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BUSINESS
November 26, 1990 | From Associated Press
Neil Bush served on the board of a Silverado savings and loan affiliate that helped a Denver home builder evade securities laws, according to federal documents quoted in a newspaper Sunday. The President's son already is awaiting an administrative law judge's ruling on whether he was guilty of conflicts of interest while serving on the board of the failed Denver savings and loan. The failure of Silverado in December, 1988, is expected to cost taxpayers $1 billion.
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BUSINESS
August 6, 1991 | From Associated Press
The Treasury Department asked the FBI last fall to investigate allegations that regulators delayed until after Election Day, 1988, their closing of a Colorado savings and loan where President Bush's son, Neil, was a director, documents show. An FBI spokesman confirmed on Monday that the agency has been investigating Silverado Banking, Savings & Loan Assn. for more than a year, but he declined to say whether the effort covers charges of pressure to delay Silverado's closing.
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BUSINESS
June 19, 1991 | From Associated Press
After more than a year of legal haggling, President Bush's son, Neil, has decided to end his fight with federal regulators in his savings and loan case. Neil Bush won't appeal the government's April order imposing mild restrictions on him if he again becomes a director of a bank or S&L, his attorney said Tuesday. "He wants to put everything behind him," James Nesland said.
BUSINESS
June 19, 1991 | From Associated Press
After more than a year of legal haggling, President Bush's son, Neil, has decided to end his fight with federal regulators in his savings and loan case. Neil Bush won't appeal the government's April order imposing mild restrictions on him if he again becomes a director of a bank or S&L, his attorney said Tuesday. "He wants to put everything behind him," James Nesland said.
BUSINESS
August 6, 1991 | From Associated Press
The Treasury Department asked the FBI last fall to investigate allegations that regulators delayed until after Election Day, 1988, their closing of a Colorado savings and loan where President Bush's son, Neil, was a director, documents show. An FBI spokesman confirmed on Monday that the agency has been investigating Silverado Banking, Savings & Loan Assn. for more than a year, but he declined to say whether the effort covers charges of pressure to delay Silverado's closing.
NEWS
July 16, 1990 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Atty. Gen. Dick Thornburgh said Sunday that he is unaware of any criminal wrongdoing by Neil Bush, the President's son, in the collapse of a Denver savings and loan. Although federal regulators have charged Bush with civil violations of banking regulations in his role as a director of the thrift, they have not asked the Justice Department to investigate possible criminal misconduct, Thornburgh said in a television interview.
BUSINESS
January 10, 1990 | Associated Press
Regulators today penalized two directors of the failed Silverado, Banking Savings and Loan Assn. in Denver, which once listed President Bush's son Neil as a director. The directors--Richard K. Vandapool and Robert M. Lewis--agreed to an order prohibiting them from working at any federally insured financial institution without prior approval from regulators. The order covers commercial banks, savings institutions and credit unions.
BUSINESS
January 19, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Federal regulators said today they have postponed a decision on whether to take any action against Neil Bush, the President's son, for his role as a director of the failed Silverado Banking, Savings and Loan Assn. in Denver. Meanwhile, the Office of Thrift Supervision said in a statement that W. James Metz, majority stockholder of Silverado, became the fourth officer of the thrift to accept a lifetime ban from working for a federally insured financial institution.
BUSINESS
August 15, 1990 | FROM TIMES WIRE SERVICES
A government witness in the conflict-of-interest case against Neil Bush says the President's son lost his ethical moorings--but did not try to deceive anyone--while he was a director of a Denver savings and loan. In testimony released Tuesday by the federal Office of Thrift Supervision, University of Colorado Prof. Edward J. Conry wrote that the 35-year-old Bush did not lie, try to conceal or mislead.
NEWS
January 26, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Federal thrift officials said today they are seeking a cease-and-desist order against Neil Bush, one day after the President's son rejected a settlement over his role as a director of a collapsed savings and loan. Neil Bush's actions as a director of Silverado Banking, Savings and Loan Assn. of Denver amounted to conflicts of interest, said the Enforcement Review Committee of the Office of Thrift Supervision in Washington, D.C. The case will be heard by an administrative law judge.
BUSINESS
November 26, 1990 | From Associated Press
Neil Bush served on the board of a Silverado savings and loan affiliate that helped a Denver home builder evade securities laws, according to federal documents quoted in a newspaper Sunday. The President's son already is awaiting an administrative law judge's ruling on whether he was guilty of conflicts of interest while serving on the board of the failed Denver savings and loan. The failure of Silverado in December, 1988, is expected to cost taxpayers $1 billion.
NEWS
July 16, 1990 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Atty. Gen. Dick Thornburgh said Sunday that he is unaware of any criminal wrongdoing by Neil Bush, the President's son, in the collapse of a Denver savings and loan. Although federal regulators have charged Bush with civil violations of banking regulations in his role as a director of the thrift, they have not asked the Justice Department to investigate possible criminal misconduct, Thornburgh said in a television interview.
NEWS
May 23, 1990 | From United Press International
Neil Bush, the President's son, today defended his actions as a director of a failed Denver savings and loan and called "frivolous" allegations that he has violated federal thrift regulations. Bush defended his vote to approve $106 million in loans to two business associates, Colorado developers Bill Walters and Ken Good, who eventually defaulted on the loans. A bank controlled by Walters had extended a $1-million line of credit to Bush's oil company, JNB Exploration.
BUSINESS
October 15, 1990 | From Associated Press
A savings and loan became insolvent after lending President Bush's son Jeb and a partner about half the money toward purchase of a $9-million office building, and the federal government ended up repaying most of the loan, the New York Times reported. Although it involved no criminal behavior, the loan is an example of the kind of poor lending practices that led to the thrift industry's troubles, the newspaper said.
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