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NEWS
May 22, 1988 | KATHERINE M. GRIFFIN, Times Staff Writer
When Half Moon Bay fisherman Steve Fitz returns phone calls these days, he identifies himself as "former fisherman, current dump site director." Fitz, spokesman for the Half Moon Bay Fishermen's Marketing Assn., is only half joking. He still makes his living fishing for dungenness crab and dover, rex and petrale sole in the ocean waters off picturesque Half Moon Bay, 20 miles south of San Francisco.
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NATIONAL
September 18, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
EVANS, Colo. - The panicked escapes that took place in this riverside town last week were worth it: The trailer parks that frame the shoreline of the swollen South Platte now sit smashed and throttled by mud. And not just any mud. When the flood claimed the nearby wastewater treatment plant too, officials and residents worried that the deluged edges of Evans had turned into a toxic open sewer. "In our living room, there's 6 to 8 inches of pure, black mud," said Karen Kesterson, 68. "You just kind of slide around in it. " Colorado's epic rains brought more than just broken timber and broken homes.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 2010 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
On a southern-facing slope of the San Gabriel Mountains, Glen Owens strode through the dappled sunlight of century-old oaks and sycamores that the Los Angeles County Department of Public Works wants to replace with muck dredged from a nearby reservoir. Eyeing the trees marked for removal with strips of black and white ribbons nailed to their trunks, Owens shook his head in dismay. "I've got the same feeling I get when I see cattle on their way to slaughter," he said. "Don't get me wrong ?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
More than 90 years ago the San Clemente Dam rose on what John Steinbeck called in a novel "a lovely little river" that "has everything a river should have. " These days, that's not so true of the Carmel River, which empties into the Pacific Ocean just south of Carmel. The river is overpumped. Flood plain has been lost to development, and the silted-up San Clemente is vulnerable to collapse in an earthquake, threatening 1,500 downstream structures. But next month, in what officials say is the state's largest-ever dam removal, work will begin on a three-year project to dismantle the 106-foot-tall concrete dam and reroute half a mile of the river.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1985 | KRISTINA LINDGREN, Times Staff Writer
On the upper reaches of one of California's last surviving coastal wetlands, hulking earthmovers prowl like dinosaurs, gouging deep channels into wet silt. The sight of these mechanical monsters crisscrossing the pocked landscape with tons of dirt in their maws has raised fears that at last development would spoil the 10-year-old ecological reserve. One ardent bird watcher nearly careened off Jamboree Road recently at the sight, threw up his hands and said: "That's it! They've finally done it!
NEWS
November 17, 1994 | RON RUSSELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An effort by the Army Corps of Engineers to remove 135,000 cubic yards of contaminated silt and sand from the entrance to Marina del Rey is seriously off schedule, and engineers now expect to fall far short of their goal, a county official said this week. "At this point, it's going very, very slowly," said James A. Fawcett, chief of planning for the county Department of Beaches and Harbors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1994 | RON RUSSELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Concerned that silting at the mouth of Marina del Rey could choke off boating, Los Angeles County officials propose to haul tons of contaminated silt and sand to the Port of Los Angeles to use as fill for a new marine wildlife habitat. The plan calls for the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 2000 | HECTOR BECERRA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has fined Orange County and a contractor $735,000 for ocean dumping violations, the second-largest such penalty ever levied against a public agency in the country. The violations occurred during a massive two-year dredging operation in Upper Newport Bay when the sludge was taken to sea and dumped at least half a mile from the designated site.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2000
Re "Removal of Matilija Dam," Ventura County letters, April 23. I agree with Mike McGarry's proposal to use Navy Seabees to remove Matilija Dam if removal is found to be the best solution to the problems of silt collection and limited access by steelhead trout. Instead of dam removal, I propose that sand and silt be dredged from above the dam to downstream so it could follow its normal course to replenish beaches. Installation of fish ladders would provide access upstream to the trout.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 1985
