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Significant Ecological Areas

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1993 | JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Environmentalists appear likely to fail in their appeal of a ruling permitting the construction of the 1,890-unit Westridge project on an ecologically sensitive area of valley oaks and savanna grasses. Lawyers for the developer of the 799-acre project, which includes a county-designated significant ecological area, filed a motion to dismiss the appeal last week, said a spokeswoman for Newhall Land and Farming Co.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2001 | ANNETTE KONDO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ephemeral springtime pools north of the Santa Clarita Valley, where endangered fairy shrimp flourish, are one of the little-known ecological assets of the Los Angeles County area that should be preserved, according to a new report. The Regional Planning Commission on Wednesday began its review of significant ecological areas, the first update of the county's list in more than two decades.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 1991 | AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A program designed to preserve 61 areas designated the most ecologically valuable land in Los Angeles County failed to protect them from development and needs strengthening, Supervisor Ed Edelman said Tuesday. Edelman recommended to the Board of Supervisors that prospective developers be required to provide additional environmental and biological studies of the zones, which are officially designated as Significant Ecological Areas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1994 | SANDY WOHLGEMUTH, Sandy Wohlgemuth of Reseda is conservation chairman of the Los Angeles Audubon Society. and
If a poll taker asked for a definition of the acronym SEA, most people would have no idea. Yet Significant Ecological Areas are important if one believes that Southern California is well on its way to becoming wall-to-wall housing tracts and commercial zones. SEAs are designated by Los Angeles County as open spaces of special value for native plants and wildlife that must be preserved from inappropriate development.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1992 | AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An environmental consultant hired by Los Angeles County to review sensitive ecological areas found that many of them have been significantly damaged since they were last studied in 1976, according to a report released to the county Regional Planning Commission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1993 | JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In trying to protect their majestic oaks and savanna grasses, a group of Santa Clarita Valley naturalists hopes to win tighter rules to preserve all the sensitive environments in Los Angeles County. Through its lawsuit against the county and the Newhall Land & Farming Co., the Santa Clarita Organization for Planning the Environment believes that it ultimately can preserve what many naturalists see as the county's oft-abused system of Significant Ecological Areas, commonly called SEAs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2001 | ANNETTE KONDO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ephemeral springtime pools north of the Santa Clarita Valley, where endangered fairy shrimp flourish, are one of the little-known ecological assets of the Los Angeles County area that should be preserved, according to a new report. The Regional Planning Commission on Wednesday began its review of significant ecological areas, the first update of the county's list in more than two decades.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1994 | SANDY WOHLGEMUTH, Sandy Wohlgemuth of Reseda is conservation chairman of the Los Angeles Audubon Society. and
If a poll taker asked for a definition of the acronym SEA, most people would have no idea. Yet Significant Ecological Areas are important if one believes that Southern California is well on its way to becoming wall-to-wall housing tracts and commercial zones. SEAs are designated by Los Angeles County as open spaces of special value for native plants and wildlife that must be preserved from inappropriate development.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1991
A proposal to strengthen protection of Los Angeles County's Significant Ecological Areas got a largely favorable response at a public hearing Thursday, but the session was continued until Monday to allow more people to speak. The hearing before the Regional Planning Commission will resume at 10 a.m. Monday in the county Hall of Records, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1993 | JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Environmentalists appear likely to fail in their appeal of a ruling permitting the construction of the 1,890-unit Westridge project on an ecologically sensitive area of valley oaks and savanna grasses. Lawyers for the developer of the 799-acre project, which includes a county-designated significant ecological area, filed a motion to dismiss the appeal last week, said a spokeswoman for Newhall Land and Farming Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1993
Developers and environmentalists have long been at loggerheads in Los Angeles County. One example is the Westridge project in the Santa Clarita Valley that would build 1,800 homes and a golf course on part of one of the county's Significant Ecological Areas, or SEAs. A related lawsuit may establish an important point.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1993 | JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In trying to protect their majestic oaks and savanna grasses, a group of Santa Clarita Valley naturalists hopes to win tighter rules to preserve all the sensitive environments in Los Angeles County. Through its lawsuit against the county and the Newhall Land & Farming Co., the Santa Clarita Organization for Planning the Environment believes that it ultimately can preserve what many naturalists see as the county's oft-abused system of Significant Ecological Areas, commonly called SEAs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1992 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The long and tortured tale of the Malibu Terrace housing project continues--the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors has ordered the developers to scale back their plan because it would harm a sensitive ecological area in the hills near Calabasas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 1992 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County supervisors approved the controversial Westridge Golf Course Community on Thursday, despite protests that the housing development will damage an environmentally sensitive oak savannah near Santa Clarita. The board's 4-0 vote followed less than half an hour of discussion and drew immediate criticism from Santa Clarita officials and other opponents of the mammoth project. Newhall Land & Farming Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1992 | AMY PYLE and CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS, TIMES TRAVEL WRITER
The Los Angeles County Department of Regional Planning announced Tuesday that it has hired its first staff biologist, a position created largely to analyze projects in some of the county's most environmentally sensitive areas. Daryl Koutnik, who holds a doctorate in botany from UC Davis and bachelor's degree in biology from Cal State Northridge, will begin work June 1, Planning Administrator John Schwarze said.
NEWS
December 27, 1990 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's hard to get a quorum for meetings of the Significant Ecological Areas Technical Advisory Committee, also known as SEATAC. Keeping a quorum is harder still, because members sometimes must excuse themselves to avoid conflicts of interest. The obscure panel's seven members advise planning officials on building projects in the county's 61 Significant Ecological Areas and recommend design features to reduce environmental damage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1992 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Santa Clarita developer Wednesday offered to donate 190 acres dotted with walnut trees to a conservation agency in exchange for permission to expand a huge housing tract onto 90 acres of an officially designated sensitive oak woodland. The proposal by Dale Poe Development Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1992 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles County advisory committee Monday called for a new policy requiring developers who degrade Significant Ecological Areas to acquire and preserve replacement lands of similar habitat value. The Significant Ecological Area Technical Advisory Committee endorsed the policy as a way to slow the loss of the county's 61 Significant Ecological Areas, mostly private lands that were designated a dozen years ago as strongholds of native plants and wildlife.
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