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Silly Season

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SPORTS
October 13, 1996 | MIKE HARRIS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
With three races remaining on the 1996 NASCAR Winston Cup schedule, the silly season is pretty much over. The silly season is what many people call the speculation and uproar caused by anticipated driver and team changes. It generally begins about midseason, but started much earlier this year.
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NEWS
February 8, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
The president is firing marshmallows across the East Room. Michelle Obama is engaged in a tug of war in the Diplomatic Reception Room. Just what is going on at the White House these days? It turns out that the administration's goal of boosting vocations in the fields of math, science and engineering isn't the sexiest topic for reporters covering the White House. And the first lady's push for healthy eating and exercise is hardly a new story. So, the first couple is shedding some of the formality of their posts to generate new interest for some of their pet projects.
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OPINION
September 13, 2011
California has two legislative seasons. The first, with its six months of public hearings, debates, deliberations, deadlines and light-of-day voting, is for suckers. Capitol players wait for the 96 frenzied hours that follow Labor Day. That's when lobbyists and lawmakers get together for a private carnival of fundraisers, backroom horse-trading, promises and threats. The rest of us must spend the following weeks sifting through the vacant Capitol floor's debris to determine just what the Legislature dreamed up and adopted at the last minute.
OPINION
September 13, 2011
California has two legislative seasons. The first, with its six months of public hearings, debates, deliberations, deadlines and light-of-day voting, is for suckers. Capitol players wait for the 96 frenzied hours that follow Labor Day. That's when lobbyists and lawmakers get together for a private carnival of fundraisers, backroom horse-trading, promises and threats. The rest of us must spend the following weeks sifting through the vacant Capitol floor's debris to determine just what the Legislature dreamed up and adopted at the last minute.
SPORTS
April 30, 2000 | JIM HODGES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's called the "silly season" and it gets sillier and sillier, according to Robert Yates, owner of the Winston Cup cars driven by series champion Dale Jarrett and Ricky Rudd. Also according to Todd Parrott, whose rumored departure as Jarrett's crew chief prompted Yates, Jarrett and Parrott to try to put out a fire Saturday.
NEWS
February 8, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
The president is firing marshmallows across the East Room. Michelle Obama is engaged in a tug of war in the Diplomatic Reception Room. Just what is going on at the White House these days? It turns out that the administration's goal of boosting vocations in the fields of math, science and engineering isn't the sexiest topic for reporters covering the White House. And the first lady's push for healthy eating and exercise is hardly a new story. So, the first couple is shedding some of the formality of their posts to generate new interest for some of their pet projects.
BUSINESS
January 30, 1991 | PAUL SAFFO, PAUL SAFFO is a research fellow at the Institute for the Future in Menlo Park.
New Year's is over, but consumer behavior and marketing analysts needn't put the party hats away just yet. Jan. 1 opened the final decade before the end of the millennium. Historically, we are in for a 10-year "silly season" that will build in intensity as we approach the year 2000. The end of a decade typically serves up popular fads such as the "Age of Aquarius" of the late '60s, but the twin zeros of a century can deliver more lasting social phenomena.
NEWS
September 20, 1996 | FAYE FIORE
The phones are not ringing in Rep. Zoe Lofgren's office. There are no lobbyists prowling the corridors outside her door, no savory pieces of legislation simmering in Congress. Her body is neatly outfitted in a navy blue suit in her Capitol Hill office, but her head is back in her San Jose district, where she clearly would rather be right now, getting some work done. It didn't begin this way, this 104th Congress.
OPINION
October 5, 1997 | Marc B. Haefele, Marc B. Haefele is a staff writer and columnist at L.A. Weekly
A woman best known to TV news viewers for her frog-suited protests against wetland development has attacked the ecological record of the major backer of the proposed downtown sports arena. Representatives of an inner-city Sierra Club chapter asked, more seriously, why the arena backers didn't foresee the project's effects on the surrounding poor neighborhoods.
SPORTS
August 13, 1999
It gets sillier and sillier, earlier and earlier, this quest for the right combination to get around the track or down the strip quicker than anybody else. The formula is simple enough: money plus equipment plus crew plus driver equal winning, which brings more money, etc., in a circle that is becoming increasingly vicious, if you buy the thinking of those who see themselves as victims of the process.
