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Silesia Poland

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November 2, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
West German Chancellor Helmut Kohl's long-delayed visit to Poland has been thrown into doubt again, this time by Kohl's wish to attend Mass at a controversial site. The visit, scheduled to begin Nov. 9, was conceived as a gesture of aid and reconciliation but has been postponed repeatedly because of wrangling here over the extent of the aid to be offered. Now the West Germans and the Poles are at odds over Kohl's plan to attend Mass at Annaberg, or St. Anne's Hill, in German-speaking Silesia.
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NEWS
November 2, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
West German Chancellor Helmut Kohl's long-delayed visit to Poland has been thrown into doubt again, this time by Kohl's wish to attend Mass at a controversial site. The visit, scheduled to begin Nov. 9, was conceived as a gesture of aid and reconciliation but has been postponed repeatedly because of wrangling here over the extent of the aid to be offered. Now the West Germans and the Poles are at odds over Kohl's plan to attend Mass at Annaberg, or St. Anne's Hill, in German-speaking Silesia.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2001 | MIKE BOEHM
The Orange County Jewish Film Festival opens Sunday at UC Irvine. The event, co-sponsored by UCI and University Synagogue of Irvine, consists of five screenings through May 9. The schedule: * "Simon Magus," a British film about a "holy fool" in 19th century Silesia, Poland, will be screened Sunday at 4 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 1999 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His career forged largely behind the Iron Curtain, New York Philharmonic music director Kurt Masur, 71, felt an intuitive understanding of the moral complexity in the music of Soviet composer Dmitri Shostakovich, one of the titans of the 20th century.
NEWS
December 31, 1991 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There will be no rending of the garments, no tears shed in Eastern Europe as the Soviet Union officially passes out of existence. In Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Bulgaria, Romania and what used to be East Germany, the satellite nations once lumped together as the Warsaw Pact--an alliance itself now on history's trash heap--a population of 115 million will say goodby without an ounce of regret.
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