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Sikh Temple Shooting

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August 22, 2012 | By Laura J. Nelson
A police officer shot nine times as he tried to help a victim of the Sikh temple shooting near Milwaukee has left the hospital, officials said Wednesday. Lt. Brian Murphy of the Oak Creek Police Department responded to a call Aug. 5 that a gunman was attacking worshipers inside the Sikh Temple of Wisconsin. As he tried to help a victim, police said, the shooter ambushed him. Despite his wounds, Murphy told rescuers to help others first.  PHOTOS: Gunman opened fire at Sikh temple "He had been shot nine times - one of them very serious in the neck area - and he waved them off and told them to go into the temple to assist those in there," Oak Creek Police Chief John Edwards told reporters earlier this month.
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NATIONAL
September 10, 2012 | By Matt Pearce
When Wade Page began his shooting rampage at a Sikh temple in Wisconsin on Aug. 5, he got the drop on the first officer who responded to the scene, shooting Lt. Brian Murphy 15 times. But he didn't get the drop on the second officer, Sam Lenda, who felled Page with a long-distance rifle shot to the stomach. New video released on Monday by Oak Creek, Wis., police and Milwaukee County prosecutors show police dashboard camera images of the shooting, which left six dead and four seriously wounded.
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NATIONAL
September 10, 2012 | By Matt Pearce
When Wade Page began his shooting rampage at a Sikh temple in Wisconsin on Aug. 5, he got the drop on the first officer who responded to the scene, shooting Lt. Brian Murphy 15 times. But he didn't get the drop on the second officer, Sam Lenda, who felled Page with a long-distance rifle shot to the stomach. New video released on Monday by Oak Creek, Wis., police and Milwaukee County prosecutors show police dashboard camera images of the shooting, which left six dead and four seriously wounded.
NATIONAL
August 22, 2012 | By Laura J. Nelson
A police officer shot nine times as he tried to help a victim of the Sikh temple shooting near Milwaukee has left the hospital, officials said Wednesday. Lt. Brian Murphy of the Oak Creek Police Department responded to a call Aug. 5 that a gunman was attacking worshipers inside the Sikh Temple of Wisconsin. As he tried to help a victim, police said, the shooter ambushed him. Despite his wounds, Murphy told rescuers to help others first.  PHOTOS: Gunman opened fire at Sikh temple "He had been shot nine times - one of them very serious in the neck area - and he waved them off and told them to go into the temple to assist those in there," Oak Creek Police Chief John Edwards told reporters earlier this month.
NATIONAL
August 6, 2012 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske and Michael Muskal
OAK CREEK, Wisc. -- Wade Michael Page, an Army veteran who was a “psychological operations specialist,” was identified as the gunman in a deadly Sikh temple shooting, officials said Monday morning. As authorities searched for a motive in the Sunday attack, the first picture of the assailant began to emerge. Page died in a shootout with police outside the temple in suburban Milwaukee. In all, seven people, including the suspect, were dead and three others were critically wounded in what police have labeled an act of domestic terrorism.
NATIONAL
August 5, 2012 | By Matt Pearce
Families anxiously waited to learn who lived and who died during a mass shooting at a Sikh temple in suburban Milwaukee on Sunday.  At least three men remain in critical condition.  "One is in surgical intensive care, one is in the operating room and one is in the emergency room," Froedtert Hospital spokeswoman Beth Strohbusch told the Chicago Tribune. According to police, local media reports and witness accounts, a gunman attacked the Sikh Temple of Wisconsin in Oak Creek shortly after 10 a.m. CT. Four died inside the building and three died outside, including the shooter, who exchanged gunfire with the first police officer to arrive on the scene.  PHOTOS: Gunman opened fire at Sikh temple The officer, a 20-year veteran, was hit several times but is expected to live, police said.
NATIONAL
August 6, 2012 | By Brian Bennett
WASHINGTON -- Federal investigators had “looked at” Sikh temple gunman Wade Michael Page more than once because of his associations with right-wing extremists and the possibility that he was providing funding to a domestic terrorist group, but law enforcement officials at the time determined there was not enough evidence of a crime to open an investigation, a senior U.S. law enforcement official said. The official, who spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak to the media, would not say Monday which law enforcement agency had considered investigating Page, or when.
NATIONAL
August 7, 2012 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
MILWAUKEE -- The stepmother of the man believed to have launched a deadly attack on a Sikh temple described him, growing up, as a kind and loving boy who seemed to be well-adjusted. In a telephone interview,  Laurie Page, 67, of Denver discussed Wade Michael Page, 40, who was shot to death by police Sunday. Authorities have said Page attacked a Sikh temple in Oak Creek, Wis., killing six people and wounding three. Sobbing at times, Laurie Page said she got to know Page in Littleton, Colo., before his mother died of lupus in 1985 when he was 13. She said he never had mental health problems and that he had friends and appeared well-adjusted.
NATIONAL
August 6, 2012 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske and Michael Muskal
OAK CREEK, Wisc. -- A discharged Army veteran and racist advocate of white power acted alone when he attacked a Sikh temple in suburban Milwaukee and killed six people, officials said Monday. At a news conference in Wisconsin, local and federal officials formally named the shooter as Wade Michael Page, 40, who served more than six years in the Army until he was separated with a less than honorable discharge. Page had been demoted in rank from sergeant, according to an official who spoke on the condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak to the media.
