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HOME & GARDEN
July 30, 1994 | JENE STONESIFER, TIMES-POST NEWS SERVICE
The fresh-flower arrangements that once adorned historic properties across the country have all but disappeared for reasons of authenticity and practicality. In their place, bouquets of silk flowers are brightening the carefully preserved interiors and adding a historical grace note to the houses.
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MAGAZINE
March 4, 2007 | Elizabeth Khuri
For the spring season, the Paris, Milan and New York runways were abloom with floral prints, silk flowers and gigantic constructed roses. On this coast, designers tempered the trend and created pieces suited for our natural landscape. Delicate garden prints, bold silhouettes and verdant-looking applique--often featuring the romantic rose--will keep you chic for any party, garden or otherwise. Actress Jacinda Barrett, whose career is in full bloom, models some choice designs.
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MAGAZINE
March 4, 2007 | Elizabeth Khuri
For the spring season, the Paris, Milan and New York runways were abloom with floral prints, silk flowers and gigantic constructed roses. On this coast, designers tempered the trend and created pieces suited for our natural landscape. Delicate garden prints, bold silhouettes and verdant-looking applique--often featuring the romantic rose--will keep you chic for any party, garden or otherwise. Actress Jacinda Barrett, whose career is in full bloom, models some choice designs.
HOME & GARDEN
October 16, 2003 | Adamo DiGregorio and David A. Keeps, Special to The Times
With hustling, bustling, warehouse-style stores and fewer places to park your wagon, shopping downtown is a more rugged adventure than on the mild, mild Westside. For design pros and dedicated do-it-yourselfers, however, the selection and savings on tabletop items, fine fabrics and all the trimmings are worth the trip. At Anzen Hardware (309 E. 1st St.
NEWS
October 27, 1992 | CONNIE KOENENN
Artificial flowers got their start in the 1940s in the millinery business as decorations for women's hats. Eventually hats went out of style, but the silk flowers stayed. * The 1950s ushered in big, bright plastic daisies and sunflowers. (They are now kitsch.) * Porcelain flowers were popular in the late '60s, but were high-priced and shattered easily. * By the 1980s, attempts to reproduce nature had improved with polished cotton and delicate-weave polyester blends.
HOME & GARDEN
October 16, 2003 | Adamo DiGregorio and David A. Keeps, Special to The Times
With hustling, bustling, warehouse-style stores and fewer places to park your wagon, shopping downtown is a more rugged adventure than on the mild, mild Westside. For design pros and dedicated do-it-yourselfers, however, the selection and savings on tabletop items, fine fabrics and all the trimmings are worth the trip. At Anzen Hardware (309 E. 1st St.
HOME & GARDEN
May 4, 1991 | SUSAN CHRISTIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last Christmas, Jean Moriarty gave herself a grand present--a new home wrapped in Yuletide adornment. There were stair rails laced with gold beads, china cabinets topped with silk burgundy roses and mantles draped with cedar boughs. "It looked like the Ritz-Carlton in here," she said. When the festive frills went into storage, Moriarty's spacious Mission Viejo home suddenly seemed a bit lackluster. "I thought, there's no reason to celebrate life only during the holidays," Moriarty said.
HOME & GARDEN
March 21, 1992 | From Associated Press
If you find fresh flowers too much fuss and freeze-dried flowers too much money, there are alternatives in silk or dried flowers. Silk flowers--actually, most are polyester these days--often are too perfect to look natural. But Charlotte Moss, a New York decorator and author of "A Passion for Detail," says that you can transform the harshly colored flowers into unusual specimens by dipping them in tea or in a solution of bleach and water or by embellishing them with paint.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1998 | LISA FERNANDEZ
The Simi Valley Adult School and Career Institute is offering six-week classes in English and in silk-flower design. In the flower class, students will learn to make centerpieces, topiaries, wreaths and decorative hats, in addition to learning how to dry flowers. The class will meet on consecutive Thursdays beginning this week from 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. or from 6 to 9 p.m. It costs $35 plus materials.
