Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSilvio De Mori
IN THE NEWS

Silvio De Mori

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1987 | COLMAN ANDREWS
When the legendary show-biz hot spot (and good French restaurant) called Ma Maison closed its doors two years ago, much of its clientele--especially the lunch bunch--eventually reassembled a block away at the newly opened Silvio's. Two months ago, as reported in this space, the latter's eponymous proprietor, Silvio De Mori, left the restaurant abruptly after a dispute with his partners.
ARTICLES BY DATE
MAGAZINE
June 1, 2003 | Martin Booe, Martin Booe last wrote for the magazine about men who cook.
SCENE: De Mori Restaurant, Beverly Hills. A cheery patio restaurant in the Rodeo Collection. Ivy curls around the trellis overhead and a fountain makes soothing sounds in the background. Owner Silvio de Mori, 55, with white-silver hair and eyes that crinkle up merrily, or wistfully, presides over the end of lunch with yours truly, MB, who is, for most intents and purposes, at this moment, an emotional wreck.
Advertisement
MAGAZINE
June 1, 2003 | Martin Booe, Martin Booe last wrote for the magazine about men who cook.
SCENE: De Mori Restaurant, Beverly Hills. A cheery patio restaurant in the Rodeo Collection. Ivy curls around the trellis overhead and a fountain makes soothing sounds in the background. Owner Silvio de Mori, 55, with white-silver hair and eyes that crinkle up merrily, or wistfully, presides over the end of lunch with yours truly, MB, who is, for most intents and purposes, at this moment, an emotional wreck.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1987 | COLMAN ANDREWS
When the legendary show-biz hot spot (and good French restaurant) called Ma Maison closed its doors two years ago, much of its clientele--especially the lunch bunch--eventually reassembled a block away at the newly opened Silvio's. Two months ago, as reported in this space, the latter's eponymous proprietor, Silvio De Mori, left the restaurant abruptly after a dispute with his partners.
NEWS
May 16, 2002 | ANGELA PETTERA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bosc on His Own: Silvio de Mori has split with his longtime partner, chef Jean-Pierre Bosc. Bosc is in the process of buying out De Mori's interest in Mimosa, the French bistro on Beverly Boulevard in L.A., and Cafe des Artistes on McCadden Place in Hollywood. Bosc now cooks at Mimosa nightly (Oliver de Mori, Silvio's son, remains the maitre d' at Cafe des Artistes).
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 1997 | S. IRENE VIRBILA
When Michel Richard closed his Bar Bistro at Citrus last year, I was heartsick. Where would I go for my fix of charcuterie, steak frites and daube de veau? With the arrival of Mimosa on Beverly Boulevard near Fairfax, I now have a new adresse. French chef and former Fennel alumnus Jean Pierre Bosc has left Lunaria in Century City to open this small, charming bistro with Tuscan-born restaurateur Silvio DeMori. The restaurant is painted the color of fresh-churned butter; banquettes line the walls.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1999 | S. IRENE VIRBILA, TIMES RESTAURANT CRITIC
"No Reservations. . . . No Dress Code. . . . No Tablecloths. . . . No Attitude." Those are the rules at Cafe des Artistes. The new Cafe des Artistes, that is. When Silvio De Mori and Jean-Pierre Bosc, the team behind the wildly successful French bistro Mimosa, took over the hip Hollywood hangout, they knew a good name when they heard one. So Cafe des Artistes it stayed.
MAGAZINE
December 3, 2000 | S. IRENE VIRBILA
WINTER IN LOS ANGELES MAY NOT BE CHILLY enough to pull out that mohair sweater, but it's just nippy enough to induce a longing for French bistro food. You could buy a ticket to Paris or drool over Patricia Wells' "Bistro Cooking." But why do that when you can sip Beaujolais or Bourgueil and enjoy your steak frites or veal daube closer to home? A home-grown bistro has its advantages, not the least of which is avoiding the blue cigarette haze that lends Paris bistros their film noir aura.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1994 | KATHIE JENKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seven years ago Patrick Terrail closed his Hollywood Diner on Fairfax, the Franco-American bistro he opened after the demise of Ma Maison, his original establishment. Terrail, who still owned the Diner's building, then leased the space to Silvio De Mori and turned his energy to re-creating Ma Maison at the new Sofitel Hotel on the corner of Beverly and La Cienega. De Mori ran the former Hollywood Diner as Tutto Bene until filing for Chapter 7 (liquidation) bankruptcy last year.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1995 | KATHIE JENKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kazuto Matsusaka walked out of Zenzero in Santa Monica five months ago. Then he went back. Now he's realized it's true--you can't go home again. Although he's agreed to hang on for a little while longer, he's out of there come September. The Spago alumnus will take over the kitchen at the tchotchke-cluttered Cafe La Boheme in West Hollywood, where he plans to pare down the weird Asian-Continental menu. "The place is very different from Zenzero," Matsusaka says. "I'm going to have to adjust."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 1989 | COLMAN ANDREWS
While sophisticated upscale restaurants (you know: the kind with $28 entrees and $50 Chardonnays) are languishing all over town, more and more informal, inexpensive restaurants are opening--and, for now at least, doing very well. Owners of the 8-month-old Daily Grill in Brentwood, for instance, report that they've been serving between 600 and 800 meals a day--in a 90-seat restaurant--and expect to take in roughly $3 million in receipts this year! They're so pleased with business, in fact, that they are now working on a second Daily Grill--in the new Beverly Connection complex.
NEWS
January 23, 2003 | S. Irene Virbila, Times Staff Writer
Silvio De MORI is a consummate host. As maitre d' and partner at the French bistros Mimosa and Cafe des Artistes, he set the tone with his warm and ebullient personality. Now De Mori has opened his own place in Beverly Hills, De Mori, following the breakup of his partnership with Mimosa chef Jean Pierre Bosc. The Italian restaurateur has taken on the notoriously difficult space in the Rodeo Collection that once housed Reata, a flamboyant cowboy steakhouse that quickly went adios.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|