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Silent Majority

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 2000
The result of the recent election gives new meaning to the term "silent majority." LORRAINE SLATTERY Newbury Park
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
May 6, 2012 | By Alexandra Sandels, Los Angeles Times
BEIRUT - More than a year after the uprising began, only 50 people were still around to protest in a Syrian town of burned buildings and pockmarked storefronts. But for the residents of Anadan who came together to call for freedom and dignity on the morningSyria'scease-fire began last month, it was as though the revolution had begun again. "We were willing to come out like it was our first day," said Abu Ghaith, an activist in the town near Aleppo that rebels seized and lost again to government forces.
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NATIONAL
October 14, 2010 | By Faye Fiore and Mark Z. Barabak
Ann Quinn is in her red camp chair watching her 10-year-old son at Friday afternoon soccer practice. There's a bin of blue and gold hats in the back of her SUV and a big flag. When she isn't working full time at the local Navy base, she is cubmaster for her son's pack and a classroom volunteer at his school. If all that isn't enough, there is an election coming up next month and her husband, John, comes home most nights all spun up about what a lousy job President Obama and the Democrats are doing.
OPINION
September 27, 2011 | Jonah Goldberg
"You woke the bears! Why did you do that?" That's from one of my favorite scenes in "Anchorman. " In the Oscar-robbed film, Ron Burgundy (played by Will Ferrell) loudly leaps into a bear pit to rescue his girlfriend and then falsely blames her for waking them up. Watching President Obama these days reminds me of that scene. In March 2010, liberal columnist Peter Beinart argued that, for decades, Democratic politicians treated America's innate conservatism like a slumbering bear: If you make no sudden moves and talk quietly, you can get a lot done.
OPINION
March 30, 2005 | Chris Anderson, Chris Anderson is the editor in chief of Wired magazine and is writing a book on the shift from mass markets to niche markets. His blog is at www.thelongtail .com.
This week the Supreme Court received an avalanche of friend-of-the-court filings for its hearing of the Grokster case, which pits a peer-to-peer file-trading technology against MGM. Yet the outpouring of concern in the case only hints at the true number of interested parties. Two decades ago, when the famous Betamax case set a precedent that protected the VCR, it was consumers versus the studios and record labels.
NEWS
February 14, 1988 | Associated Press
President Kurt Waldheim was quoted today as saying he will not resign because a "great" and "silent" majority of Austrians supports him despite the furor over his World War II conduct. "I feel the group who makes the demand that I should resign is relatively small compared to those who want me to stay in office," the president said in an interview published in the tabloid Kurier.
NEWS
October 30, 2001 | TYLER MARSHALL and ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Pervez Musharraf is scheduled to begin a series of hastily arranged meetings with Pakistan's mainstream political parties today in an effort to contain pressure on his military government generated by the U.S.-led airstrikes on neighboring Afghanistan. Officials in the presidential office said Monday that Musharraf had extended invitations to representatives of all major parties, including the faction of the Pakistan Muslim League loyal to former Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif.
OPINION
September 27, 2011 | Jonah Goldberg
"You woke the bears! Why did you do that?" That's from one of my favorite scenes in "Anchorman. " In the Oscar-robbed film, Ron Burgundy (played by Will Ferrell) loudly leaps into a bear pit to rescue his girlfriend and then falsely blames her for waking them up. Watching President Obama these days reminds me of that scene. In March 2010, liberal columnist Peter Beinart argued that, for decades, Democratic politicians treated America's innate conservatism like a slumbering bear: If you make no sudden moves and talk quietly, you can get a lot done.
NEWS
December 5, 1992 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In her velvet-collared maroon winter coat and polished black shoes, Gabriella Hardwig was on the march with her husband and two small children. The family had driven 70 miles on a Sunday to take part in their first demonstration against right-wing extremism. "The government has done too little, so we came to say something with our presence," she said.
WORLD
May 6, 2012 | By Alexandra Sandels, Los Angeles Times
BEIRUT - More than a year after the uprising began, only 50 people were still around to protest in a Syrian town of burned buildings and pockmarked storefronts. But for the residents of Anadan who came together to call for freedom and dignity on the morningSyria'scease-fire began last month, it was as though the revolution had begun again. "We were willing to come out like it was our first day," said Abu Ghaith, an activist in the town near Aleppo that rebels seized and lost again to government forces.
