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Signe Wilkinson

OPINION
November 30, 2008 | Joel Pett, Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist of the Lexington Herald-Leader. His work also appears in USA Today.
How to measure cartoonists' confidence? Here's a clue: Forget red -- the more black ink spilled, the bleaker the outlook. Scott Stantis used a barrelful while resurrecting a classic disaster metaphor. Steve Kelley opted for a lighter but still dark touch, co-opting another comic classic. But Signe Wilkinson hungered for something that captured the holiday spirit, and she delivered. So relax. The "fun"-damentals of satire are sound. -- Joel Pett
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OPINION
February 8, 2009 | Joel Pett, Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist of the Lexington Herald-Leader. His work also appears in USA Today.
News flash! Star fish hits water pipe! Mail threatened with ax! Female spawns octet! No matter what the top story, recession-obsessed cartoonists showed us the money. Tom Toles turned Fleet Street gotcha into Wall Street gold. Signe Wilkinson welcomed relief from unwelcome correspondence. And John Trever stimulated his fertile imagination, producing a bed full of dreadful projects. (Donkey dad produces plethora of porcine progeny!) -- Joel Pett
OPINION
March 16, 2008 | Joel Pett, Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist of the Lexington Herald-Leader. His work also appears in USA Today.
For the doodling classes, nothing fills a day like a sex scandal. To misquote Kurt Vonnegut, God bless you, Eliot Spitzer! Stories about "Client 9" and his high-priced help (the ladies, not the lawyers) were a Page One staple, and cartoonists couldn't resist. Signe Wilkinson sympathized with the shamed, stoic spouse. Dan Wasserman let his ethical fantasies run wild. But Mike Lester's punch-line-drawing provided the keenest perspective.
OPINION
November 6, 2005 | Joel Pett, Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist of the Lexington Herald-Leader. His work also appears in USA Today.
In serving up satire, the meat is important, but so is the presentation. Most readers, and editors, prefer the sound-bite style of Signe Wilkinson's neo-convictions, but such artful understatement isn't always possible. Ann Telnaes' dissent to Supreme Court nominee Samuel Alito's abortion-law logic couldn't have been digested without a slightly more detailed drawing. And when you choose the multi-panel smorgasbord, the punch line has to be worth the effort.
OPINION
March 23, 2008 | Joel Pett, Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist of the Lexington Herald-Leader. His work also appears in USA Today.
Who says religion and political cartoons don't mix? A bounty of such blessings were bestowed this week. Rob Rogers couldn't pass over the five-year mark of the Iraq war. Signe Wilkinson's biblical imagery was the best of the flock of Barack Obama observations. And I confess to resurrecting a seasonal visual cliche but beg forgiveness because bracketology is indeed a religion in some parts.
NEWS
September 7, 2008 | Joel Pett, Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist of the Lexington Herald-Leader. His work also appears in USA Today.
John McMaverick spurned conventional wisdom, spurring cartoonists' conventional wit. His faith-based, drill-now hockey mom with the pro-life profile pumped up the faithful by drilling the fist-bumpers with stinging slap shots. The rifle-toting, polar-bear huntress polarized the convention center, overshadowing the standard-bearer and other big guns. Signe Wilkinson sympathized, Tom Toles just said no, and Jim Borgman considered the outreach a stretch. Borgman, incidentally, announced his retirement after 32 years at the Cincinnati Enquirer.
OPINION
January 20, 2008 | Joel Pett, Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist of the Lexington Herald-Leader. His work also appears in USA Today.
As pundits pondered gender and color, and Democratic kingmakers evoked the legacy of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., cartoonists raced to make sure our minority voices were heard. Well, seen. Many caricatured the exchange between the Clinton and Obama camps as scurrilous mudslinging or low blows to the memory of the civil rights leader. Jack Ohman's ever-effective visual style was evocative, even as he took uncivil liberties with a famous speech.
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