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ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2008 | Reed Johnson, Times Staff Writer
Metallurgically speaking, it sounds paradoxical to talk about a "Golden Age" of silversmithing. But the phrase comes naturally to Antonio Pineda as he recollects the era when his lustrous creations adorned heiresses' throats, commanded praise from heads of state and draped the creamy skin of Hollywood stars. Back in the day, circa 1940-80, Pineda was a charismatic, compact bundle of energy with a matinee idol's pencil mustache and a studio mogul's vaulting ambition. A master of silver design and sculpting, he oversaw a taller (workshop)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2009 | Dennis McLellan
Antonio Pineda, the internationally renowned Mexican modernist silversmith who was praised for his bold, striking jewelry designs and ingenious use of gemstones, has died. He was 90. Pineda died of kidney failure Monday at his ranch home in Taxco, Mexico, said his daughter Veronica Falzone. A Taxco native, Pineda was among the most prominent of the many silversmiths to emerge from the mountain mining town beginning in the 1930s. He was the subject of a 2008-09 exhibition at UCLA's Fowler Museum, “Silver Seduction: The Art of Mexican Modernist Antonio Pineda,” which traced the evolution of his work through the 1970s.
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HOME & GARDEN
September 30, 2004 | Leslie Trilling
This three-piece sterling suite, circa 1930, was produced by the legendary Pasadena silversmith Clemens Friedell. The pieces will be offered Sunday at A.N. Abell Auction Co., in a special quarterly fine art and antique sale. According to Michael J. Weller, owner of San Francisco's Argentum Antiques and a leading scholar of California silversmiths, Friedell's silver chronicled the entire Southern California lifestyle of the early 20th century.
HOME & GARDEN
June 27, 2009 | Ariel Swartley
Rick White, owner of Vroman's Silver Shop in Glendora, pulls out a photo of a tea service so stately it looks like it would confer a title on any hand that poured from it. White says that its owner spotted a burglar leaving her house with it but that the police were able to recover the set. The bad news: The silver had been tossed from the burglar's car onto a freeway. Damage included dents, broken handle parts and what White matter-of-factly describes as "road rash."
NEWS
July 9, 1993 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hudson Roysher, art professor, designer and silversmith who created maces for universities and chalices and candelabra for major Southern California churches, has died at the age of 81. Roysher, who had retired to La Jolla, died June 23 at Casa Palmera Convalescent Hospital in Del Mar. His commissioned pieces accent sanctuaries in several Southland churches, including All Saints Episcopal Church of Beverly Hills, St. Brigid's Roman Catholic Church of Los Angeles, St.
NEWS
June 18, 1987 | RONALD L. SOBLE, Times Staff Writer
Question: How important are silversmith marks to the collector of American silverware?--R.T. Answer: Since the manufacture of silverware has been going on in this country for more than three centuries, the number of different silversmith marks is too vast to be of interest to most collectors. That isn't to say collectors shouldn't study the marks; they should, in the context of learning about the history of the craftsmen who created this much-sought-after category of collectibles.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1990 | LAURA VAN TUYL, CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR
To be a silversmith may strike the average person as an anachronism in this age of high-tech widget-making. But there is a small band of contemporary silversmiths across the country diligently hammering away in their workshops, using many of the same painstaking techniques that Paul Revere did. The trouble is, the handmade wares get lost in a market flooded with mass-produced sterling--and the buying public doesn't realize what it's missing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2009 | Dennis McLellan
Antonio Pineda, the internationally renowned Mexican modernist silversmith who was praised for his bold, striking jewelry designs and ingenious use of gemstones, has died. He was 90. Pineda died of kidney failure Monday at his ranch home in Taxco, Mexico, said his daughter Veronica Falzone. A Taxco native, Pineda was among the most prominent of the many silversmiths to emerge from the mountain mining town beginning in the 1930s. He was the subject of a 2008-09 exhibition at UCLA's Fowler Museum, “Silver Seduction: The Art of Mexican Modernist Antonio Pineda,” which traced the evolution of his work through the 1970s.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1991 | R. DANIEL FOSTER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Foster is a Los Angeles writer
Allan Adler's publicist wants to make one thing clear. A tea service crafted by Adler in the 1940s never sold for $1 million at a Sotheby's auction in 1989 in New York. The last of a dwindling breed of silversmiths, Adler has been profiled in various publications for 50 years. "It was only $50,000," said Mike Venema, Adler's publicist, adding that the set was solid gold, somewhat of a design detour for Adler, who works primarily in silver.
