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Sigurjon Sighvatsson

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BUSINESS
August 2, 1990 | ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When director David Lynch assembled the staff for the quirky television series "Twin Peaks," the founders of Propaganda Films were obvious choices. Steve Golin and Sigurjon Sighvatsson made their reputations by producing stylistically adventurous music videos, so their visions were as compatible as coffee and doughnuts. The rest is pop culture history, as far as "Twin Peaks" is concerned. But the partnership did not end there.
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BUSINESS
August 2, 1990 | ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When director David Lynch assembled the staff for the quirky television series "Twin Peaks," the founders of Propaganda Films were obvious choices. Steve Golin and Sigurjon Sighvatsson made their reputations by producing stylistically adventurous music videos, so their visions were as compatible as coffee and doughnuts. The rest is pop culture history, as far as "Twin Peaks" is concerned. But the partnership did not end there.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1994 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Dahl's terrific film noir "Red Rock West" brings to mind the Coen brothers' "Blood Simple," Carl Colpaert's "Delusion" and his own "Kill Me Again" in its clever plotting and wide-open-spaces setting. It's also got an admirable something more: a concern for decency, embodied by Nicolas Cage's entirely likable Michael. He's so honest that when a friend helps him line up a job as an oil-rigger in Wyoming, he blows the chance by admitting that he's got a game leg.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1992 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Candyman" (citywide), the latest Clive Barker shocker, is his worst to date: an ambitious would-be morality play/thriller of the supernatural involving racism and mythology that seems merely pretentious and preposterous as it drowns in gallons of blood and guts. To pull it off would take the utmost artistry and imagination, but writer-director Bernard Rose expends his energy mainly on the easier task of churning up violence and gore for its own sake.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1995 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Candyman: Farewell to the Flesh," like the 1992 "Candyman," overflows with blood and guts, drowning a potent metaphor for African American rage and oppression. Those who saw the original film will recall that the supernatural figure of its title, summoned by repeating his nickname five times while peering into a mirror, materialized in Chicago's Cabrini-Green housing project, already the site of so much crime and poverty.
NEWS
October 2, 1995 | BILL HIGGINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One organizer of American Cinematheque's Moving Picture Ball said he wanted Friday's gala to be "non-boring." In that sense, it succeeded. However, the event could have used some inventiveness and heart to go along with the non-boringness.
NEWS
September 23, 1996 | By BILL HIGGINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The American Cinematheque took 1,000 guests on a long cruise through glamorous waters at its 11th annual Moving Picture Ball Saturday in the Beverly Hilton's ballroom. Tom Cruise was the honoree, Rosie O'Donnell acted as captain/emcee, and $400,000 was raised for the nonprofit organization that promotes film as an art form. By 1998, that promotion should be taking place in the Egyptian Theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 1995 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ready for another movie about how the media are wrecking our lives? "S.F.W.," which was originally scheduled for release last year, is a low-grade, grunge companion piece to "Natural Born Killers." Based on the novel by Andrew Wellman, and directed and co-written by Jefery Levy, it wallops the audience with mega-heavy-metal boom-boom theatrics. There hasn't been this much attitude in a movie since--well, since "Natural Born Killers."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2000 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In "Passion of Mind," Demi Moore plays an emotionally detached career woman who believes that, when she falls asleep each night in Manhattan, she wakes to a completely different life as a widow and loving mother in France. Or is it the other way around? She might be dreaming, as acquaintances on both continents keep telling her, but if she is, which life is real? Such a quandary could keep a platoon of psychiatrists busy for years.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1994 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ray Reardon (James Spader) is an upscale architect, just divorced, who appears to be leading the perfect life. He's highly successful, handsome, smart and on the prowl. Then he encounters a woman who is so eminently his "type"--moody and darkly attractive--that he's hooked. Lena (Madchen Amick) is alternately blunt and full of ah-sweet-mystery airs, and Ray spends most of his courtship in a state of deep ga-ga.
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