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Silver Screen Partners Iii

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BUSINESS
February 25, 1991 | From United Press International
Songwriter Sues Over Disney Film: Victor Cesario sued Alan Silvestri and producers of the film "Who Framed Roger Rabbit? ," alleging that Silvestri used Cesario's music in the film. The U.S. District Court lawsuit alleges that Cesario had Silvestri arrange a 1974 composition he wrote, "Let's Start Out, Where It Ended."
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BUSINESS
February 25, 1991 | From United Press International
Songwriter Sues Over Disney Film: Victor Cesario sued Alan Silvestri and producers of the film "Who Framed Roger Rabbit? ," alleging that Silvestri used Cesario's music in the film. The U.S. District Court lawsuit alleges that Cesario had Silvestri arrange a 1974 composition he wrote, "Let's Start Out, Where It Ended."
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BUSINESS
February 3, 1987
Hutton said it raised the money in the public offering of Silver Screen Partners III, the largest limited partnership it had ever sold, and said it is the largest partnership formed to finance movie production. A previous offering, Silver Screen II, raised $193 million for film production at Walt Disney Co. in 1985.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 1987 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
As W. C. Fields might have cautioned us, no one steals a movie scene like a well-lit baby. And, in "Three Men and a Baby" (citywide), both the babies and the lighting are expert. Twins Lisa and Michelle Blair--jointly playing a infant left unexpectedly on the doorstep of three swinging New York bachelors--coo, bat their eyes, clap and soil their surroundings with eerie expertise.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 1987 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
Personality can carry you a long way--and, for stretches of the new teen comedy "Adventures in Babysitting" (citywide), personality is what keeps it all afloat. It's one of those movies that, however well it works now, might have been pretty bad with a different cast and director. It doesn't really transcend its genre; it just stretches it in amusing and sometimes surprising ways.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1988 | SHEILA BENSON, Times Film Critic
"Big Business" (citywide) is a bright whirligig of a movie, but reading any description of its plot set-up--twins upon twins, both sets with the same two names--is enough to put you in your hammock with a sick headache. Don't fret; as you watch its buoyant hilarity, the intricacies flow smoothly as honey off a spoon. Like a sensational party the night before, "Big Business" may not bear the closest scrutiny in the cold light of day, but it gives an irresistible glow at the time.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1988 | SHEILA BENSON, Times Film Critic
What's amazing about "Who Framed Roger Rabbit" (selected theaters), a sort of inked-in film noir with outrageous sight gags, is how quickly we begin to accept the miracle in front of our eyes. In less than four minutes we are introduced to a hapless "actor," the (very) animated R. Rabbit himself, driving his human director nuts because Roger sees tweeting birds instead of stars when a refrigerator drops on his head.
BUSINESS
May 21, 1992 | KATHRYN HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Since new management was installed at Walt Disney Co. in 1984, no other studio has matched its track record in raising money for film production. Disney raised nearly $1.5 billion from 1985 through 1990 through a series of limited partnerships. The most recent--Touchwood Pacific Partners I--raised $600 million. That's enough for about two years' worth of movie production, or 20 to 30 films.
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