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ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2012 | By Julie Makinen
David Chase, creator of HBO's "The Sopranos," will launch his first feature film, "Not Fade Away," at the New York Film Festival on Oct. 6, organizers have announced. The coming-of-age movie, set in 1964, centers on a group of friends in New Jersey who are inspired to form their own rock band fronted by a gifted singer-songwriter (played by John Magaro).  The film features Mr. Tony Soprano himself, James Gandolfini, and a soundtrack by Steven Van Zandt, aka "Sopranos" strip club owner Silvio Dante.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2013 | By Greg Braxton, Los Angeles Times
Steven Van Zandt knows his way around the underworld. For six seasons on "The Sopranos," he played Silvio Dante, the consigliere to crime boss Tony Soprano who obediently carried out his orders with a distinctive glower. But these days the actor is having more fun playing a mobster who has been put on ice - literally. Van Zandt - better known as "Little Steven," one of the key members of Bruce Springsteen's E Street Band - has gathered up his cold-weather gear for the second season of "Lilyhammer," Netflix's comedy-drama about surly New York gangster Frank "The Fixer" Tagliano, who escapes under a witness protection program to Lillehammer, Norway, after selling out some of his associates.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
Actor James Gandolfini had long been a big fan of Bruce Springsteen & the E Street Band, and the feeling was mutual, in particular for guitarist Steve Van Zandt, who worked closely with Gandolfini on “The Sopranos” in his role as mob lieutenant Silvio Dante. So it was no surprise when Springsteen, Van Zandt and company played “Born to Run” Thursday night at their concert in Coventry, England, and dedicated it to Gandolfini, who died Wednesday of a heart attack at age 51 while vacationing in Rome.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
Actor James Gandolfini had long been a big fan of Bruce Springsteen & the E Street Band, and the feeling was mutual, in particular for guitarist Steve Van Zandt, who worked closely with Gandolfini on “The Sopranos” in his role as mob lieutenant Silvio Dante. So it was no surprise when Springsteen, Van Zandt and company played “Born to Run” Thursday night at their concert in Coventry, England, and dedicated it to Gandolfini, who died Wednesday of a heart attack at age 51 while vacationing in Rome.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2012 | By Mikael Wood, Los Angeles Times
Steven Van Zandt's gig on "Not Fade Away" began with a disappointment. The first feature from "Sopranos" creator David Chase, the film follows a group of New Jersey high-school kids as they put together a garage band in the wake of the British Invasion. Chase hired Van Zandt, whom he'd cast as Silvio Dante on HBO's mob series, to oversee the film's music - "to design what the band sounds like as they go from 1962 to 1968, and to have that be authentic," as Van Zandt put it recently in an interview at Hollywood's ArcLight Cinema.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2013 | By Greg Braxton, Los Angeles Times
Steven Van Zandt knows his way around the underworld. For six seasons on "The Sopranos," he played Silvio Dante, the consigliere to crime boss Tony Soprano who obediently carried out his orders with a distinctive glower. But these days the actor is having more fun playing a mobster who has been put on ice - literally. Van Zandt - better known as "Little Steven," one of the key members of Bruce Springsteen's E Street Band - has gathered up his cold-weather gear for the second season of "Lilyhammer," Netflix's comedy-drama about surly New York gangster Frank "The Fixer" Tagliano, who escapes under a witness protection program to Lillehammer, Norway, after selling out some of his associates.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
NEW YORK - Ask David Chase why he chose a coming-of-age rock 'n' roll movie with few household stars as his first post-"Sopranos" effort and you'll receive an unexpected answer. "It was sort of inflicting punishment on myself to do the hardest thing you can do," he said. "It's a complicated psychological thing. There's something perverse about it, really. " Five years after he wrapped up his HBO show in controversial fashion, Chase has finally returned to the American screen.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2006 | From a Times staff writer
Are some of the cast members of "The Sopranos" in danger of being rubbed out? The actors who play daughter Meadow, son A.J., Dr. Melfi, Paulie Walnuts, right-hand man Silvio Dante and Tony's brother-in-law, Bobby Bacala, are all reportedly seeking big raises -- and remain unsigned as filming for the final season of the HBO hit is set to begin next month, the New York Post reported Wednesday. If no deal is reached, it's possible that creator David Chase would have to write some characters out.
NEWS
July 19, 2000 | BOOTH MOORE
It was a "Sopranos" family reunion at the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences in North Hollywood on Monday night, minus the murder and mayhem. The cast of the hit HBO show had gathered in the off-season for an Academy members-only discussion, moderated by actor-director Peter Bogdanovich (who appears on the show as the shrink of the shrink played by Lorraine Bracco).
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2007 | Martin Miller, Times Staff Writer
After the penultimate episode of "The Sopranos," the question hanging over Steven Van Zandt's head is what happens to, you know, the wig? Does it stay in the family, does the Smithsonian inherit it, what? "What do you mean?" asks Van Zandt with an edge of the same menace and dark humor that he has brought to Silvio Dante, Tony Soprano's pompadour-styled right-hand man, for the last six seasons. "Half the difficulty I face each day is getting all that hair under my bandanna."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2012 | By Mikael Wood, Los Angeles Times
Steven Van Zandt's gig on "Not Fade Away" began with a disappointment. The first feature from "Sopranos" creator David Chase, the film follows a group of New Jersey high-school kids as they put together a garage band in the wake of the British Invasion. Chase hired Van Zandt, whom he'd cast as Silvio Dante on HBO's mob series, to oversee the film's music - "to design what the band sounds like as they go from 1962 to 1968, and to have that be authentic," as Van Zandt put it recently in an interview at Hollywood's ArcLight Cinema.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
NEW YORK - Ask David Chase why he chose a coming-of-age rock 'n' roll movie with few household stars as his first post-"Sopranos" effort and you'll receive an unexpected answer. "It was sort of inflicting punishment on myself to do the hardest thing you can do," he said. "It's a complicated psychological thing. There's something perverse about it, really. " Five years after he wrapped up his HBO show in controversial fashion, Chase has finally returned to the American screen.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2012 | By Julie Makinen
David Chase, creator of HBO's "The Sopranos," will launch his first feature film, "Not Fade Away," at the New York Film Festival on Oct. 6, organizers have announced. The coming-of-age movie, set in 1964, centers on a group of friends in New Jersey who are inspired to form their own rock band fronted by a gifted singer-songwriter (played by John Magaro).  The film features Mr. Tony Soprano himself, James Gandolfini, and a soundtrack by Steven Van Zandt, aka "Sopranos" strip club owner Silvio Dante.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2007 | August Brown, Times Staff Writer
Vic CHESNUTT has some words of advice for young lovers in his song "You Are Never Alone." "It's OK, you can take a condom. It's OK, you can take a Valtrex," he sings on his forthcoming album "North Star Deserter." "It's OK, you can get an abortion and keep on keeping on." Chesnutt has a long history of morosely hilarious observations about love, sex and death. Yet "Deserter," which features Chesnutt backed by members of avant-garde orchestral collectives Godspeed You!
NEWS
January 10, 1999 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was William Wellman's classic 1931 gangster flick, "The Public Enemy," which inspired David Chase to create "The Sopranos," HBO's darkly comedic series about the New Jersey Mafia that premieres Sunday. "I have always been a fan of mob movies since I was a little kid," says Chase, who also serves as executive producer on the 13-week series.
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