SPORTS
December 25, 2007 | John Weyler, Times Staff Writer
A Framingham, Mass., attorney thinks the hoopla surrounding baseball's steroids scandal is a joke. In fact, he thinks sports fans should be upset that baseball is trying to stop its players from taking performance-enhancing drugs. Rob Meltzer, writing in Framingham's MetroWest Daily News, contends that regulating what athletes put in their bodies is "government by nanny." "For their money, the fans are entitled to the best show that organized athletics can offer.
SPORTS
November 12, 2007 | Peter Yoon, Times Staff Writer
Jeffrey Jordan might be the most talked about walk-on player in college basketball history. That's because the 6-foot-1 guard for Illinois is the son of Michael Jordan. Yes, the Michael Jordan. The younger Jordan made his college debut Sunday. He played three minutes and missed his only shot attempt in a 63-55 victory over Northeastern.
OPINION
August 5, 2007
This has not been an easy summer for Los Angeles' elected leaders. Two citywide officeholders have been involved in messy personal scandals with some spillover into their work, and one of the county's five supervisors now finds herself embarrassed by a professional lapse. We offer here a summary of the recent meltdown, along with our recommendations for those involved.
OPINION
February 9, 2007
IN CASE YOU WERE worried that the 110th Congress was producing debate of too much substance, this week House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-San Francisco) stands accused of everything from hypocrisy on global warming to wrongheadedness about Iraq -- all based on a request she never exactly made for a jumbo-sized military jet that she has never actually flown aboard as speaker. The fuss started last week, but conservatives waited until Wednesday to really let loose the dogs of warp.
SPORTS
November 25, 2005 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
Just because the PGA Tour tournament schedule is complete, do not be fooled into thinking that the year is over -- not with $18.45 million at stake in nine so-called "silly season" events. In the first place, there's nothing silly about that much money, it's just that the millions being passed out starting this week, at the PGA Grand Slam of Golf in Hawaii and the Merrill Lynch Skins Game in La Quinta, do not count toward official money winnings.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2004 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
Alcoholic and despondent, the great country singer Hank Williams often needed to be driven around to be sobered up. On one such drive, or so the story goes, Williams wanted his fellow travelers to join him in singing his classic hymn "I Saw the Light." "So we started singing it," performer Minnie Pearl told biographer Roger M. Williams. "All of a sudden Hank stopped, and he cried out: 'That's the trouble. It's all dark. There ain't no light.'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1990
This is that season when days and campaigns grow short. Something about it makes our politics and our politicians, well, silly. Herewith, then, vignettes of the week just past. No endorsement expressed or implied. No significance alleged--beyond the comedic: ACROBATS: Dan Quayle, Vice President of the United States, came to Orange County Thursday and promptly endorsed the term limits contained in Prop. 140. That measure was written by four-time L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2004 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
Alcoholic and despondent, the great country singer Hank Williams often needed to be driven around to be sobered up. On one such drive, or so the story goes, Williams wanted his fellow travelers to join him in singing his classic hymn "I Saw the Light." "So we started singing it," performer Minnie Pearl told biographer Roger M. Williams. "All of a sudden Hank stopped, and he cried out: 'That's the trouble. It's all dark. There ain't no light.'
SPORTS
January 7, 2004 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
It's early January, it's the tropics, and there hasn't been an event with PGA Tour players in a little more than three weeks, so you know what that means. It's time to start all over again, shake off the rust that has been allowed to collect on these pros since mid-December and watch them kick off the 2004 season. Here on the northwest coast of Maui, the $5.3-million Mercedes Championships starts Thursday -- the first tournament of the new year, soon to be followed by 47 more.
SPORTS
December 22, 2002 | From Associated Press
The silly season is no longer just for fun. In the six weeks since the PGA Tour season officially ended at the Tour Championship, there have been 11 tournaments around the world with prize money topping $22 million. The total purse on the PGA Tour wasn't that high 20 years ago, when the Skins Game was created and paved the way for the silly season -- events that don't count toward the world ranking or history but offer money that still spends the same.
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