Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSilverton Co
IN THE NEWS

Silverton Co

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 2001
Doris Silverton, a television writer who wrote several TV movies as well as short stories and newspaper and magazine articles, died Tuesday in Los Angeles after a three-year battle with lung cancer. She was 73. Silverton began her career in television in the 1970s, writing "The Jayne Mansfield Story," which starred Arnold Schwarzenegger, and "Jonathan: The Boy Nobody Wanted." For several years in the 1980s, she wrote for the soap opera "General Hospital."
ARTICLES BY DATE
Advertisement
BUSINESS
December 24, 2008 | Claudia Eller
It's a good thing Nancy Silverton still has her day job. The La Brea Bakery founder and queen of L.A.'s restaurant scene is among the legions of investors who've lost their fortunes in the alleged $50-billion fraud attributed to New York financier Bernard L. Madoff. The financial pain is bad enough, Silverton says, but what makes it worse is that she ignored the advice of her father and others who warned her to diversify her investments.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2000 | S. IRENE VIRBILA, TIMES RESTAURANT CRITIC
Nancy Silverton, co-owner, pastry chef, bread baker and all-around muse at Campanile in Los Angeles, has a good thing going on Thursday nights with her "tartine bar," aka grilled cheese night. That's when she gets behind the bar and serves a dozen or so inventive grilled and open-face sandwiches. (Of course, guests can order off the regular menu as well.) But that's just one night a week.
TRAVEL
December 8, 2002 | Kyle Henley, Special to The Times
There is no easy way down. There's not supposed to be. Just over the edge of my ski tips was Silverton Mountain, North America's first new ski area in almost two decades and arguably one of its most thrilling. With more than 3,000 vertical feet of the steepest in-bounds slopes in the country, neck-deep powder and wide-open bowls, it has what expert skiers and snowboarders dream of. For $99 a day you get nearly unfettered access to this 1,600-acre ski mountain in southwest Colorado.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 2012 | Betty Hallock
Campanile, the seminal Los Angeles restaurant founded in 1989 by Mark Peel and his then-wife Nancy Silverton, is closing. Prolific restaurateur Bill Chait and critically acclaimed chef Walter Manzke sealed a deal late Wednesday night to take over the space with plans to install Manzke's envisioned bistro and bakery, Republique, in its place. The storied restaurant, with its distinctly American approach using top-quality farmers' market ingredients, helped set the tone for Los Angeles dining in the 1990s.
FOOD
June 17, 1998 | S. IRENE VIRBILA, TIMES RESTAURANT CRITIC
Is Alice Waters heading to Paris to open a restaurant? On Thursday, the founder of Berkeley's Chez Panisse flew to Los Angeles for a meeting that would bring her closer to an answer to that question. Over lunch at the Bel-Air Hotel, Waters and Helene David-Weill, director of Paris' Museum of Decorative Arts, discussed the possibility of Waters' opening a restaurant in the museum when it moves to new quarters in a wing of the Louvre in 2000.
WORLD
June 4, 2007 | Louise Roug, Times Staff Writer
MONDAY night, 9 p.m. The darkened streets were eerily empty. At Bread, there were five people at a window table and a couple at the bar. "It looks promising," said Nemr Abboud, co-owner of the restaurant. "Yesterday, we had zero. Today for lunch, zero." Half an hour later, Kamal Mouzawak, a leading proponent of organic farming in Lebanon, and three Italian companions sat down at another window table. "This is resistance," Mouzawak said. "Resistance is trying to have a regular life."
FOOD
February 23, 2000 | SANDRA HERNANDEZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Driving the narrow winding roads that snake through a jungle of mango, banana and palm trees, Silvino Reyes slows the Land Rover and points toward a row of smaller trees nearly invisible under the dense rain forest canopy. "There, beyond the vines and banana trees," he says, giving me my first view of Venezuela's famed cacao trees.
OPINION
September 21, 2011 | By Madeline Janis
Earlier this summer, the L.A. City Council ended the fierce competition for the multimillion-dollar food concessions business at Los Angeles International Airport, awarding contracts to three food service companies that will bring a variety of new local restaurants to the airport. Dozens of companies large and small vied for the contracts, spending thousands of dollars on lobbyists over a three-year period. Celebrity chefs from some of the hottest restaurants in the U.S. competed against one another to impress city officials and win the chance to open concessions at LAX. Here's how this newspaper described it: "The list of proposed restaurants is a microcosm of the local dining scene, from big names such as [Nancy]
FOOD
September 9, 1998 | NANCY SILVERTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
I grew up eating ice cream sundaes at Will Wright's and C.C. Brown's, two of Los Angeles' famous ice cream parlors that no longer exist. At home I'd try to make my own sundaes using bottled sauces and supermarket ice cream. But they were never the same. Even so, I came to develop strong ideas about ice cream sundaes at a fairly young age. I knew pretty quickly to avoid marshmallow sauce; it was always too sweet, and I never liked the consistency of it.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|