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Silicon Studios

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BUSINESS
July 22, 1994 | AMY HARMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Silicon Graphics Inc., whose computer technology drives the digital special effects in "Forrest Gump," "True Lies" and nearly every other big summer movie, said Thursday that it is launching a subsidiary focusing on the entertainment industry. SGI Chairman Edward McCracken said the new division, Silicon Studios, is expected to double the Mountain View, Calif.-based firm's entertainment industry revenue to $400 million over the next year.
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BUSINESS
July 22, 1994 | AMY HARMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Silicon Graphics Inc., whose computer technology drives the digital special effects in "Forrest Gump," "True Lies" and nearly every other big summer movie, said Thursday that it is launching a subsidiary focusing on the entertainment industry. SGI Chairman Edward McCracken said the new division, Silicon Studios, is expected to double the Mountain View, Calif.-based firm's entertainment industry revenue to $400 million over the next year.
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BUSINESS
November 3, 1997 | KAREN KAPLAN
Eastman Kodak Co. is discontinuing its Cineon hardware product line, including scanners and recorders used to add digital special effects to film. Kodak's Hollywood-based Professional Motion Imaging division produced Cineon's Genesis scanners (which digitize images on film) and Cineon's Lightning recorders (which convert the images back onto film). Last month, company officials decided that the hardware business just isn't profitable.
BUSINESS
August 26, 1996 | KAREN KAPLAN, Karen Kaplan covers technology and careers
There's good news for kids (and for those who are kids at heart) addicted to high-performance CD-ROM video games: The thousands of hours spent trying to beat the bad guys and get to the next level are valuable experience for employment in the growing video game industry. Just ask Jeremy Airey, 23, whose parents used to complain that he was wasting his time playing video games. After he graduated from high school, Airey got a job testing games for bugs at Interplay Productions in Irvine.
BUSINESS
February 8, 1995 | AMY HARMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Predicting huge growth in the trendy new business of manufacturing digital illusions, Silicon Graphics Inc. said Tuesday that it plans to purchase two leading 3-D graphics software companies in a stock swap valued at about $500 million. In acquiring Alias Research Inc. and Wavefront Technologies Inc.
NEWS
September 12, 1995 | AMY HARMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first half of the 1990s brought us Siliwood, the concept. It was a big concept, the coming together of Silicon Valley and Hollywood, the merging of California's most celebrated industries into a whole that would be greater than the sum of its parts. But it is the remainder of the decade that will determine how Siliwood, the reality, will materialize and whether the cyber-age puree of technology and entertainment will make a difference to the state's economy and the lives of its residents.
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