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Sima Samar

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NEWS
December 6, 2001 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The news that a woman has been named deputy prime minister of Afghanistan made headlines around the world Wednesday, but perhaps nowhere did it mean as much as in a small clinic here, halfway down an alley swirling with noise, donkeys and dust, miles from the Afghan border. Here, the real significance could be read in the faces of three nurses who stood behind a curtain in the narrow maternity room--broad, shy smiles, with a hint of surprised pride.
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NEWS
December 6, 2001 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The news that a woman has been named deputy prime minister of Afghanistan made headlines around the world Wednesday, but perhaps nowhere did it mean as much as in a small clinic here, halfway down an alley swirling with noise, donkeys and dust, miles from the Afghan border. Here, the real significance could be read in the faces of three nurses who stood behind a curtain in the narrow maternity room--broad, shy smiles, with a hint of surprised pride.
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WORLD
January 30, 2005
Afghanistan's top human rights official urged the country to confront the horrors of its past, saying that war crimes dating back more than 20 years should be prosecuted and rights abusers should be purged from public office. Louise Arbour, the U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights, and Sima Samar, chairwoman of the Afghanistan Independent Human Rights Commission, presented a report to President Hamid Karzai, calling on the government to meet Afghans' "desire for justice."
NEWS
March 16, 2002 | From Times Wire Services
Afghan leader Hamid Karzai said Friday that he hoped to stay in power beyond his initial six-month term, and he implored expatriates to return home and help rebuild Afghanistan. The prime minister said he and his Cabinet were working to restore Afghans' confidence in government and to establish international credibility. But the process will take time, he said, and his appointment by the upcoming tribal assembly, or loya jirga, would provide necessary stability.
NEWS
March 17, 2002 | From Times Wire Services
Afghan leader Hamid Karzai said Friday that he hoped to stay in power beyond his initial six-month term, and he implored expatriates to return home and help rebuild Afghanistan. The prime minister said he and his Cabinet were working to restore Afghans' confidence in government and to establish international credibility. But the process will take time, he said, and his appointment by the upcoming tribal assembly, or loya jirga, would provide necessary stability.
NEWS
December 18, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The head of Afghanistan's newly created Ministry of Women's Affairs challenged Secretary of State Colin L. Powell on Monday to pick women for high-profile jobs at the U.S. Embassy in the war-ravaged country. After the deposed Taliban's harsh reign rendered women largely invisible, the minister, Sima Samar, said the international community has an obligation to put women in high-profile positions to demonstrate that a new day is coming.
NEWS
March 9, 2002 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The movie theater where they gathered had been burned by the Taliban. Its roof was jury-rigged out of red-and-white parachute cloth. The guests had to sit on new folding chairs still partially wrapped in plastic. But that only added to the up-from-the-ashes charm Friday as hundreds of Afghan women and a raft of international dignitaries gathered for the first observance of International Women's Day in Afghanistan since before the Taliban came to power.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2009 | TINA DAUNT
Everybody knows about Jay Leno's taste for topical humor. Far fewer are aware that his wife, Mavis, has long been one of Hollywood's most influential behind-the-scenes activists on behalf of women. For more than a decade Mavis Leno has made the plight of Afghan women her particular case and this month she and the organization in which she plays a pivotal role -- the Feminist Majority Foundation -- will hold what amounts to a coming out party for the next round in this cause.
NEWS
December 5, 2001 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After settling on the form, duties and timetable of a post-Taliban administration, four Afghan factions chose an interim prime minister early today and neared final agreement on a 29-member multiethnic council to guide their country toward peaceful democratic rule. The delegates chose Hamid Karzai, a 46-year-old tribal leader who has been fighting the Taliban, to head the council as prime minister.
NEWS
October 11, 2001 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For many Americans, the end to Afghanistan's agony begins with a simple step: Just show the door to Osama bin Laden. After all, he's a foreigner--a Saudi exile whose very presence has completed the diplomatic isolation of his Afghan hosts and brought more suffering to a people whose plight is already desperate after decades of war. The ruling Taliban's refusal even to consider such an option--even though the stance has drawn four days of U.S.
WORLD
June 12, 2002 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The last serious presidential challenger to interim leader Hamid Karzai withdrew his candidacy Tuesday, enhancing the impression among many delegates to this nation's grand assembly that the selection had been fixed by foreign advisors and those already in power. Former President Burhanuddin Rabbani's announcement that he was bowing out led to speculation among observers and delegates that he had been promised a prestigious post.
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