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ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2010
Filmmaker David Lynch's daughter Jennifer Lynch, Film Threat magazine's Chris Gore and Devo's Jerry Casale will serve as judges at the International Surrealist Film Festival , a celluloid celebration of the weird, wonderful and just plain nuts. A 16-millimeter Bolex movie camera will be awarded to the strangest film. The Downtown Independent, 251 S. Main St., L.A. 8-11 p.m. Sun. $10. (213) 617-1033. www.theinternationalsurrealistfilmfestival.com.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
Sony Pictures is close to a deal with bestselling author Michael Lewis to bring his latest book, a Wall Street drama and detective story, to the silver screen. “Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt,” recounts how a group of misfit stock brokers and techies worked to expose, and then fight back, against the tactics of high-frequency traders, or HFTs. The HFTs were able to exploit computer technology and millisecond advantages to make huge profits at the expense of regular investors.
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OPINION
February 6, 2014
Re "Better history through storytelling," Opinion, Feb. 3 Nicholas Meyer thinks that "no one learns history (or civics, remember them?) anymore. " He blames the "dismantled" school system and says movies that are based on history but alter facts are picking up the slack. The same complaint appeared in the New York Times - on April 4, 1943, in an article with the title, "Ignorance of U.S. History Shown by College Freshmen. " It reported that only 25% of the students knew that Abraham Lincoln was the president during the Civil War and that only 15% knew where Portland, Ore., was. In 1930, Thomas Briggs of Columbia Teachers College reported that high school students had no idea who Solon was and were unable to define the Monroe Doctrine.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
If you've raised kids in the last 15 years or so, you've probably taken a trip or two into the scary (but not overwhelmingly so) mind of the writer R.L. Stine. Stine's “Goosebumps” series is a collection of ghost and horror stories for young children. Since Stine published the first “Goosebumps” in 1992, it's become the first book series many parents purchase for their kids. Now “Goosebumps” is set for the silver screen, with Jack Black starring and a March 2016 release date.
OPINION
February 15, 2014
Re "History lessons, with popcorn," Opinion, Feb. 12 Zach P. Messitte is spot-on regarding the influence that films with historical backgrounds have on today's college students. Since 1991 I've been teaching at USC's School of Cinematic Arts. I've witnessed many changes there, both in technology and student attitudes, particularly when a historical incident is adapted into a film. In my generation I saw how films like "Apocalypse Now" and "The Deer Hunter" affected American audiences regarding Vietnam.
NEWS
November 15, 2012 | By Hugh Hart
"Getting old is not for sissies. " That's a Bette Davis line, as quoted by a retired singer in Dustin Hoffman's directorial debut, "Quartet," but the world-weary wisecrack serves equally well as subtext for a bittersweet batch of new films that examine something that has been largely missing from the big screen: the aging process. At 82, Christopher Plummer's Oscar-winning turn in 2010's "Beginners" stood as something of an anomaly. This year, the "senior cinema" entries have grown to include two late-spring releases: Clint Eastwood's grumpy-old-man showcase "Trouble With the Curve" and the surprise hit "The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel," in which Maggie Smith, Judi Dench and Bill Nighy appear as British pensioners in chaotic India.
NEWS
November 25, 2004 | Roy Rivenburg
While other poultry end up as dinner this holiday season, the AFLAC duck will be angling for an Oscar. After months of negotiations with Paramount Pictures, the insurance company spokesduck has landed a cameo role in the new Jim Carrey film, "Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events." The idea came from director Brad Silberling, who wanted to add a moment of comic relief to an intense scene, said Al Johnson, AFLAC's vice president of advertising and branding.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1987 | STEVE HOCHMAN, Popline is a periodic Calendar feature that spotlights people who are making news in pop. and
Three questions commonly asked by people who have seen Howard Huntsberry's portrayal of soul singer Jackie Wilson in the movie "La Bamba": 1--Can he really sing like Wilson? 2--Does he really look like Wilson? 3--Who the heck is this guy, anyway? The answers: 1--Yes, even his speaking voice recalls the mellifluousness of Wilson's bubbly lilt.
NEWS
August 20, 1990 | BETTY GOODWIN
"I always thought it would be at drive-ins," Gene Kelly quipped before a weekend screening of "Singin' in the Rain" on the giant silver screen, as they say, at the Hollywood Bowl. It was a far cry from watching a movie at a drive-in, or for that matter, your local multiplex cinema. "It's a kick," said Debbie Reynolds, Kelly's co-star in the 1952 musical classic, screened Friday night for the first "Old-Fashioned Night at the Movies" program.