NATIONAL
August 6, 2012 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
OAK CREEK, Wis. -- A “person of interest” sought by investigators in connection with the shooting Sunday at a Sikh temple here has been identified and ruled out as a suspect, an FBI spokesman said. Leonard Peace of the FBI said the man, whom he declined to identify, “has been located, interviewed and ruled out in connection with the investigation.” Earlier Monday, officials displayed a photograph of the man, who had showed up at the shooting scene, and said they wanted to talk with him, even though they were convinced that a single gunman was responsible for killing six and wounded three.
NATIONAL
August 8, 2012 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske and Kim Murphy
OAK CREEK, Wis. -- Wade Michael Page, the man investigators say killed six people and critically wounded three others at a Sikh temple Sunday before dying in a shootout with police, did not appear dangerous when he bought a handgun at a shop last month, the shop owner says. Kevin Nugent, owner of the Shooters Shop, about eight miles southwest of Milwaukee in West Allis, Wis., told The Times that Page came looking for a handgun on July 28. “He asked about a 9 millimeter,” Nugent said Tuesday.
NATIONAL
August 7, 2012 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
MILWAUKEE -- The stepmother of the man believed to have launched a deadly attack on a Sikh temple described him, growing up, as a kind and loving boy who seemed to be well-adjusted. In a telephone interview,  Laurie Page, 67, of Denver discussed Wade Michael Page, 40, who was shot to death by police Sunday. Authorities have said Page attacked a Sikh temple in Oak Creek, Wis., killing six people and wounding three. Sobbing at times, Laurie Page said she got to know Page in Littleton, Colo., before his mother died of lupus in 1985 when he was 13. She said he never had mental health problems and that he had friends and appeared well-adjusted.
NATIONAL
August 6, 2012 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
OAK CREEK, Wis. -- A “person of interest” sought by investigators in connection with the shooting Sunday at a Sikh temple here has been identified and ruled out as a suspect, an FBI spokesman said. Leonard Peace of the FBI said the man, whom he declined to identify, “has been located, interviewed and ruled out in connection with the investigation.” Earlier Monday, officials displayed a photograph of the man, who had showed up at the shooting scene, and said they wanted to talk with him, even though they were convinced that a single gunman was responsible for killing six and wounded three.
NATIONAL
August 6, 2012 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske and Michael Muskal
OAK CREEK, Wisc. -- A discharged Army veteran and racist advocate of white power acted alone when he attacked a Sikh temple in suburban Milwaukee and killed six people, officials said Monday. At a news conference in Wisconsin, local and federal officials formally named the shooter as Wade Michael Page, 40, who served more than six years in the Army until he was separated with a less than honorable discharge. Page had been demoted in rank from sergeant, according to an official who spoke on the condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak to the media.
NATIONAL
August 6, 2012 | Los Angeles Times
OAK CREEK, Wis. - The gunman who killed six people at a Sikh temple had a criminal record, a history of involvement in the white supremacist movement and a checkered career in the Army, law enforcement authorities and organizations that monitor hate groups said Monday. Nevertheless, Wade Michael Page, 40, was able to legally purchase a 9-millimeter handgun at a local gun store and was believed to have acted alone when he entered the temple in a Milwaukee suburb Sunday morning and opened fire.
NATIONAL
August 6, 2012 | By Brian Bennett
WASHINGTON -- Federal investigators had “looked at” Sikh temple gunman Wade Michael Page more than once because of his associations with right-wing extremists and the possibility that he was providing funding to a domestic terrorist group, but law enforcement officials at the time determined there was not enough evidence of a crime to open an investigation, a senior U.S. law enforcement official said. The official, who spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak to the media, would not say Monday which law enforcement agency had considered investigating Page, or when.
NATIONAL
August 6, 2012 | Los Angeles Times
OAK CREEK, Wis. - The gunman who killed six people at a Sikh temple had a criminal record, a history of involvement in the white supremacist movement and a checkered career in the Army, law enforcement authorities and organizations that monitor hate groups said Monday. Nevertheless, Wade Michael Page, 40, was able to legally purchase a 9-millimeter handgun at a local gun store and was believed to have acted alone when he entered the temple in a Milwaukee suburb Sunday morning and opened fire.
NATIONAL
August 6, 2012 | By Dan Hinkel, Rosemary R. Sobol and Brian Bennett, Tribune staff writers
OAK CREEK, Wis. - A rampage at a Sikh temple that left seven dead and three critically wounded Sunday was called a possible case of domestic terrorism, prompting the FBI to take over the investigation. One of the dead was the suspected gunman. Tattoos on his body and certain biographical details led to the preliminary terrorism classification, according to a federal official, who spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak to the press. In an afternoon press conference, Oak Creek Police Chief John Edwards called it a case of domestic terrorism.
NATIONAL
August 6, 2012 | By Dan Hinkel, Rosemary R. Sobol and Brian Bennett, Tribune staff writers
OAK CREEK, Wis. - A rampage at a Sikh temple that left seven dead and three critically wounded Sunday was called a possible case of domestic terrorism, prompting the FBI to take over the investigation. One of the dead was the suspected gunman. Tattoos on his body and certain biographical details led to the preliminary terrorism classification, according to a federal official, who spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak to the press. In an afternoon press conference, Oak Creek Police Chief John Edwards called it a case of domestic terrorism.
NATIONAL
August 6, 2012 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske and Michael Muskal
OAK CREEK, Wisc. -- Wade Michael Page, an Army veteran who was a “psychological operations specialist,” was identified as the gunman in a deadly Sikh temple shooting, officials said Monday morning. As authorities searched for a motive in the Sunday attack, the first picture of the assailant began to emerge. Page died in a shootout with police outside the temple in suburban Milwaukee. In all, seven people, including the suspect, were dead and three others were critically wounded in what police have labeled an act of domestic terrorism.
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