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Signe Wilkinson

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OPINION
April 25, 2010
April 22 marked four decadent decades since the declaration of Earth Day, and the cartoon footprints were everywhere. Signe Wilkinson penned a simple but sharp, small-is-beautiful sentiment. (Less is always more in cartoons; I'm green with envy.) Nate Beeler aired his anti-regulatory grievances as political fallout kept coming from the Eyjafjallajokull eruption. And I pictured the anthropomorphic laments of songbirds and bees, great apes and big cats. After 40 years, we're still debating the fate of the Earth rather than doing much about it. Which means these cartoons could all be recycled for years to come.
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OPINION
October 24, 2010
Everyone is spooked by those frightfully unfair, nasty, negative campaign ads. How dare someone take a tiny kernel of truth and grossly exaggerate it to make a political point? (OK, that's pretty much the job description of an editorial cartoonist.) Signe Wilkinson outfits the trick-or-treater-in-chief in peripatetic pachyderm garb. Rob Rogers dresses up (and dresses down) the freak shows, frauds and faux leaders. And Steve Breen unmasks big money, pointing a bony finger at empty suits with deep pockets.
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OPINION
January 10, 2010
It's going to be an imperfect '10, which means it will be perfect for cartoonists, who resolutely rang in the new year by connecting the dots and tossing metaphorical bombs at terrorists, airport checkpoints and national insecurity. Pat Oliphant was an uninvited second-guesser of the party in power. Bruce Beattie took a cheap shot at California's not-so-golden fiscal state. And Signe Wilkinson reminded us that the funny one-liners are still serious business to the fundamentally humorless with short fuses and long memories.
OPINION
September 26, 2010
We cartoonists put on our thinking caps, noodle about shades-of-gray matters, then offer our opinions in black and white. We don't keep a lid on anything. And we try not to talk through our hats. Pat Bagley deserves a Halliburton deal for his hilarious homophobic headgear. Signe Wilkinson thoroughly covers the subject of our right to self-expression. And Nick Anderson twists the upstart GOP right into so many cartoon balloons. Hats off to all for their updated dunce caps. -- Joel Pett Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist for the Lexington Herald-Leader in Kentucky.
OPINION
March 28, 2010
Healthcare reform cartoons hearkened back to the New Deal, the Fair Deal and, of course, Joe Biden's Big Expletive Deal. But at the epicenter of the historic and hysteric histrionics over womb-to-tomb care, once again, was abortion. Chuck Asay was stupefied as antiabortion Rep. Bart Stupak (D-Mich.) rolled over and played dead. Abortion rights advocate Signe Wilkinson took a hard line against a dysfunctional Congress and erectile dysfunction. I chose the middle ground, wondering when we will ever move beyond this most profoundly personal and divisive of do-or-die political issues.
OPINION
September 26, 2010
We cartoonists put on our thinking caps, noodle about shades-of-gray matters, then offer our opinions in black and white. We don't keep a lid on anything. And we try not to talk through our hats. Pat Bagley deserves a Halliburton deal for his hilarious homophobic headgear. Signe Wilkinson thoroughly covers the subject of our right to self-expression. And Nick Anderson twists the upstart GOP right into so many cartoon balloons. Hats off to all for their updated dunce caps. -- Joel Pett Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist for the Lexington Herald-Leader in Kentucky.
OPINION
September 5, 2010
Before WMD went AWOL, as the war machine was being cranked up and the dreaded "yellow cake" was being served and the French and the Dixie Chicks were being vilified, no group of journalists questioned the war louder and longer than editorial cartoonists. We have the hate mail to prove it. Small solace, but seven years later we can say we told you so. Chan Lowe fingers George "I'm the Decider" Bush, Dick "Deficits Don't Matter" Cheney and Donald "Get Over It" Rumsfeld. Signe Wilkinson recounts the Iraqi tragedy.
OPINION
October 24, 2010
Everyone is spooked by those frightfully unfair, nasty, negative campaign ads. How dare someone take a tiny kernel of truth and grossly exaggerate it to make a political point? (OK, that's pretty much the job description of an editorial cartoonist.) Signe Wilkinson outfits the trick-or-treater-in-chief in peripatetic pachyderm garb. Rob Rogers dresses up (and dresses down) the freak shows, frauds and faux leaders. And Steve Breen unmasks big money, pointing a bony finger at empty suits with deep pockets.
OPINION
May 10, 2009 | Joel Pett, Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist for the Lexington Herald-Leader. His work also appears in USA Today.
After a panicky epidemic (does that make it a pandemic?) of stupid pig tricks, we cartoonists finally found our collective voice on swine flu (muffled though it was through our masks). Nick Anderson revealed the borderline xenophobia of some porcine birdbrains. Signe Wilkinson's press minions were hard-pressed for feverish photo-ops. And I couldn't help but wonder: Would a proliferating viral pathogen by any other name still stink? -- Joel Pett
OPINION
August 16, 2009 | Joel Pett, Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize winning cartoonist at the Lexington Herald-Leader in Kentucky. His work also appears in USA Today.
Cartoonists can really put the spite in respite. Even when we're kicking back, contemplating the waning sunny days of summer, we find something to kick about. Signe Wilkinson's banner day at the beach was seasickening. Stephanie McMillan's domestic policy piece kidded about stay-at-home kids. And as the days grow ever shorter, so do Dan Wasserman's pharm-boys of summer. Dogging people, even in the dog days, that's a cartoonist's natural pastime. -- Joel Pett Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize winning cartoonist at the Lexington Herald-Leader in Kentucky.
