Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSilber
IN THE NEWS

Silber

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2010 | By Charlotte Stoudt
Resistance is futile. The music of "Carousel," with its hypnotic score and soaring love songs ("If I Loved You," "You'll Never Walk Alone"), has survived telethons, high school graduations and Simon Cowell. Now this Rodgers and Hammerstein perennial is back in L.A. with a fresh take and a rising new star. Opening tonight at UCLA's Freud Playhouse, the Reprise staging of "Carousel" marks the American theater debut of Alexandra Silber, a Los Angeles-born talent already celebrated in London for her West End performance as Julie Jordan, a young mill worker in late-19th-century New England who falls hard for Billy Bigelow, a carnival barker torn between love and grift.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2010 | By Keith Thursby, Los Angeles Times
Irwin Silber, who became a key figure in the revival of folk music beginning in the 1950s as editor of the magazine Sing Out!, has died. He was 84. Silber, who was also a producer and wrote and edited several books on music and other subjects, died Wednesday at an extended-care facility in Oakland, his stepdaughter Nina Menendez said. He had Alzheimer's disease. Silber founded Sing Out! in 1950 with legendary folk singer Pete Seeger and others. It became an influential publication that covered 1950s stars such as Seeger and Woody Guthrie, then in the '60s included such upcoming artists as Bob Dylan, Joan Baez and many others.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2010 | By Keith Thursby, Los Angeles Times
Irwin Silber, who became a key figure in the revival of folk music beginning in the 1950s as editor of the magazine Sing Out!, has died. He was 84. Silber, who was also a producer and wrote and edited several books on music and other subjects, died Wednesday at an extended-care facility in Oakland, his stepdaughter Nina Menendez said. He had Alzheimer's disease. Silber founded Sing Out! in 1950 with legendary folk singer Pete Seeger and others. It became an influential publication that covered 1950s stars such as Seeger and Woody Guthrie, then in the '60s included such upcoming artists as Bob Dylan, Joan Baez and many others.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2010 | By Charlotte Stoudt
Resistance is futile. The music of "Carousel," with its hypnotic score and soaring love songs ("If I Loved You," "You'll Never Walk Alone"), has survived telethons, high school graduations and Simon Cowell. Now this Rodgers and Hammerstein perennial is back in L.A. with a fresh take and a rising new star. Opening tonight at UCLA's Freud Playhouse, the Reprise staging of "Carousel" marks the American theater debut of Alexandra Silber, a Los Angeles-born talent already celebrated in London for her West End performance as Julie Jordan, a young mill worker in late-19th-century New England who falls hard for Billy Bigelow, a carnival barker torn between love and grift.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2008 | RJ Smith, RJ Smith is the author of "The Great Black Way: L.A. in the 1940s and the Lost African-American Renaissance." He is a senior editor at Los Angeles magazine.
Kinda blue is the shelf of jazz lit, where few writers have managed to keep their cool when engaging with the music. Jack Kerouac championed a spontaneous bop prosody, but plotted out or living in the moment, the prosody has rarely harmonized with the bop. John Clellon Holmes' "The Horn," a character study of a saxophonist, deserves respect, and Rafi Zabor's "The Bear Comes Home" has a shaggy, lovable soul.
NEWS
April 1, 1990 | ARLENE LEVINSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
John Silber's most distinctive feature is not his deformed right arm, a stump he learned to use as a weapon in schoolyard scraps. What is most physically striking are the furrows that crease his face, especially when he argues. And those furrows are likely to deepen in the coming weeks as this Kant scholar who whipped Boston University into shape goes after the Democratic nomination for governor of Massachusetts.
NEWS
February 27, 1990 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Whenever Boston University President John R. Silber opens his mouth in public these days, television cameras start rolling and reporters scoot a little closer to the edges of their seats. Considering that Silber has been a professional politician for only five weeks, and faces what appear to be almost insurmountable odds in his quest to become governor, it might seem a dream come true to have the news media hanging onto every utterance.
BOOKS
December 23, 2007 | Mark Lamster, Mark Lamster is writing a book about the political career of Peter Paul Rubens.
BACK in 1981, Tom Wolfe published the archetypal work of reactionary architectural criticism, "From Bauhaus to Our House," a happy-go-lucky evisceration of modern design and the men who brought it to America. Wolfe's short romp through history struck a nerve, but one close to the funny bone. Reviewing it in the Nation, critic Michael Sorkin quipped, "What Tom Wolfe doesn't know about modern architecture could fill a book. And so, indeed, it has, albeit a slim one."
BOOKS
October 8, 1989 | Robert Stevens, Robert Stevens, an English barrister, was educated at Oxford and Yale universities. Now an American citizen, he is professor of history and chancellor at the University of California, Santa Cruz
John Silber has become a celebrity. I am not certain what a celebrity is in our society, but surely someone who becomes a household name, at least to the readers of the Los Angeles Times (and more so to the readers of the New York Times, since he has been featured in The New York Times Magazine), surely must qualify as a celebrity. John Silber also is a university president. The number of university presidents who are thought of as celebrities is, understandably, small.
