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Simeon Nkoane

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NEWS
August 1, 1985 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Maki Skosana never had a chance. So great was the anger of Duduza's 40,000 black residents against South Africa's minority white government and its apartheid system that when a rumor developed that Skosana was a police informant, she was condemned--in a community where she had grown up and lived almost all her life.
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NEWS
August 4, 1986 | United Press International
Anglican church officials today named a white churchman to succeed Desmond Tutu as the bishop of Johannesburg. Anglican clergy and officials deliberated all day before unexpectedly choosing Duncan Buchanan instead of the assistant black bishop in Johannesburg, Simeon Nkoane. The selection was announced by Philip Russell, retiring archbishop of Cape Town, who will yield his position as head of the 2 million-strong South African Church on Sept. 7 to Tutu.
NEWS
July 10, 1985 | From Reuters
Nobel Peace Prize winner Bishop Desmond Tutu struggled with rioters today to save the life of a black man accused of working as a police informer. Tutu had just arrived in the black township district, where nine blacks were shot dead by South African police Tuesday. Witnesses said Tutu and Johannesburg's bishop suffragan, Simeon Nkoane, left a funeral service for four black people in Duduza to intervene as a crowd beat the man, aged about 30, apparently injuring him badly.
NEWS
February 15, 1986 | Associated Press
Police fired tear gas and lashed out with rubber whips as they charged into a crowd of 2,000 black women preparing to march against apartheid Friday, witnesses reported. They said the police chased the screaming women through the streets of Atteridgeville, a black community about three miles west of Pretoria, and injured dozens of them. The witnesses, speaking on condition of anonymity, said dozens of women were taken away by authorities and estimated the number of injured at between 25 and 50.
NEWS
September 4, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
Thousands of black youths today burned barricades, stoned buses and marched in protest in Soweto as security forces fired warning shots and tear gas to block a mass funeral for at least 20 blacks killed by police. Unconfirmed accounts quoted Soweto residents as saying as many as five people may have been killed in clashes with security forces. But the government Bureau for Information said it had no reports of injuries or deaths.
NEWS
August 5, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
Anglican Church officials, bypassing more well-known candidates, Monday elected low-key white clergyman Duncan Buchanan to succeed Nobel laureate Desmond Tutu as bishop of Johannesburg. Buchanan, the 51-year-old dean of Johannesburg, said he was surprised to be chosen. He was named at a secret gathering of Johannesburg's clergy Monday night. Asked whether his style will differ from Tutu's, Buchanan said: "It's difficult to say. I'm not Bishop Tutu. I would hope I'd try to be myself."
NEWS
July 11, 1985 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Bishop Desmond Tutu, the Nobel laureate, saved a suspected police informer from almost certain death Wednesday as a crowd of angry black youths punched and kicked the man, doused him with gasoline and were within seconds of setting him on fire. His arms flailing as he pushed through the mob, Tutu rescued the man, a black in his 30s, just as he was about to be thrown onto his burning car, a gasoline-soaked tire around his neck.
NEWS
September 6, 1986 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
As police and soldiers ringed the cemetery, nine more victims of last week's fierce street battles in the black ghetto city of Soweto were buried there Friday in quiet graveside services. The coffins were carried, two or three at a time, into Soweto's Avalon Cemetery, where local clergymen conducted simple services after dropping plans for another attempt at a mass funeral in defiance of police orders.
NEWS
January 13, 1986 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
A black community leader was killed, apparently by black vigilantes, only a few hours before he and other anti-apartheid activists were to meet here Sunday with the U.S. State Department's top official on African affairs. The killing had no apparent connection with the visit by Assistant Secretary Chester A. Crocker.
NEWS
September 5, 1986 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Police fired volley after volley of tear-gas grenades on Thursday to rout thousands of blacks attempting to hold a mass funeral in Soweto for 24 people killed in the sprawling black ghetto outside Johannesburg last week in clashes with police.
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