Agoura Hills homeowners who drained their neighborhood recreation lake 10 months ago so they could bulldoze tons of silt and debris from its 13.5-acre bottom will celebrate the end of their $471,000 cleanup with champagne and cake today. Instead of sunny weather, residents in the 1,000-house Lake Lindero area will be hoping for rain during their noontime party. They have optimistically scheduled the celebration indoors at the Lake Lindero Country Club.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 2010 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
On a southern-facing slope of the San Gabriel Mountains, Glen Owens strode through the dappled sunlight of century-old oaks and sycamores that the Los Angeles County Department of Public Works wants to replace with muck dredged from a nearby reservoir. Eyeing the trees marked for removal with strips of black and white ribbons nailed to their trunks, Owens shook his head in dismay. "I've got the same feeling I get when I see cattle on their way to slaughter," he said. "Don't get me wrong ?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2009 | Associated Press
A plan to cap a vast, long-neglected deposit of the pesticide DDT on the ocean floor off Southern California got its first public airing Tuesday -- nearly four decades after the poison was banned from use. The estimated $36-million proposal by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency calls for a cover of sand and silt to be placed over the most contaminated part of the estimated 17-square-mile area declared a Superfund site in 1996.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 2009 | Jeff Gottlieb
The federal Environmental Protection Agency on Thursday proposed spending at least $36 million to clean up the world's largest deposit of banned pesticide DDT, which lies 200 feet underwater off the Palos Verdes Peninsula. Montrose Chemical Corp., which was based near Torrance, released 110 tons of DDT and 10 tons of toxic PCBs into the sewers from 1947 through 1971. The chemicals then flowed into the Pacific.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2006 | Ashley Powers, Times Staff Writer
At least 60 miles from the coast, where the San Bernardino Mountains shoot through clouds, a signpost painted on a weather-beaten water tower beckons like a desert oasis: Mentone Beach. The same two words adorn a gas station, a liquor store and a car repair shop on the main drag, Highway 38, promising cool water in a place where stepping outside feels like stepping into a blast furnace.
NEWS
December 11, 2005 | Angela Doland, Associated Press Writer
While much of the world worries about how to stop sea levels from rising, engineers in this corner of France want to spend $260 million to do just the opposite: raise the tides to preserve the environs of a national treasure. With its Gothic abbey soaring 558 feet above a mostly flat, nondescript Normandy landscape, Mont St.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2005 | Sara Lin, Times Staff Writer
On any given morning, bird watchers and plein-air artists admire the Upper Newport Bay and its avian denizens. Joggers and cyclists pause to take it all in, and kayakers paddle through the shallow water. Aside from the occasional passing airplane, the trill of birds dominates the soundscape. But something is wrong. Silt-laden urban runoff from San Diego Creek has clogged the bay, forming mudflats that choke out the tides.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1999 | JEAN O. PASCO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Crews dredging Upper Newport Bay dropped 600,000 cubic yards of silt in the wrong spot off the coast before discovering the error late last month, triggering an investigation by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The misplaced muck was equivalent in volume to 300,000 refrigerators or 60,000 dump-truck loads, EPA officials said Tuesday. "This was a lot of material," said Brian Ross, dredging projects coordinator for the EPA in San Francisco.
NEWS
September 26, 1985 | VICTOR VALLE, Times Staff Writer
The county would provide $250,000 and help restore a healthy environment for the wild trout native to the San Gabriel River's West Fork under a proposed settlement of a civil suit over a 1981 fish kill. But even before it is signed, the proposal has drawn opposition from two sport fishing organizations concerned that it does not include enough protections to ensure that the trout can once again thrive in the West Fork.
NATIONAL
November 25, 2004 | From Associated Press
Scientists said Wednesday that changes in the Colorado River were already apparent as a Grand Canyon flooding experiment began winding down. The controlled flooding, aimed at restoring the canyon's fragile ecosystem, began Sunday morning as the federal Bureau of Reclamation opened four giant steel tubes at Glen Canyon Dam, sending a torrent of water into the river. The experiment was to end early today. Though scientists say the findings are still preliminary, changes to the river were visible.
NEWS
June 20, 2004 | Miranda Leitsinger, Associated Press Writer
After resisting Siamese invaders for years, Cambodia's greatest city and civilization -- temple-studded Angkor -- was dealt a death blow with its final sacking in 1431. At least, that's what the history books say. But an international research team now thinks that its demise was set much earlier, by something that is the bane of many modern urban societies -- ecological failure and infrastructure breakdown.
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