Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSilver Spoon
IN THE NEWS

Silver Spoon

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 19, 2012 | By Michael McGough
President Obama got a rise out of Mitt Romney with the campaign-trail observation that "I wasn't born with a silver spoon in my mouth. " Romney saw the remark (plausibly) as an attack on him and (not so plausibly, but ingeniously) as an attack on Romney's rags-to-Rambler father. "I'm certainly not going to apologize for my dad and his success in life ," Romney harrumphed. "He was born poor. He worked his way to become very successful despite the fact that he didn't have a college degree, and one of the things he wanted to do was to provide for me and my brother and sisters.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 20, 2012 | By Michael Kinsley
"I am being sunk by a society that demands success when all I can offer is failure," says the ruined theater impresario Max Bialystock in Mel Brooks' "The Producers. " Mitt Romney sees things differently. As he sees it, he is offering success to a society that seems to actually prefer failure. "If people think there's something wrong with being successful in America, then they'd better vote for the other guy, because I've been extraordinarily successful, and I want to use that success and that know-how to help the American people.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 19, 2012 | By Maeve Reston
CLEVELAND - President Obama did not mention Mitt Romney by name when he campaigned here in Lorain County on Wednesday - but there was no question who he was referring to when he noted pointedly that he “wasn't born with a silver spoon in my mouth” and that he and his wife were given “a chance” by others. The line was part of Obama's argument as he campaigned at a community college in Elyria that the Republican budget would gut initiatives like job training programs that are aimed at getting unemployed Americans back to work.
NEWS
April 19, 2012 | By Michael McGough
President Obama got a rise out of Mitt Romney with the campaign-trail observation that "I wasn't born with a silver spoon in my mouth. " Romney saw the remark (plausibly) as an attack on him and (not so plausibly, but ingeniously) as an attack on Romney's rags-to-Rambler father. "I'm certainly not going to apologize for my dad and his success in life ," Romney harrumphed. "He was born poor. He worked his way to become very successful despite the fact that he didn't have a college degree, and one of the things he wanted to do was to provide for me and my brother and sisters.
NEWS
April 18, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli and Kathleen Hennessey
ELYRIA, Ohio -- President Obama invoked his working-class roots and the career success he enjoyed later as he pitched his vision of economic fairness in the key electoral battleground of state of Ohio. Obama, speaking Wednesday at Lorain County Community College in the Cleveland-area town of Elyria, touted his support for investment in job training programs that connect community colleges with unemployed workers, programs he warned the Republicans would "gut" under their budget blueprint.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1997
Clifton's Silver Spoon on West 7th Street has gone the way of Clifton's Century City and Clifton's Pacific Seas--out of business. Owners of the much-beloved chain of Los Angeles cafeterias said they were forced to merge the 22-year-old restaurant with their downtown eatery two blocks away, Clifton's Brookdale Cafeteria, for economic reasons.
NEWS
February 26, 2002 | CHARLES CASILLO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Actress Sally Kirkland remembers the day when, on her way into the Silver Spoon restaurant in West Hollywood, she encountered director Quentin Tarantino loitering out front. Tarantino was looking for actor Robert Forster, a regular diner at the Greek coffee shop, hoping to cast him in his then-upcoming film "Jackie Brown." Tarantino coaxed Kirkland into waiting with him for the actor to arrive and they began to chat.
BOOKS
September 5, 1993 | RICHARD EDER
Perhaps no one born with a silver spoon in his mouth has made such specifically appropriate use of it as the poet James Merrill. As silver, it gives a fine luster to his voice; as a spoon, it comes close to gagging him. His work, which has won just about every American prize there is, draws its essence from two qualities: a shining beauty and a sense of impediment. It is precious in both full senses of the word.
BOOKS
September 20, 1992 | Verlyn Klinkenborg, Klinkenborg is the author of "Making Hay" and "The Last Fine Time" (Vintage). He is a recipient of the 1992 Lia Wallace--Reader's Digest Writers Award
Whether or not the title of Richard Bushman's new book "The Refinement of America" sounds like an oxymoron to you depends on what you make of the United States. Has it been refined? Is it capable of refinement? Is there such a thing as a refinement, a gentility, that is distinctly American? Or is America a perpetually dark coast, its nature, its abundance raw in the extreme; its energies, its engine barbaric? These are old questions.
NEWS
April 19, 2012 | By Maeve Reston
CLEVELAND - President Obama did not mention Mitt Romney by name when he campaigned here in Lorain County on Wednesday - but there was no question who he was referring to when he noted pointedly that he “wasn't born with a silver spoon in my mouth” and that he and his wife were given “a chance” by others. The line was part of Obama's argument as he campaigned at a community college in Elyria that the Republican budget would gut initiatives like job training programs that are aimed at getting unemployed Americans back to work.
