Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSilvio Santos
IN THE NEWS

Silvio Santos

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 3, 1989 | Reuters
A television magnate, who announced his candidacy for Brazil's president just three days ago, has taken the lead, according to an opinion poll published Thursday. Silvio Santos, known for his appearances on a television game show, was supported by 29% of those polled by Gallup. Fernando Collor de Mello, 40, a centrist who has led the polls since April, slipped to second place among 22 contenders, with 18.6%. The elections are Nov. 15.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 10, 1989 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Television star Silvio Santos, a late entrant and formidable contender in Brazil's presidential race, lost his bid for election Thursday, six days before the scheduled vote. The Superior Electoral Tribunal ruled him ineligible to be a candidate. One reason given for the Thursday night ruling was that the tiny Brazilian Municipalist Party sponsoring Santos is not legally registered.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 2, 1989 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A popular television personality has caused an uproar by entering Brazil's presidential campaign just two weeks before the Nov. 15 election. The newly declared candidate, Silvio Santos, is the founder and owner of Brazil's second-largest television network and the star of a Sunday afternoon variety show that wins the highest TV ratings. He has little formal education and no political experience.
NEWS
November 4, 1989 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Brazilians are fascinated by a spectacle never before seen in Latin America's biggest country: the making of a president in the electronic age. Unlike the last time Brazilians elected a president, in 1960, televised political propaganda and computerized survey results are key elements of the current campaign for the Nov. 15 voting.
NEWS
November 10, 1989 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Television star Silvio Santos, a late entrant and formidable contender in Brazil's presidential race, lost his bid for election Thursday, six days before the scheduled vote. The Superior Electoral Tribunal ruled him ineligible to be a candidate. One reason given for the Thursday night ruling was that the tiny Brazilian Municipalist Party sponsoring Santos is not legally registered.
NEWS
November 4, 1989 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Brazilians are fascinated by a spectacle never before seen in Latin America's biggest country: the making of a president in the electronic age. Unlike the last time Brazilians elected a president, in 1960, televised political propaganda and computerized survey results are key elements of the current campaign for the Nov. 15 voting.
NEWS
August 31, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A man wanted for kidnapping the daughter of Brazilian TV baron Silvio Santos and killing two police officers broke into the 70-year-old magnate's mansion in Sao Paulo and held him hostage for seven hours before surrendering to police. Fernando Dutra Pinto gave himself up after negotiations involving his family, a judge and state Gov. Geraldo Alckmin, police said.
NEWS
November 2, 1989 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A popular television personality has caused an uproar by entering Brazil's presidential campaign just two weeks before the Nov. 15 election. The newly declared candidate, Silvio Santos, is the founder and owner of Brazil's second-largest television network and the star of a Sunday afternoon variety show that wins the highest TV audience ratings. He has little formal education and no political experience.
NEWS
December 18, 1988 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Brazil is stirring with tremors of political uncertainty as the country, Latin America's largest, moves toward its first direct presidential election since 1960. The worst inflation in Brazilian history, catalyzing popular discontent, shows no sign of abating. President Jose Sarney's unpopular transitional government hangs on with little apparent direction or public support. Leftist parties gather strength in a rush for power, and conservatives grasp for a way to brake the momentum.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1989 | PHILLIP W. D. MARTIN, Phillip W.D . Martin has written on Brazilian issues and works in the field of international development.
At rallies and cultural events last November for Zumbi (the holiday commemorating an anti-slavery resistance fighter of the 16th Century), organizers endorsed no candidate for the 1989 presidential election. But they expressed overwhelming personal preference for Leonel Brizola, the ex-governor of Rio de Janiero state; of more than two dozen candidates, all of them white, he had been the only one to condemn racism.
NEWS
November 3, 1989 | Reuters
A television magnate, who announced his candidacy for Brazil's president just three days ago, has taken the lead, according to an opinion poll published Thursday. Silvio Santos, known for his appearances on a television game show, was supported by 29% of those polled by Gallup. Fernando Collor de Mello, 40, a centrist who has led the polls since April, slipped to second place among 22 contenders, with 18.6%. The elections are Nov. 15.
NEWS
November 2, 1989 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A popular television personality has caused an uproar by entering Brazil's presidential campaign just two weeks before the Nov. 15 election. The newly declared candidate, Silvio Santos, is the founder and owner of Brazil's second-largest television network and the star of a Sunday afternoon variety show that wins the highest TV ratings. He has little formal education and no political experience.
BUSINESS
November 28, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
Is scaring the living daylights out of someone hilarious or mean? You decide. Last week, the Brazilian hidden camera show "Programa Silvio Santos" aired clips of people screaming in terror at a ghostly girl in a broken elevator. The video was posted to YouTube, where it already has more than 7 million views and rising. Gawker, and several other news sources, have referred to it as possibly the scariest prank ever. The poor unsuspecting subjects enter an office building and are directed to the elevators by a friendly woman at the front desk.
NEWS
May 25, 1990 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If there were a candidate's handbook on electioneering in Latin America, it would need to include this new rule: Assure the voters that you are particularly well qualified because you lack experience in politics. In a growing number of countries, and especially those with grave economic and social problems, newcomers and outsiders alike are dishing out embarrassing defeats to traditional politicians and old-line parties.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|