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Silvestre Revueltas

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August 31, 2008 | Reed Johnson, Times Staff Writer
Metallurgically speaking, it sounds paradoxical to talk about a "Golden Age" of silversmithing. But the phrase comes naturally to Antonio Pineda as he recollects the era when his lustrous creations adorned heiresses' throats, commanded praise from heads of state and draped the creamy skin of Hollywood stars. Back in the day, circa 1940-80, Pineda was a charismatic, compact bundle of energy with a matinee idol's pencil mustache and a studio mogul's vaulting ambition. A master of silver design and sculpting, he oversaw a taller (workshop)
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August 31, 2008 | Reed Johnson, Times Staff Writer
Metallurgically speaking, it sounds paradoxical to talk about a "Golden Age" of silversmithing. But the phrase comes naturally to Antonio Pineda as he recollects the era when his lustrous creations adorned heiresses' throats, commanded praise from heads of state and draped the creamy skin of Hollywood stars. Back in the day, circa 1940-80, Pineda was a charismatic, compact bundle of energy with a matinee idol's pencil mustache and a studio mogul's vaulting ambition. A master of silver design and sculpting, he oversaw a taller (workshop)
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1999 | JOHN HENKEN, John Henken is a regular contributor to Calendar
"Silvestre." In Spanish, the word means wild, as in untamed or undomesticated. Few incipient artists have been as prophetically named as Silvestre Revueltas, the great free spirit of Mexican classical music. Born on the last day of the 19th century in a rural village, Revueltas revealed precocious musical talent, principally on the violin.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1999 | MARK SWED, Mark Swed is The Times' music critic
Last spring Esa-Pekka Salonen and the Los Angeles Philharmonic rocked the Music Center with a vivid, exhilarating, unforgettably powerful performance of Revueltas' "La Noche de los Mayas." Now we have it on disc, along with several other works by the great Mexican composer who was born on the eve of the 20th century and whose life burned out in 1940, as the century seemed to lose hope.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1999 | MARK SWED, Mark Swed is The Times' music critic
Last spring Esa-Pekka Salonen and the Los Angeles Philharmonic rocked the Music Center with a vivid, exhilarating, unforgettably powerful performance of Revueltas' "La Noche de los Mayas." Now we have it on disc, along with several other works by the great Mexican composer who was born on the eve of the 20th century and whose life burned out in 1940, as the century seemed to lose hope.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1998 | MARK SWED
This is the first recording by the Santa Barbara Symphony, and it is also the first recording of Mexican composer Silvestre Revueltas' last score. A ballet with a revolutionary theme that was left unorchestrated at the time of Revueltas' death in 1940, this work helps fill in the picture of the romantically tragic composer, who was as colorful and vital a force in Mexican music as Frida Kahlo was in Mexican art.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1987 | CHRIS PASLES
Two laudable purposes are fulfilled by the Mexican Arts Chamber Symphony, which for the past two years has been formed at UCLA around Cinco de Mayo festivities. First, the orchestra gives sympathetic attention to perhaps unjustly neglected repertory by Spanish, Mexican and Hispanic composers. Second, it gives UCLA music students an opportunity to play alongside the professionals.
NEWS
February 8, 2007 | Diane Haithman
PACIFIC Symphony's 2007 American Composers Festival, "Los Sonidos de Mexico," will seek to prove that there is more to Mexican music than mariachi by focusing on the roots of Mexican classical music, the Orange County organization announced Wednesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1993 | LAURENCE VITTES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Southwest Chamber Music Society, consisting this time of violinists Peter Marsh and Sheryl Staples, violist Jan Karlin, cellist Roger Lebow and flutist Dorothy Stone, played music by Silvestre Revueltas, Walter Piston and Antonin Dvorak on Thursday night before an enthusiastic audience in Salmon Recital Hall at Chapman University. The concert began with Revueltas' brilliant fourth string quartet, "Musica de Feria" (Music of the Fair).
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1999 | JOHN HENKEN, John Henken is a regular contributor to Calendar
"Silvestre." In Spanish, the word means wild, as in untamed or undomesticated. Few incipient artists have been as prophetically named as Silvestre Revueltas, the great free spirit of Mexican classical music. Born on the last day of the 19th century in a rural village, Revueltas revealed precocious musical talent, principally on the violin.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2000 | JOHN HENKEN
There is not a dud program on the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra's season anywhere, although the ambitious effort heard Friday at Royce Hall really amounted to two concerts in one. The tie that loosely bound was the featured solo instrumentation: piano and violin, well matched and thrillingly played by music director Jeffrey Kahane and concertmaster Margaret Batjer.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1996 | SUSAN BLISS
The Southwest Chamber Music Society kicked off its third season of summer concerts Saturday night at the Huntington Art Gallery with a bracing agenda of some rarely heard and long-loved fare. Yet, with half of the established Southwest String Quartet missing, one could only wonder if group dynamics prevented the performers from meeting the challenges at hand; second violinist Susan Jensen was out with tendinitis, and scheduling conflicts kept cellist Leighton Fong from participating.
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