NATIONAL
October 14, 2010 | By Faye Fiore and Mark Z. Barabak
Ann Quinn is in her red camp chair watching her 10-year-old son at Friday afternoon soccer practice. There's a bin of blue and gold hats in the back of her SUV and a big flag. When she isn't working full time at the local Navy base, she is cubmaster for her son's pack and a classroom volunteer at his school. If all that isn't enough, there is an election coming up next month and her husband, John, comes home most nights all spun up about what a lousy job President Obama and the Democrats are doing.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2009 | TINA DAUNT
Barack Obama may have put the spring back in America's step, but Debbie Allen has found a way to give it rhythm. The Emmy-, Golden Globe- and Tony Award-winning choreographer directed the music video -- which made its debut Tuesday on MySpace -- for newly released pop track "Obama Rock." (The video can be seen at www.thenotsosilent majority.com/privatelisten /obamarockvid.html.
OPINION
March 30, 2005 | Chris Anderson, Chris Anderson is the editor in chief of Wired magazine and is writing a book on the shift from mass markets to niche markets. His blog is at www.thelongtail .com.
This week the Supreme Court received an avalanche of friend-of-the-court filings for its hearing of the Grokster case, which pits a peer-to-peer file-trading technology against MGM. Yet the outpouring of concern in the case only hints at the true number of interested parties. Two decades ago, when the famous Betamax case set a precedent that protected the VCR, it was consumers versus the studios and record labels.
MAGAZINE
November 18, 2001 | STEVE BERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yolo County farmer Fritz Durst has been around guns all of his life. He takes his three preteen children out shooting. He owns two shotguns and five rifles, and he keeps one rifle in his pickup truck loaded and ready when he's on his farm in north-central California. Part of the off-the-grid camo crowd? Some kind of post-Sept. 11 militiaman? No way. The 42-year-old Durst has never owned a handgun; even a child with a squirt gun makes him squeamish.
NEWS
October 30, 2001 | TYLER MARSHALL and ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Pervez Musharraf is scheduled to begin a series of hastily arranged meetings with Pakistan's mainstream political parties today in an effort to contain pressure on his military government generated by the U.S.-led airstrikes on neighboring Afghanistan. Officials in the presidential office said Monday that Musharraf had extended invitations to representatives of all major parties, including the faction of the Pakistan Muslim League loyal to former Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 2000
The result of the recent election gives new meaning to the term "silent majority." LORRAINE SLATTERY Newbury Park
NEWS
September 25, 1994 | ARLENE LEVINSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The silent majority is mute no more. Citizens are yakking to the government and the news media, implored to share their opinions by toll-free telephone, computer and fax. Across the land, people hear the powerful begging: Talk to me--and talk and talk and talk. One day in June, CNN watchers catching the latest on the O. J. Simpson drama heard the news reader break her usual solemn demeanor and graciously say, "We're taking your calls."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1987
I for one did not vote for my representatives so they could hold inquisitions. It seems some people are trying to find fault with our President. Perhaps I'm one of the silent majority who certainly do not want communism in our hemisphere and we should do all we can to get communists out. HILDA E. GURNEY Woodland Hills
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1999 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
First produced in London in 1974, "Children" provided a glimpse of A.R. Gurney's world--and his talent--long before the playwright became famous. Typical of Gurney, "Children"--now at Pacific Resident Theatre--slices cleanly but deeply into the repressions of well-off Northeastern WASPs, with plenty of funny, often mordant moments arising naturally from a quartet of sharply drawn characterizations.
NEWS
September 25, 1994 | ARLENE LEVINSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The silent majority is mute no more. Citizens are yakking to the government and the news media, implored to share their opinions by toll-free telephone, computer and fax. Across the land, people hear the powerful begging: Talk to me--and talk and talk and talk. One day in June, CNN watchers catching the latest on the O. J. Simpson drama heard the news reader break her usual solemn demeanor and graciously say, "We're taking your calls."
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