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August 5, 2007 | Rob Kendt, Special to The Times
Playwrights who dedicate themselves to working in the American theater can look forward to lives of lonely scribbling, mystified condescension and relative penury -- and those are the successful ones. For real money, even the best-known dramatists typically rely on grants, teaching gigs or scripts for TV and film; for recognition, the tops in the field can aspire to a Tony, a Pulitzer, a published collection, the occasional rave from fickle critics.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2012 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Almost everyone, sometime, has felt the sting of being treated like the Other. The members of the creative team behind the new chamber musical "Los Otros," which will have its world premiere Sunday at the Mark Taper Forum, are no exceptions. Growing up in western New York state, composer Michael John LaChiusa heard racist slurs against his Italian American family. Graciela Daniele, the show's Tony Award-winning Argentine director, remembers people using an ugly epithet for Latinos when she moved to New York City years ago. "I spoke very little English," Daniele said, "and I laughed with them because I didn't know what it meant.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2007
Signature Theatre: An article Aug. 5 about the Signature Theatre's specialized seasons focusing on individual playwrights incorrectly referred to the Negro Ensemble Company as "now-extinct." The NEC is still in existence in New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2012 | By David C. Nichols
It's understandable that International City Theatre would want to snag the West Coast premiere of "The Fix" in this election year. John Dempsey and Dana P. Rowe's 1997 musical about the backroom machinations behind the orchestrated resurrection of an American political dynasty all but stuffs its own thematic ballot boxes. Originally produced by the Donmar Warehouse in London, revised for the 1998 U.S. premiere at the Signature Theatre in Arlington, Va. (the version used here), "Fix" begins with presidential frontrunner Reed Chandler (William T. Lewis)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1998 | Daryl H. Miller, Daryl H. Miller is a Los Angeles-based theater writer
In 1993, Eric D. Schaeffer asked an architect friend to accompany him to an industrial site he was thinking of transforming into a theater. Light poured through gaping holes in the ceiling. Stacks of abandoned auto bumpers, from the building's former use as a plating plant, littered the floor. The architect was aghast, but Schaeffer talked him into coming up with a renovation plan.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2012 | By David C. Nichols
It's understandable that International City Theatre would want to snag the West Coast premiere of "The Fix" in this election year. John Dempsey and Dana P. Rowe's 1997 musical about the backroom machinations behind the orchestrated resurrection of an American political dynasty all but stuffs its own thematic ballot boxes. Originally produced by the Donmar Warehouse in London, revised for the 1998 U.S. premiere at the Signature Theatre in Arlington, Va. (the version used here), "Fix" begins with presidential frontrunner Reed Chandler (William T. Lewis)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2012 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Almost everyone, sometime, has felt the sting of being treated like the Other. The members of the creative team behind the new chamber musical "Los Otros," which will have its world premiere Sunday at the Mark Taper Forum, are no exceptions. Growing up in western New York state, composer Michael John LaChiusa heard racist slurs against his Italian American family. Graciela Daniele, the show's Tony Award-winning Argentine director, remembers people using an ugly epithet for Latinos when she moved to New York City years ago. "I spoke very little English," Daniele said, "and I laughed with them because I didn't know what it meant.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2013 | By David Ng, Los Angeles Times
The day after the Academy Awards, Lily Rabe was recovering from a night of hard partying around Hollywood. Against her better judgment, she and a friend had danced until dawn even though she was battling a persistent cold. As an experienced theater actress, Rabe isn't one to let illness or fatigue get in the way of punctuality. The 30-year-old actress arrived early to an interview to discuss her upcoming performance in "Miss Julie" at the Geffen Playhouse. And though she had trouble finding the right words to express herself, she was remarkably alert for someone operating on so little sleep.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2009 | Associated Press
Jerry Herman is set for a special Tony Award. The Tony administration committee says the composer of "Hello, Dolly!" and "Mame" will receive a special lifetime achievement prize during the awards ceremony June 7 at Radio City Music Hall. Nominations are being announced today. The 2009 regional theater Tony will go to the Signature Theatre of Arlington, Va. Other special prizes will go to veteran press agent Shirley Herz and to Phyllis Newman, who founded the Phyllis Newman Women's Health Initiative of the Actors Fund.
NEWS
February 12, 2004 | From Associated Press
The New York City Opera is among groups vying to anchor a performing arts center that would sit near the World Trade Center's Freedom Tower, according to a list released by development officials. Other groups competing to move to the site include the Joyce Theater Foundation, the Signature Theatre Co., the Children's Museum of the Arts, the Drawing Center, the Museum of Freedom and the New York Hall of Science, the Lower Manhattan Development Corp. said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2007
Signature Theatre: An article Aug. 5 about the Signature Theatre's specialized seasons focusing on individual playwrights incorrectly referred to the Negro Ensemble Company as "now-extinct." The NEC is still in existence in New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2007 | Rob Kendt, Special to The Times
Playwrights who dedicate themselves to working in the American theater can look forward to lives of lonely scribbling, mystified condescension and relative penury -- and those are the successful ones. For real money, even the best-known dramatists typically rely on grants, teaching gigs or scripts for TV and film; for recognition, the tops in the field can aspire to a Tony, a Pulitzer, a published collection, the occasional rave from fickle critics.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1998 | Daryl H. Miller, Daryl H. Miller is a Los Angeles-based theater writer
In 1993, Eric D. Schaeffer asked an architect friend to accompany him to an industrial site he was thinking of transforming into a theater. Light poured through gaping holes in the ceiling. Stacks of abandoned auto bumpers, from the building's former use as a plating plant, littered the floor. The architect was aghast, but Schaeffer talked him into coming up with a renovation plan.
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