OPINION
September 5, 2010
Before WMD went AWOL, as the war machine was being cranked up and the dreaded "yellow cake" was being served and the French and the Dixie Chicks were being vilified, no group of journalists questioned the war louder and longer than editorial cartoonists. We have the hate mail to prove it. Small solace, but seven years later we can say we told you so. Chan Lowe fingers George "I'm the Decider" Bush, Dick "Deficits Don't Matter" Cheney and Donald "Get Over It" Rumsfeld. Signe Wilkinson recounts the Iraqi tragedy.
OPINION
April 25, 2010
April 22 marked four decadent decades since the declaration of Earth Day, and the cartoon footprints were everywhere. Signe Wilkinson penned a simple but sharp, small-is-beautiful sentiment. (Less is always more in cartoons; I'm green with envy.) Nate Beeler aired his anti-regulatory grievances as political fallout kept coming from the Eyjafjallajokull eruption. And I pictured the anthropomorphic laments of songbirds and bees, great apes and big cats. After 40 years, we're still debating the fate of the Earth rather than doing much about it. Which means these cartoons could all be recycled for years to come.
OPINION
March 28, 2010
Healthcare reform cartoons hearkened back to the New Deal, the Fair Deal and, of course, Joe Biden's Big Expletive Deal. But at the epicenter of the historic and hysteric histrionics over womb-to-tomb care, once again, was abortion. Chuck Asay was stupefied as antiabortion Rep. Bart Stupak (D-Mich.) rolled over and played dead. Abortion rights advocate Signe Wilkinson took a hard line against a dysfunctional Congress and erectile dysfunction. I chose the middle ground, wondering when we will ever move beyond this most profoundly personal and divisive of do-or-die political issues.
OPINION
January 10, 2010
It's going to be an imperfect '10, which means it will be perfect for cartoonists, who resolutely rang in the new year by connecting the dots and tossing metaphorical bombs at terrorists, airport checkpoints and national insecurity. Pat Oliphant was an uninvited second-guesser of the party in power. Bruce Beattie took a cheap shot at California's not-so-golden fiscal state. And Signe Wilkinson reminded us that the funny one-liners are still serious business to the fundamentally humorless with short fuses and long memories.
OPINION
September 27, 2009 | Joel Pett
Forget the 5-cent cigar -- what this country needs is more high-level international meetings on intractable and divisive long-term problems. Americans were riveted by the global warming summit, the president's appearance at the United Nations and the G-20 economic forum. OK, not so riveted, but cartoonists took note. Rob Rogers expressed his hometown hosting pride, Signe Wilkinson reminded us of the rough international company we keep, and I went ballistic over rising tides. Say ... don't cigars emit greenhouse gases anyway?
OPINION
August 16, 2009 | Joel Pett, Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize winning cartoonist at the Lexington Herald-Leader in Kentucky. His work also appears in USA Today.
Cartoonists can really put the spite in respite. Even when we're kicking back, contemplating the waning sunny days of summer, we find something to kick about. Signe Wilkinson's banner day at the beach was seasickening. Stephanie McMillan's domestic policy piece kidded about stay-at-home kids. And as the days grow ever shorter, so do Dan Wasserman's pharm-boys of summer. Dogging people, even in the dog days, that's a cartoonist's natural pastime. -- Joel Pett Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize winning cartoonist at the Lexington Herald-Leader in Kentucky.
OPINION
August 9, 2009 | Joel Pett, Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist for the Lexington Herald-Leader. His work also appears in USA Today.
Scrap the cartoon clunkers about cash for cars, the sophomoric scribbles about Bill Clinton rescuing young women, and the mountains of (news)paperwork on healthcare and consider this triumvirate on the current state of the axis-formerly-known-as-evil. In North Korea, Signe Wilkinson takes a little shot at Kim Jong Il's stature. Petar Pismestrovic mulls Iranian mullahs and their string of electoral successes. And with U.S. troops departed from Iraq's urban areas, Pat Bagley's French, er, freedom joke is on us. -- Joel Pett Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist for the Lexington Herald-Leader.
OPINION
September 27, 2009 | Joel Pett
Forget the 5-cent cigar -- what this country needs is more high-level international meetings on intractable and divisive long-term problems. Americans were riveted by the global warming summit, the president's appearance at the United Nations and the G-20 economic forum. OK, not so riveted, but cartoonists took note. Rob Rogers expressed his hometown hosting pride, Signe Wilkinson reminded us of the rough international company we keep, and I went ballistic over rising tides. Say ... don't cigars emit greenhouse gases anyway?
OPINION
August 9, 2009 | Joel Pett, Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist for the Lexington Herald-Leader. His work also appears in USA Today.
Scrap the cartoon clunkers about cash for cars, the sophomoric scribbles about Bill Clinton rescuing young women, and the mountains of (news)paperwork on healthcare and consider this triumvirate on the current state of the axis-formerly-known-as-evil. In North Korea, Signe Wilkinson takes a little shot at Kim Jong Il's stature. Petar Pismestrovic mulls Iranian mullahs and their string of electoral successes. And with U.S. troops departed from Iraq's urban areas, Pat Bagley's French, er, freedom joke is on us. -- Joel Pett Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist for the Lexington Herald-Leader.
OPINION
May 10, 2009 | Joel Pett, Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist for the Lexington Herald-Leader. His work also appears in USA Today.
After a panicky epidemic (does that make it a pandemic?) of stupid pig tricks, we cartoonists finally found our collective voice on swine flu (muffled though it was through our masks). Nick Anderson revealed the borderline xenophobia of some porcine birdbrains. Signe Wilkinson's press minions were hard-pressed for feverish photo-ops. And I couldn't help but wonder: Would a proliferating viral pathogen by any other name still stink? -- Joel Pett
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