Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSignal Landmark Corp
IN THE NEWS

Signal Landmark Corp

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 23, 1989
In an attempt to conclude a 15-year dispute over the Bolsa Chica wetlands, a coalition of preservationists, developers and local officials Monday adopted a plan that will preserve at least 1,000 acres of wetlands and significantly limit development on the scenic coastal strip near Huntington Beach. Members of the Bolsa Chica Planning Coalition, formed six months ago by Orange County Supervisor Harriet Wieder, called the plan a breakthrough and said its final approval by various federal, state and local agencies was virtually assured.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2001 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Orange County Superior Court commissioner indicated Friday that he will probably order the Amigos de Bolsa Chica to enter arbitration with Bolsa Chica landowner Signal Landmark to see if the environmental group violated a settlement agreement. A formal ruling is expected next week. The company asked for arbitration in late February, saying its longtime environmental foe had violated the terms of a confidential 1989 lawsuit settlement.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1989
Major developers, with their money and political clout, have the reputation in Orange County of being able to build virtually anything they want anywhere they want it. But that is not always true. In areas that are the most environmentally sensitive, like Upper Newport Bay and the Bolsa Chica Wetlands, the protective instincts of residents are aroused. And although success does not come quickly or easily, conservation and common sense have prevailed. The latest victory came Monday with the disclosure that, after nearly 20 years of conflict, a compromise had indeed been agreed upon between the property owner--Signal Landmark Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2001 | STANLEY ALLISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Huntington Beach City Council voted late Monday to seek funding to purchase the Bolsa Chica mesa, beginning a process that could ultimately preserve a majestic bluff overlooking the largest protected wetland area in Southern California. The measure passed 4 to 3, despite concerns by several council members that crucial questions were not addressed, including whether the owner, Signal Landmark, is willing to sell the 183-acre property.
NEWS
May 23, 1989 | CARLA RIVERA, Times Staff Writer
In a move that may end the 15-year battle over the Bolsa Chica wetlands, a coalition of preservationists, developers and local officials Monday adopted a broad plan that will restore at least 1,000 acres of wetlands and significantly limit development on the scenic coastal strip near Huntington Beach. The agreement, seen as a major environmental victory, will eventually provide Orange County with one of the largest restored wetland preserves in the state. Members of the Bolsa Chica Planning Coalition, formed only 6 months ago by Supervisor Harriett M. Wieder, hailed the plan as a breakthrough and said its passage through various federal, state and local agencies for final approval was virtually assured.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1989 | ROSE ELLEN O'CONNOR
A delegation of preservationists, developers and local officials hope to get their first hint next week of whether federal regulators are likely to go along with a compromise to end 15 years of fighting over the Bolsa Chica wetlands. The coalition reached a broad agreement last May for restoring 1,000 acres of coastal saltwater marsh near Huntington Beach and, at the same time, permitting construction of thousands of homes along the environmentally sensitive coastline.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1989 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Officials of two federal agencies that will judge a plan for limited development of the Bolsa Chica wetlands said Tuesday that they were impressed by the complex environmental compromise worked out by public officials, preservationists and the developer. But the officials declined to specifically endorse the proposal, noting that the formal permit-application process had not yet begun.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 1989 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, Times Staff Writer
A Superior Court judge, rejecting claims by a group of Newport Beach homeowners that their homes were built on shaky ground, effectively ordered them Tuesday to pay five years' worth of back rent totaling about $450,000. Judge Eileen C. Moore refused to grant a request from 63 Newport Shores homeowners that would have blocked Signal Landmark Co., which owns the lots on which their homes are built, from collecting the past-due rent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1990
Voting unanimously, the City Council on Monday night launched a move that will ultimately annex the 1,635-acre Bolsa Chica area to the city. The council adopted a schedule of environmental hearings and other procedures that must be conducted before annexation can occur by 1991. The council's action concludes about 20 years of debate within the city on whether to annex Bolsa Chica.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2001 | STANLEY ALLISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Huntington Beach City Council voted late Monday to seek funding to purchase the Bolsa Chica mesa, beginning a process that could ultimately preserve a majestic bluff overlooking the largest protected wetland area in Southern California. The measure passed 4 to 3, despite concerns by several council members that crucial questions were not addressed, including whether the owner, Signal Landmark, is willing to sell the 183-acre property.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2001 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The tortured tale of Bolsa Chica took another twist Friday, when the owner and would-be developer sued the California Coastal Commission, alleging that the agency illegally "took" the property by so severely restricting what could be built that development was no longer economically feasible. Bolsa Chica, between Seal Beach and Huntington Beach, boasts the largest wetlands complex in Southern California and is a key stopover for migrating birds on the Pacific Flyway.
