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Simon Abkarian

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2006 | Irene Lacher, Special to The Times
THE one thing people always say about Simon Abkarian is that there's something in the way he moves. When the noted French Armenian actor starred in Sally Potter's 2005 film in verse, "Yes," movie critic Karen Durbin exulted in his physical presence, calling it "a visual feast." Now Abkarian is bringing some of his loose-limbed elegance to the Actors' Gang new home in Culver City, where he's directing a production of "Love's Labor's Lost," which opens Saturday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2006 | Irene Lacher, Special to The Times
THE one thing people always say about Simon Abkarian is that there's something in the way he moves. When the noted French Armenian actor starred in Sally Potter's 2005 film in verse, "Yes," movie critic Karen Durbin exulted in his physical presence, calling it "a visual feast." Now Abkarian is bringing some of his loose-limbed elegance to the Actors' Gang new home in Culver City, where he's directing a production of "Love's Labor's Lost," which opens Saturday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2006 | Charles McNulty;Lynne Heffley
BARBARA AND LAWRENCE FLEISCHMAN THEATER, GETTY VILLA Venue A visually stunning production of Euripides' "Hippolytos" inaugurated this magnificent outdoor 450-seat theater last season. Set in the hills of Malibu, the theater has an air of enchantment that could rival anything in the mythological world.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2004 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
The time is August 1946, a year after the liberation of France, and a small group of Parisian Jews are living lives that, as the title of this quietly impressive film tells us, are "Almost Peaceful." "Almost Peaceful" succeeds as a delicately moving memory piece about a subject not often put on film: the process of moving on into ordinary life after surviving the Holocaust.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2005 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
Ever idiosyncratic and daring British filmmaker Sally Potter with "Yes" tells a searing -- the only word for it -- love story that lays bare the pain and rage of the conflicts between the Middle East and the West in the wake of 9/11 and the Iraq War, with its demonization of the Arab world on the one side and escalating hatred of America on the other.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2005 | Victoria Looseleaf
Sally POTTER is a filmmaker with legs, great ones actually, literally and metaphorically. Seen slinking on screen with Argentine heartthrob and tango sensation Pablo Veron in "The Tango Lesson," Potter boldly cast herself in the 1997 film, which she wrote and directed and for which she co-composed much of the steamy music. Smashing boundaries is nothing new for the British auteur, who made her name in 1992 with the Oscar-nominated "Orlando."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1992 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Eugene Ionesco, French master of that style of theater frequently labeled absurd , is nevertheless a practical man. When visiting Los Angeles in 1982 to check in on his friend and former student Paul Verdier, Ionesco was amazed to find that Verdier was giving the A-word new meaning. His younger pupil was not only trying to get a small, experimental theater started in the middle of Hollywood, but also trying to fashion it out of a former apartment building and yoga center.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2006 | Charles McNulty, Times Staff Writer
"Love's Labor's Lost" doesn't come around very often. It's one of Shakespeare's trickiest comedies, a feast of language (much of it antique) served up with little plot and lots of rapidly choreographed high jinks. A curse for a director with a pedestrian sensibility, it's a treasure chest of felicities, verbal and musical, for one with a bold imagination. Fortunately, Simon Abkarian is positively bursting with theatrical ingenuity.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2006 | Charles McNulty, Times Staff Writer
FORGOING the pleasures of talking about Christine Ebersole's tour de force in the Broadway musical "Grey Gardens," Dakin Matthews' colorful, Capote-esque portrayal of an Angeleno power broker in Culture Clash's "Water & Power" at the Mark Taper Forum, the Geffen Playhouse's psychologically nuanced production of David Lindsay-Abaire's "Rabbit Hole" and the inventive Dali-inflected staging of the Blank Theatre Company's "Lobster Alice," I still don't have enough time or space to adequately
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2002 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
Just as Steven Spielberg reached a point at which he was prepared to tackle the Holocaust, in which some of his own relatives lost their lives, with "Schindler's List," Canada's boldly idiosyncratic Atom Egoyan became ready to deal in his own way, in his audacious "Ararat," with the less well-remembered genocide of his own ancestral people.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2009 | Gary Goldstein; Michael Ordona; Kevin Thomas; Robert Abele
Although "Died Young, Stayed Pretty," a documentary about the underground rock poster movement, begins with a freewheeling array of diverting poster graphics and provocative artist interviews, it soon becomes apparent that there's no real structure or point of view to it all. In fact, by the movie's frustrating second half, it's almost as if director Eileen Yaghoobian (who also produced, shot and edited) decided to become as anarchic as the art she features here and just cut together her remaining footage willy-nilly, viewer engagement be damned.
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