BOOKS
July 6, 2008 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Susan Salter Reynolds is a Times staff writer.
ONE OF the ways an author can really stretch and test the possibilities of fiction is by covering a great deal of ground -- the wide world. Joan Silber has set out to do this. "The Size of the World" moves from the United States to Vietnam to Thailand, back to the U.S., to Sicily and back to Thailand with dizzying fluidity. Silber weaves a web of characters that ties these places together.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2008 | RJ Smith, RJ Smith is the author of "The Great Black Way: L.A. in the 1940s and the Lost African-American Renaissance." He is a senior editor at Los Angeles magazine.
Kinda blue is the shelf of jazz lit, where few writers have managed to keep their cool when engaging with the music. Jack Kerouac championed a spontaneous bop prosody, but plotted out or living in the moment, the prosody has rarely harmonized with the bop. John Clellon Holmes' "The Horn," a character study of a saxophonist, deserves respect, and Rafi Zabor's "The Bear Comes Home" has a shaggy, lovable soul.
BOOKS
July 6, 2008 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Susan Salter Reynolds is a Times staff writer.
ONE OF the ways an author can really stretch and test the possibilities of fiction is by covering a great deal of ground -- the wide world. Joan Silber has set out to do this. "The Size of the World" moves from the United States to Vietnam to Thailand, back to the U.S., to Sicily and back to Thailand with dizzying fluidity. Silber weaves a web of characters that ties these places together.
BOOKS
December 23, 2007 | Mark Lamster, Mark Lamster is writing a book about the political career of Peter Paul Rubens.
BACK in 1981, Tom Wolfe published the archetypal work of reactionary architectural criticism, "From Bauhaus to Our House," a happy-go-lucky evisceration of modern design and the men who brought it to America. Wolfe's short romp through history struck a nerve, but one close to the funny bone. Reviewing it in the Nation, critic Michael Sorkin quipped, "What Tom Wolfe doesn't know about modern architecture could fill a book. And so, indeed, it has, albeit a slim one."
BOOKS
October 19, 2003 | Allen Barra, Allen Barra is a sports columnist for the Wall Street Journal.
Just when we thought Jules Tygiel's "Baseball's Great Experiment" and Arnold Rampersad's "Jackie Robinson" had told us everything we needed to know about the integration of baseball, out of left field and out of the blue comes the story of Lester Rodney. Oops -- correct field, wrong color. Rodney was and is an unapologetic communist (though he quit the party in 1958, when he finally accepted the evidence of Stalin's purges).
NEWS
April 1, 1990 | ARLENE LEVINSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
John Silber's most distinctive feature is not his deformed right arm, a stump he learned to use as a weapon in schoolyard scraps. What is most physically striking are the furrows that crease his face, especially when he argues. And those furrows are likely to deepen in the coming weeks as this Kant scholar who whipped Boston University into shape goes after the Democratic nomination for governor of Massachusetts.
NEWS
February 27, 1990 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Whenever Boston University President John R. Silber opens his mouth in public these days, television cameras start rolling and reporters scoot a little closer to the edges of their seats. Considering that Silber has been a professional politician for only five weeks, and faces what appear to be almost insurmountable odds in his quest to become governor, it might seem a dream come true to have the news media hanging onto every utterance.
BOOKS
October 19, 2003 | Allen Barra, Allen Barra is a sports columnist for the Wall Street Journal.
Just when we thought Jules Tygiel's "Baseball's Great Experiment" and Arnold Rampersad's "Jackie Robinson" had told us everything we needed to know about the integration of baseball, out of left field and out of the blue comes the story of Lester Rodney. Oops -- correct field, wrong color. Rodney was and is an unapologetic communist (though he quit the party in 1958, when he finally accepted the evidence of Stalin's purges).
NEWS
July 31, 2012 | By Jeff Spurrier
In the heart of the Wilshire Park historic district, Horacio Fuentes has built a garden with the feel of his native El Salvador. It begins by the sidewalk, where a pito coral tree grows, planted 15 years ago. It hasn't yet produced the dramatic red flowers that, when eaten, are said to prompt a deep sleep with intense, erotic dreams. Maybe it's too cold here, Fuentes said. He's had more success with his papayas. The plants are scattered around the frontyard, low enough to harvest, each with a cluster of ripening fruit pushing out from the main trunk.
BOOKS
October 8, 1989 | Robert Stevens, Robert Stevens, an English barrister, was educated at Oxford and Yale universities. Now an American citizen, he is professor of history and chancellor at the University of California, Santa Cruz
John Silber has become a celebrity. I am not certain what a celebrity is in our society, but surely someone who becomes a household name, at least to the readers of the Los Angeles Times (and more so to the readers of the New York Times, since he has been featured in The New York Times Magazine), surely must qualify as a celebrity. John Silber also is a university president. The number of university presidents who are thought of as celebrities is, understandably, small.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|