BUSINESS
June 6, 1986 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
This capital of the nation's smallest state is one of the world's biggest costume jewelry manufacturing centers. Rhode Island produces 80% of the costume jewelry--or fashion jewelry, as the industry calls inexpensive to medium-priced adornments--made in America. Concentrated in Providence and its suburbs are 900 jewelry firms employing 24,400 workers with an annual payroll of $350 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2008 | Reed Johnson, Times Staff Writer
Metallurgically speaking, it sounds paradoxical to talk about a "Golden Age" of silversmithing. But the phrase comes naturally to Antonio Pineda as he recollects the era when his lustrous creations adorned heiresses' throats, commanded praise from heads of state and draped the creamy skin of Hollywood stars. Back in the day, circa 1940-80, Pineda was a charismatic, compact bundle of energy with a matinee idol's pencil mustache and a studio mogul's vaulting ambition. A master of silver design and sculpting, he oversaw a taller (workshop)
HOME & GARDEN
September 30, 2004 | Leslie Trilling
This three-piece sterling suite, circa 1930, was produced by the legendary Pasadena silversmith Clemens Friedell. The pieces will be offered Sunday at A.N. Abell Auction Co., in a special quarterly fine art and antique sale. According to Michael J. Weller, owner of San Francisco's Argentum Antiques and a leading scholar of California silversmiths, Friedell's silver chronicled the entire Southern California lifestyle of the early 20th century.
NEWS
July 9, 1993 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hudson Roysher, art professor, designer and silversmith who created maces for universities and chalices and candelabra for major Southern California churches, has died at the age of 81. Roysher, who had retired to La Jolla, died June 23 at Casa Palmera Convalescent Hospital in Del Mar. His commissioned pieces accent sanctuaries in several Southland churches, including All Saints Episcopal Church of Beverly Hills, St. Brigid's Roman Catholic Church of Los Angeles, St.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1991 | R. DANIEL FOSTER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Foster is a Los Angeles writer
Allan Adler's publicist wants to make one thing clear. A tea service crafted by Adler in the 1940s never sold for $1 million at a Sotheby's auction in 1989 in New York. The last of a dwindling breed of silversmiths, Adler has been profiled in various publications for 50 years. "It was only $50,000," said Mike Venema, Adler's publicist, adding that the set was solid gold, somewhat of a design detour for Adler, who works primarily in silver.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1990 | LAURA VAN TUYL, CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR
To be a silversmith may strike the average person as an anachronism in this age of high-tech widget-making. But there is a small band of contemporary silversmiths across the country diligently hammering away in their workshops, using many of the same painstaking techniques that Paul Revere did. The trouble is, the handmade wares get lost in a market flooded with mass-produced sterling--and the buying public doesn't realize what it's missing.
NEWS
June 18, 1987 | RONALD L. SOBLE, Times Staff Writer
Question: How important are silversmith marks to the collector of American silverware?--R.T. Answer: Since the manufacture of silverware has been going on in this country for more than three centuries, the number of different silversmith marks is too vast to be of interest to most collectors. That isn't to say collectors shouldn't study the marks; they should, in the context of learning about the history of the craftsmen who created this much-sought-after category of collectibles.
HOME & GARDEN
June 27, 2009 | Ariel Swartley
Rick White, owner of Vroman's Silver Shop in Glendora, pulls out a photo of a tea service so stately it looks like it would confer a title on any hand that poured from it. White says that its owner spotted a burglar leaving her house with it but that the police were able to recover the set. The bad news: The silver had been tossed from the burglar's car onto a freeway. Damage included dents, broken handle parts and what White matter-of-factly describes as "road rash."
NEWS
December 23, 1997
John Adair, 84, whose photographs, films and texts documented the Navajo nation for nearly half a century. Born in Memphis, he began his field studies of the Navajo and Zuni cultures in the 1930s. His photographs, films and texts from 1938 through the mid-1970s are definitive references on Navajo health, silversmiths and culture. Between 1964 and 1978, Adair was professor of anthropology at San Francisco State University. On Dec. 14 at his San Francisco home.
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