BUSINESS
June 5, 1985
The Massachusetts secretary of state's office, which last week issued a cease-and-desist order against the sale of a Silver Screen limited partnership offering by E. F. Hutton & Co., announced a settlement with Silver Screen requiring the reimbursement of $4.8 million in sales and interest payments to 700 Massachusetts investors. The partnership, designed to raise film financing for Walt Disney Productions, raised more than $150 million nationwide.
OPINION
February 15, 2014
Re "History lessons, with popcorn," Opinion, Feb. 12 Zach P. Messitte is spot-on regarding the influence that films with historical backgrounds have on today's college students. Since 1991 I've been teaching at USC's School of Cinematic Arts. I've witnessed many changes there, both in technology and student attitudes, particularly when a historical incident is adapted into a film. In my generation I saw how films like "Apocalypse Now" and "The Deer Hunter" affected American audiences regarding Vietnam.
OPINION
February 6, 2014
Re "Better history through storytelling," Opinion, Feb. 3 Nicholas Meyer thinks that "no one learns history (or civics, remember them?) anymore. " He blames the "dismantled" school system and says movies that are based on history but alter facts are picking up the slack. The same complaint appeared in the New York Times - on April 4, 1943, in an article with the title, "Ignorance of U.S. History Shown by College Freshmen. " It reported that only 25% of the students knew that Abraham Lincoln was the president during the Civil War and that only 15% knew where Portland, Ore., was. In 1930, Thomas Briggs of Columbia Teachers College reported that high school students had no idea who Solon was and were unable to define the Monroe Doctrine.
NEWS
February 5, 2014 | By Jay Jones
Couples and singles are sure to find romance in the air in Sin City on Valentine's weekend kicking off on Feb. 14, a Friday. Cupid may be loading his arrows during a “Date-A-Thon” at The D , downtown Las Vegas' newest hotel-casino. From 6-9 p.m. on Feb. 14, the resort hopes to break the record for the world's largest speed dating event. Each participant will “date” 24 people for three minutes apiece in hopes of finding a mate. The event is free, but pre-registration  is required.
AUTOS
May 14, 2013 | By David Undercoffler
Even the casual car fan s who helped push "The Great Gatsby" to a $51.1-million opening weekend probably noticed the Duesenberg Model J driven by Leonardo DiCaprio's title character. The more chronologically inclined car fans may have also noticed that despite the book and film taking place in 1922, the bright-yellow Duesenberg was built in 1929. Such an oversight is common with films that are set in a particular time when a car may match the general period but not the actual dates.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2013 | By Holly Myers
In "Double Feature," his first exhibition with Honor Fraser, Mario Ybarra Jr. explores the probably universal impulse toward cinematic identification, playing with the ways in which we project ourselves into the roles we encounter on the silver screen - or the flickering pixels of late-night television, as the case may be. The work is not especially subtle. In "Transformer, " a short video projected in the back gallery, the artist offers a decidedly hammy performance combining elements of "An American Werewolf in London" with Michael Jackson's "Thriller . " A series of large, occasionally garish self-portraits in the front room depicts Ybarra in the iconic roles of Dr. Jekyll, Mr. Hyde, the Invisible Man, and the Creature from the Black Lagoon.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
I abhor violence. As a rookie police reporter years ago I saw the damage guns, knives, broken bottles, metal pipes, hands - humans - can inflict. From the terrifyingly premeditated to the unfortunately accidental, those images still have the power to shake me to the core. They will never leave me. I don't, however, believe the movies are to blame for these acts. As good as Hollywood is at reimagining the intrinsic brutality that roams our streets, burrows into twisted minds, plays havoc with our world, nothing I've seen in movies comes close to what I witnessed firsthand.
OPINION
December 26, 2012
Re "Firm lobbies, wins state work," Dec. 23 Deloitte Consulting invested (the polite term) $2.2 million in the California political system over the last 10 years and has won contracts worth more than $540 million over that time. Hundreds of millions of those dollars were for projects that were either over budget or abandoned. Deloitte's chump-change investment earned a return of at least 24,545%. To those voters who think public financing of elections is too expensive, I say, think again.
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