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ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2011 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
In a world that's constantly changing, it's good to know that some things basically stay the same — for example, the movie western. It's a genre that hasn't changed much in the last century of cinematic history: There are good guys and there are bad guys, horses and shootouts and probably a saloon or two. At the heart of any great western is the cowboy hero. Before there were such legendary movie cowboys as John Wayne, Roy Rogers, Gene Autry, Randolph Scott, Clint Eastwood and others, the Hollywood trail was paved by silent-era heroes, led by Gilbert M. "Broncho Billy" Anderson, William S. Hart and Tom Mix. Some of these early performers were true cowboys who did their own stunts.
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BUSINESS
August 9, 2013
A 1,100-pound bronze angel stands sentry at 7 Fountains, a community of 20 courtyard residences rooted in Hollywood history. The one- to four-story Spanish Revival-style villas are on the former site of the family compound of silent film-era director Irvin Willat. Location: 1414 N. Harper Ave., West Hollywood 90069 Asking price: $1.1 million to $1.65 million Year built: 2002 (interiors completed in 2013) Architect: Moule & Polyzoides Size: One to three bedrooms, home office/guest suite, 1.5 to 3.5 bathrooms, 1,311 to 2,211 interior square feet Site size: 30,400 square feet Features: Terra cotta and hand-painted inlay tile; custom wrought iron; thick plaster walls; wood-burning fireplaces; copper gutters; arched ceilings; private outdoor spaces that include yards, balconies, covered sleeping porches and roof decks;12,000 square feet of gardens and courtyards; fountains and trees.
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NEWS
August 18, 2005 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
ONE of the most intriguing programs in the UCLA Film and Television Archive's International Preservation series is tonight's presentation of three early Scandinavian silents. In 1910, Denmark's cinema arguably was the most sophisticated in the world, in no small measure because of Asta Nielsen, an actress with amazing naturalness and an equally impressive intensity.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
John Gilbert was the golden boy at MGM during the final years of the silent era. He was the young studio's biggest male star, working with such top directors as King Vidor ("The Big Parade," 1925), Erich von Stroheim ("The Merry Widow," 1925) and Tod Browning ("The Show," 1927). Gilbert was breathtakingly handsome with curly black hair and dancing eyes, and women swooned over his passionate love scenes and followed his well-publicized love affair with "Flesh and the Devil" leading lady Greta Garbo in the movie magazines.
MAGAZINE
April 22, 2001
In exploring the issue of respect and the Hollywood screenwriter ("Lip Service," March 25), Sean Mitchell neglects to mention the role of writers in film's silent period. Novelists, playwrights and scenarists played a crucial role in the early years of Hollywood. Many of the most powerful and highly paid screenwriters were women (Frances Marion, June Mathis and others), it was an era of bold experimentation in translating plays and novels to the screen (Erich von Stroheim's "Greed" and Mathis' "The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse")
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1987 | CHARLES SOLOMON
Animators began using cartoon mice during the early days of the medium, and have drawn them ever since, apparently from force of habit. Swarms of virtually identical mice infested the silent cartoons--especially Paul Terry's "Aesop's Fables." Everybody copied the Terry mice, even Walt Disney. (Ignatz in George Herriman's comic strip, "Krazy Kat," seems to have been the prototype for these pointy-nosed little rodents.
NEWS
October 16, 1993
Arthur Jacobson, 92, director and film industry executive for six decades. Beginning as a cameraman, Jacobson became an assistant director in the silent film era, frequently working with actress Clara Bow. Known for his ability to solve logistics problems, he assisted such directors as William Wellman and George Cukor and worked on such films as "A Farewell to Arms," "Miracle on 34th Street," "The Bridges of Toko-Ri" and "Camelot."
