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Signs Movie

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2002 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In M. Night Shyamalan's new sci-fi thriller, "Signs," a Pennsylvania farmer played by Mel Gibson awakens one morning to discover a 500-foot geometric pattern that has mysteriously appeared in his cornfield overnight.
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BUSINESS
September 11, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Abu Dhabi Media Co.'s new movie company subsidiary Imagenation Abu Dhabi has signed a deal with Jeff Skoll's Participant Media as part of its recently announced commitment to fund more than $1 billion in movie productions. The agreement between the government-controlled Abu Dhabi company and Participant -- the first of three deals Imagenation intends to make with producers -- allows for a five-year revolving fund of as much as $250 million to cover production and marketing costs for 15 to 18 features.
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BUSINESS
September 11, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Abu Dhabi Media Co.'s new movie company subsidiary Imagenation Abu Dhabi has signed a deal with Jeff Skoll's Participant Media as part of its recently announced commitment to fund more than $1 billion in movie productions. The agreement between the government-controlled Abu Dhabi company and Participant -- the first of three deals Imagenation intends to make with producers -- allows for a five-year revolving fund of as much as $250 million to cover production and marketing costs for 15 to 18 features.
BUSINESS
October 22, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Walt Disney Co. said Friday that it would provide America Online with exclusive movie content as part of an effort to find new audiences. AOL's websites, such as Moviefone.com, will offer a first look at photos, artwork, behind-the-scenes video and footage from Disney's "The Chronicles of Narnia," set for release this holiday season, the companies said. AOL is a unit of New York-based Time Warner Inc.
BUSINESS
October 22, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Walt Disney Co. said Friday that it would provide America Online with exclusive movie content as part of an effort to find new audiences. AOL's websites, such as Moviefone.com, will offer a first look at photos, artwork, behind-the-scenes video and footage from Disney's "The Chronicles of Narnia," set for release this holiday season, the companies said. AOL is a unit of New York-based Time Warner Inc.
NEWS
May 4, 1995 | BILL HIGGINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Scene: Tuesday's West Coast benefit premiere of Gramercy's "Panther" at the Motion Picture Academy. The controversial film, directed by Mario Van Peebles and written by his father, Melvin, does for the Black Panthers what Oliver Stone did for the Kennedy assassination--proves that nobody agrees on anything that happened in the '60s. * Who Was There: The Van Peebleses, the film's stars, Kadeem Hardison, Courtney B.
BUSINESS
August 29, 2001 | JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Having persuaded a group of Hollywood studios to offer movies on demand online, Sony Pictures Entertainment said Tuesday that it agreed to make its films available on demand through cable TV. Sony subsidiary Columbia TriStar International Television granted a long-term video-on-demand license to In Demand, a leading supplier of cable pay-per-view fare.
NEWS
July 9, 1987 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, Times Staff Writer
A Glendale businessman who unsuccessfully challenged the constitutionality of the city's law on signs for more than a decade is back in court again--this time for refusing to change oversized wall signs on his office building. Insurance broker Bob New last year lost a legal battle to save a rooftop sign on his building at 736 N. Glendale Ave. He maintained that the law violates his right to free speech, but the state Supreme Court would not consider the case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2003 | Steve Lopez
A snapshot of LAPD Deputy Chief Mike Hillman has been making the rounds among brass at Parker Center. In the photograph, taken at the demonstrations on the evening of the Academy Awards, Hillman has a bullhorn in one hand and a citizen's neck in the other. I thought it must be a police recruiting photo, but I decided not to jump to conclusions. Hillman got a two-level promotion from Chief William J. Bratton in December, so he must have the right stuff.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2002 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In M. Night Shyamalan's new sci-fi thriller, "Signs," a Pennsylvania farmer played by Mel Gibson awakens one morning to discover a 500-foot geometric pattern that has mysteriously appeared in his cornfield overnight.
BUSINESS
August 29, 2001 | JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Having persuaded a group of Hollywood studios to offer movies on demand online, Sony Pictures Entertainment said Tuesday that it agreed to make its films available on demand through cable TV. Sony subsidiary Columbia TriStar International Television granted a long-term video-on-demand license to In Demand, a leading supplier of cable pay-per-view fare.
NEWS
May 4, 1995 | BILL HIGGINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Scene: Tuesday's West Coast benefit premiere of Gramercy's "Panther" at the Motion Picture Academy. The controversial film, directed by Mario Van Peebles and written by his father, Melvin, does for the Black Panthers what Oliver Stone did for the Kennedy assassination--proves that nobody agrees on anything that happened in the '60s. * Who Was There: The Van Peebleses, the film's stars, Kadeem Hardison, Courtney B.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1990 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
"Coupe de Ville" (selected theaters), a mediocre road comedy with a few sparkling scenes, tackles that pivotal cultural question of the '60s: Exactly what were the lyrics of the Kingsmen's mush-mouthed big-beat hit "Louie Louie"? Were they, as many suspect, a barrage of unrelieved scatology and filth? Were they a tender, if incoherent, love song? Or were they, as one "Coupe" character stoutly maintains, a sea chantey about a voyage to Jamaica?
HOME & GARDEN
August 31, 2013 | Robyn Brown, Brown is a freelance writer and editor in Los Angeles. She recently completed a TV pilot and young adult sci-fi romance novel
"I've waited this long for Mr. Right," my 38-year-old sister said as she leaned toward me over her albacore protein roll, the sushi restaurant buzzing with sake-soaked conversation. "I'm not going to settle for anything less than magic. " I knew the adrenaline rush she meant. In the wake of my divorce eight years ago, I'd fallen hard for a new boyfriend -- a contemporary artist who was scruffy in a way I thought very Julian Schnabel but my friends considered merely dirty -- and my life of petty arguments and lawyer phone calls suddenly seemed dusted with a dreamy shimmer of serendipity.
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