NEWS
April 10, 1992 | KATHRYN BOLD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On the wall above her work table, Mariaelena de Estevez Ruz has tacked up postcards of paintings by her favorite artists--Max Beckmann, Ernst Kirchner and other German Expressionists. "I like to be surrounded by art because it inspires me," she says. Estevez Ruz is an artist, too. She's not only a painter, but a sculptor of romantic, vintage-looking hats.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1998 | LISA FERNANDEZ
The Simi Valley Adult School and Career Institute is offering six-week classes in English and in silk-flower design. In the flower class, students will learn to make centerpieces, topiaries, wreaths and decorative hats, in addition to learning how to dry flowers. The class will meet on consecutive Thursdays beginning this week from 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. or from 6 to 9 p.m. It costs $35 plus materials.
HOME & GARDEN
July 30, 1994 | JENE STONESIFER, TIMES-POST NEWS SERVICE
The fresh-flower arrangements that once adorned historic properties across the country have all but disappeared for reasons of authenticity and practicality. In their place, bouquets of silk flowers are brightening the carefully preserved interiors and adding a historical grace note to the houses.
NEWS
October 27, 1992 | CONNIE KOENENN
Artificial flowers got their start in the 1940s in the millinery business as decorations for women's hats. Eventually hats went out of style, but the silk flowers stayed. * The 1950s ushered in big, bright plastic daisies and sunflowers. (They are now kitsch.) * Porcelain flowers were popular in the late '60s, but were high-priced and shattered easily. * By the 1980s, attempts to reproduce nature had improved with polished cotton and delicate-weave polyester blends.
NEWS
April 10, 1992 | KATHRYN BOLD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On the wall above her work table, Mariaelena de Estevez Ruz has tacked up postcards of paintings by her favorite artists--Max Beckmann, Ernst Kirchner and other German Expressionists. "I like to be surrounded by art because it inspires me," she says. Estevez Ruz is an artist, too. She's not only a painter, but a sculptor of romantic, vintage-looking hats.
HOME & GARDEN
March 21, 1992 | From Associated Press
If you find fresh flowers too much fuss and freeze-dried flowers too much money, there are alternatives in silk or dried flowers. Silk flowers--actually, most are polyester these days--often are too perfect to look natural. But Charlotte Moss, a New York decorator and author of "A Passion for Detail," says that you can transform the harshly colored flowers into unusual specimens by dipping them in tea or in a solution of bleach and water or by embellishing them with paint.
HOME & GARDEN
May 4, 1991 | SUSAN CHRISTIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last Christmas, Jean Moriarty gave herself a grand present--a new home wrapped in Yuletide adornment. There were stair rails laced with gold beads, china cabinets topped with silk burgundy roses and mantles draped with cedar boughs. "It looked like the Ritz-Carlton in here," she said. When the festive frills went into storage, Moriarty's spacious Mission Viejo home suddenly seemed a bit lackluster. "I thought, there's no reason to celebrate life only during the holidays," Moriarty said.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1987 | JOHN VOLAND, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Busy Houston homeowners are helping to redefine the eternal question: "What is art?" Beer cans and porcine paraphernalia are among the fripperies being affixed to Texas homes--and being praised in some quarters as a bold new form of environmental art. John Milkovisch covered his home with some 50,000 lovingly flattened aluminum beer cans, creating a multicolored patchwork quilt effect.
NEWS
August 28, 1992
Summer heat got you down? Break out of the doldrums by crafting a glorious summer hat. "Even if you don't like to wear them, hats are fun to create and look wonderful hanging on the wall or on the corner of a vanity mirror," said Jane Elliott of Cottage Flowers and Backdoor Studio in Newport Beach, who has been making hats since the '40s. DESIGNING WITH RIBBONS Select a lightweight straw hat in cool white or pastel shades. Elliott finds hers in antique shops, flea markets and variety stores.
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