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Silver Lake Ca Development And Redevelopment

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1996
Dana Hollister, a developer and designer, wants to transform the vacant estate at the top of Micheltorena Street in Silver Lake into a urban getaway: an exclusive, 35-room hotel with a spa, restaurant and 360-degree view. Her plans have been rejected twice by city officials, but a hearing is set for Nov. 19 before the Board of Zoning Appeals. Hollister believes she is close to making sure that all the neighbors who live around the 4 1/2-acre property will be content with her latest plans.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1996
Dana Hollister, a developer and designer, wants to transform the vacant estate at the top of Micheltorena Street in Silver Lake into a urban getaway: an exclusive, 35-room hotel with a spa, restaurant and 360-degree view. Her plans have been rejected twice by city officials, but a hearing is set for Nov. 19 before the Board of Zoning Appeals. Hollister believes she is close to making sure that all the neighbors who live around the 4 1/2-acre property will be content with her latest plans.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1993 | ROBIN GREENE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Silver Lake Recreation Center is a small, run-down and vaguely Spanish-style building plopped in the middle of a well-kept neighborhood of vintage Los Angeles homes. Children flock to the center for T-ball and peewee baseball, and its small-scale playground is custom-made for kids in the barely walking, into-everything stage. "I like this little building," Darcee Olson said on a recent Saturday as she watched her year-old twins, Alec and Theo, tottering in the sand.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1993 | ROBIN GREENE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Silver Lake Recreation Center is a small, run-down and vaguely Spanish-style building plopped in the middle of a well-kept neighborhood of vintage Los Angeles homes. Children flock to the center for T-ball and peewee baseball, and its small-scale playground is custom-made for kids in the barely walking, into-everything stage. "I like this little building," Darcee Olson said on a recent Saturday as she watched her year-old twins, Alec and Theo, tottering in the sand.
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