided the fair increase was six-times the current rent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1987
A covey of dismaying comment has arisen in The Times and among Sen. Marian Bergeson watchers, and they're barking up the right tree. But vainly. They've been decrying Sen. Bergeson's whisperings with Signal Landmark Inc. on the matter of its destruction of Bolsa Chica wetlands. But the senator doesn't listen. Sen. Bergeson, affectionately known by the development industry as "Our Marian," has been batting out bill after bill for this and that developer, oblivious to industry's greed for profit off the land.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1987
State Sen. Marian Bergeson's Bolsa Chica bill (SB 1517) misses the mark on many points, in addition to those raised by The Times editorial (May 10). This bill basically represents a vehicle to give a risk-free federal handout to a private developer, Signal Landmark Inc., and it puts responsibility for restoration of the wetlands to the same private developer, which has been fighting tooth and nail against restoration of the Bolsa Chica wetlands for years. This bill essentially puts the proverbial fox in charge of the henhouse, and uses federal funds to do it, to the tune of $89 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2001
Re "Coastal Panel is Upheld," Aug. 26: The California Coastal Commission barred Signal Landmark from overbuilding on the environmentally sensitive Bolsa Chica mesa. Signal appealed the ruling, saying the commission had unlawfully taken the land. The article said Superior Court Judge Sheridan Reed agreed with the commission's decision on how much of the mesa could be developed without harming the wetlands--65 acres. Signal will probably try another appeal, crying it's not fair to protect our coastline at their expense.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1987
State Sen. Marian Bergeson's Bolsa Chica bill (SB 1517) misses the mark on many points, in addition to those raised by The Times editorial (May 10). This bill basically represents a vehicle to give a risk-free federal handout to a private developer, Signal Landmark Inc., and it puts responsibility for restoration of the wetlands to the same private developer, which has been fighting tooth and nail against restoration of the Bolsa Chica wetlands for years. This bill essentially puts the proverbial fox in charge of the henhouse, and uses federal funds to do it, to the tune of $89 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1986 | JOHN SPANO, Times Staff Writer
Living a block from the beach got a bit more expensive Monday for about 200 residents of Newport Beach. Monthly rent jumped from about $25 to an average of $145 per lot, guaranteed through 1999. Residents were pleased with their victory Monday after a long court battle with La Jolla-based Signal Landmark Inc., owner of the 31-acre Newport Shores area in west Newport Beach. "I'm really excited," said Ninfa Jarvis O'Brien, one of the homeowners.
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