NEWS
April 18, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli and Kathleen Hennessey
ELYRIA, Ohio -- President Obama invoked his working-class roots and the career success he enjoyed later as he pitched his vision of economic fairness in the key electoral battleground of state of Ohio. Obama, speaking Wednesday at Lorain County Community College in the Cleveland-area town of Elyria, touted his support for investment in job training programs that connect community colleges with unemployed workers, programs he warned the Republicans would "gut" under their budget blueprint.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2012 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
  When, during his recent State of the Union address, President Obama spoke of "an economy where everyone gets a fair shot, everyone does their fair share, and everyone plays by the same rules," I wasn't worried about the GOP response or changes to our tax codes. I was worried about Downton. Everyone loves "Downton Abbey. "PBS' biggest hit in years, it's won Emmys, a Golden Globe and the critics' hearts. We are all smitten with the elegant writing, the fabulous cast (Maggie Smith!
OPINION
May 13, 2008
Re "Obama faces hurdles bigger than his race," May 11 So political strategists and analysts say Barack Obama's race is less a problem to overcome to win over white voters in November than his inexperience and a liberal, elitist tag? Hogwash! Obama has exactly half as many Ivy League degrees as our current president, who, you might recall, was born with a silver spoon in his mouth and was not raised by a single mother on food stamps. Yet no one ever called George W. Bush an elitist.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2006 | Mimi Avins, Times Staff Writer
YOU can't choose your parents too carefully. This useless bit of advice is usually uttered behind the backs of people who have inherited something widely considered desirable -- wealth, talent, charm, superior intelligence or good looks. The cliche is pregnant with the envy and contempt often reserved for those whose genes and circumstances seem to put them at the head of life's race.
OPINION
November 22, 2005 | Dean Bakopoulos, DEAN BAKOPOULOS' novel, "Please Don't Come Back from the Moon," about the disappearances of unemployed men in a working-class Detroit suburb, will be released in paperback by Harcourt in January.
THE AMERICAN auto industry is dead. With General Motors announcing, days before Thanksgiving, 30,000 more layoffs and nine plant closings, the Rust Belt just got the final strike of the sledgehammer. When GM finally goes down for good, all the rusted remains of that region will crumble. My grandfather was a UAW man who slapped dashboards into Mustangs at the Ford Rouge plant just outside Detroit; my grandmother sweated out the first shift at Cabot tool and die.
NEWS
November 11, 1993 | BEVERLY BEYETTE
When boy meets girl at this bar, he doesn't want to know, "What's your sign?" He's apt to ask, "Who was President on the first day of the 20th Century?" Welcome to the Silver Spoon in West Hollywood, the thinking person's saloon, where regulars humiliate themselves over affable bartender Jim Field's weekly killer quiz. "It makes 'Jeopardy!' look like 'Wheel of Fortune,' " says free-lance writer Rick Sandack, who lives in the neighborhood.
FOOD
August 6, 1992 | MARY W. WALSH
"You can eat anything with a spoon," says my husband. And so he does. He is--in most respects--responsible and housebroken. He grew up with pleasant parents in a pleasant Philadelphia neighborhood, with Royal Copenhagen flatware, Spode china, even servants now and then. He's good at thank-you notes. He knows how to dress for funerals, cathedrals and saloons. He goes at many of life's problems with an easy charm. But there is the refractory matter of the spoon. He prefers it to the fork.
MAGAZINE
April 3, 2005 | Robert Lloyd, Robert Lloyd writes on television for The Times.
It is a fact of show business--sad or happy, on a case-to-case basis--that most child actors do not grow up to be adult actors. They lose their youthful glow or appealing proportions, often exposing a limited talent. Or the public doesn't want to see the moppet grown, finds the idea distasteful, even. Or the actors themselves prefer to go on to what is usually called a normal life. For them awaits a future of random personal appearances, reunion shows and ironic cameo roles.
SPORTS
August 30, 2003
It was the best of Times, it was the worst of Times. Some guy named Dickens wrote that long ago, but he forgot to capitalize the name of the publication. Tuesday's edition juxtaposed a sweet photo of Pete Sampras carrying his baby son on a final victory lap with two articles describing what an incredible jerk Lamar Odom is. Christian Sampras is too young to realize what a fortunate baby he is, having been born with great genes and a silver spoon in his mouth. And Odom is too dense and/or insensitive to realize what a fortunate adult he is, having been born with genes that enable him to make more than $10 million a year playing a kids' game when he's not on the Unable To Perform (Malingering)
Los Angeles Times Articles
|