NEWS
April 22, 1999 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Buddy Rogers, the silent screen matinee idol and bandleader who spent half his life tending the lady and legend known as America's Sweetheart and the world's first real movie star, Mary Pickford, died Wednesday. He was 94. Rogers died at his home in Rancho Mirage, said his godson, Keith Lawrence.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1999 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kino on Video is ringing in the holiday season in complete silence with three restored vintage films from the 1920s. The best of the lot is the delightful 1924 version of James M. Barrie's beloved fantasy "Peter Pan" ($25 for VHS; $30 for DVD). Featuring the original color tinting and a new score by Philip Carli, this lavish Paramount production made a phenomenal $2 million the first weekend of its release 75 years ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
TWO silent rarities, "The Curse of Quon Gwon" and "Her Wild Oat," are on the bill Thursday in "Lost and Found," the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' periodic series showcasing recently discovered archival prints or films that have been recently restored from new materials. Programmer Randy Haberkamp expects an eclectic audience of not only traditional older fans of the silent-film form but a far younger crowd of aficionados.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Silent-film stars come in two categories: those everyone knows and those whose fame has diminished over the decades. Two new releases by Milestone Film & Video highlight one from each category. The silent-film star whose name has been inextricably linked to the era is Mary Pickford, generally considered the first actress whose fame went all around the world. "Rags and Riches: The Mary Pickford Collection" collects three of her most popular features: 1917's "The Poor Little Rich Girl," 1919's "The Hoodlum" and 1926's "Sparrows.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2012
He's not as well known as the three comedic giants of the silent era — Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton and Harold Lloyd — but Harry Langdon was nevertheless a superstar in the 1920s. Langdon (1884-1944) played an endearing, optimistic man-child who always wore a small cloth hat and oversized clothes. Among his classic features are "The Strong Man" and "Long Pants. " But his career plummeted after he decided to direct his own films, which were not generally well-received by critics and audiences.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2012
Friends and admirers of Marvin Hamlisch, including former President Bill Clinton and Liza Minnelli, gathered in New York on Tuesday to bid farewell to the celebrated songwriter hailed as "the people's composer. " Clinton called Hamlisch, whose casket was covered in his favorite yellow freesias, a "great, giving genius. " Howard Stringer, chairman ofSony Corp., called him "the merriest of minstrels. " Hamlisch died Aug. 6 in Los Angeles after a short illness. He was 68. Other guests included ex-Yankees Manager Joe Torre, Kelli O'Hara, Ann-Margret, Raul Esparza, Robert Klein, Brian Stokes Mitchell, Leslie Uggams, Richard Gere, Tony Danza, Kathie Lee Gifford and Diane Sawyer and her husband, Mike Nichols, the film and stage director.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2012 | By J. Michael Kennedy, Special to the Los Angeles Times
ISTANBUL, Turkey - The Turks have a blockbuster on their hands. It's called "Fetih 1453," as in the year the Turks conquered the Byzantine capital of Constantinople - now the sprawling city of Istanbul. This epic, with 16,000 extras, sword fights, tons of blood and turbans galore, has broken all film records in Turkey, not only in how much it cost to make ($17 million) - but also the box office take, more than double the investment and counting. Millions have seen the film since it opened in February - the premiere of which was an afternoon matinee that began at 14:53 p.m. in theaters around the country (the film opened Friday in Los Angeles)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2011 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Everywhere you looked in 2011 — and, more to the point, everywhere you listened — you could hear the sounds of a renewal of interest in silent films. The way Michel Hazanavicius' modern silent "The Artist" turned its rapturous festival appearances into Oscar contender status is the most obvious example, but it's far from the only one. For one thing, the life and career of French pioneer Georges Méliès (whose restored 1902 "A Trip to the Moon" was a hit at Cannes this year)
BUSINESS
September 28, 2011 | Richard Verrier
About 150 crew members, supported by three motor homes, a giant crane and 10 semi-trucks, huddled under downtown's 6th Street Bridge to film a "winter scene" on the Los Angeles River. Tampering with the river, which is regulated by the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, was off-limits. So producers of the "Batman" sequel "The Dark Knight Rises" built a platform over the riverbed designed with a special surface to make it look like ice. The sequence for the movie -- which is scheduled for release in theaters in July -- was part of a nighttime shoot that lighted up the industrial area, complete with fake snow, fireballs and plenty of billowing smoke.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2003 | Emanuel Levy, Special to The Times
Who could have predicted that, as cinema enters its second century, it shows signs of going back to its roots -- the silent era. Nearly 90 years after D.W. Griffith made his seminal epics, "The Birth of a Nation" and "Intolerance," and decades after Cecil B. DeMille titillated audiences with his sensational biblical spectacles, Hollywood shows a renewed interest in grandiose mass spectacles that approximate the aesthetics of silent films.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2011 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
In a world that's constantly changing, it's good to know that some things basically stay the same — for example, the movie western. It's a genre that hasn't changed much in the last century of cinematic history: There are good guys and there are bad guys, horses and shootouts and probably a saloon or two. At the heart of any great western is the cowboy hero. Before there were such legendary movie cowboys as John Wayne, Roy Rogers, Gene Autry, Randolph Scott, Clint Eastwood and others, the Hollywood trail was paved by silent-era heroes, led by Gilbert M. "Broncho Billy" Anderson, William S. Hart and Tom Mix. Some of these early performers were true cowboys who did their own stunts.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2011
Larry Semon The former newspaper cartoonist headlined countless silent slapstick shorts. He also starred in and directed the 1925 version of "The Wizard of Oz. " Harry Langdon The wide-eyed, childlike comic made three great features including 1926's "The Strong Man," before alienating his audience when he took creative control of his films. Charley Chase Besides directing, Chase headlined two-reel comedies such as the wonderful "Mighty Like Moose" until he died in 1940.
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