NEWS
November 7, 1991 | BILL BILLITER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bolsa Chica, Southern California's largest wetlands, would be tripled in size in exchange for permission to build 4,884 homes on the perimeter under a development plan unveiled Wednesday by the Koll Co. Although a coalition of local citizens' groups was critical, charging that the number of new houses would overwhelm the ecologically delicate area, Koll Co. officials said their plan would not harm any of the birds or wildlife in the wetlands.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1990
Voting unanimously, the City Council on Monday night launched a move that will ultimately annex the 1,635-acre Bolsa Chica area to the city. The council adopted a schedule of environmental hearings and other procedures that must be conducted before annexation can occur by 1991. The council's action concludes about 20 years of debate within the city on whether to annex Bolsa Chica.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1990 | BILL BILLITER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a major urban and environmental move, the City Council on Monday night is scheduled to start procedures for annexing the 1,635-acre Bolsa Chica area. The vast, ecologically sensitive area would become part of the city by September, 1991, according to the council's proposed timetable. The annexation, which has the blessing and encouragement of Signal Landmark, the major landowner in Bolsa Chica, would put within the city limits the largest wetlands in Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1990 | TAMMERLIN DRUMMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Describing efforts to preserve the Bolsa Chica wetlands as the "largest proposed restoration project of wetlands in the country," Sen. Pete Wilson (R-Calif.) heaped praise on a local coalition Saturday for plans to protect the environmentally sensitive area. The senator, who is running for governor, made his remarks before about 60 people gathered on a bluff overlooking the scenic marsh, across the street from a gated, oceanside development.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1990 | WENDY PAULSON
After years of resisting attempts to transfer the Bolsa Chica wetlands from county to city territory, the development company that owns the property is now asking the City Council to initiate annexation procedures, city officials said Friday. If the annexation is approved, Signal Landmark Co. would have to answer to city, rather than county, officials on its development plans, according to Deputy City Administrator James W. Palin.
NEWS
November 7, 1991 | BILL BILLITER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bolsa Chica, Southern California's largest wetlands, would be tripled in size in exchange for permission to build 4,884 homes on the perimeter under a development plan unveiled Wednesday by the Koll Co. Although a coalition of local citizens' groups was critical, charging that the number of new houses would overwhelm the ecologically delicate area, Koll Co. officials said their plan would not harm any of the birds or wildlife in the wetlands.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1990 | WENDY PAULSON
After years of resisting attempts to transfer the Bolsa Chica wetlands from county to city territory, the development company that owns the property is now asking the City Council to initiate annexation procedures, city officials said Friday. If the annexation is approved, Signal Landmark Co. would have to answer to city, rather than county, officials on its development plans, according to Deputy City Administrator James W. Palin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1990 | BILL BILLITER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a rain-cleansed promontory overlooking Orange County's largest and most important wetlands, a new organization was formally chartered Tuesday afternoon to oversee the Bolsa Chica preserve. Called the Bolsa Chica Conservancy, the five-member, nonprofit group held its dedication in a tent outdoors. About 200 yards away, coveys of migratory ducks bobbed on the rain-swollen wetlands the conservancy was formed to protect.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|