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Simon Armitage

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NEWS
February 25, 2013 | By Jenny Hendrix
Poet Simon Armitage has announced a plan to walk 260 miles along the English coast this summer. During this sojourn, Armitage will offer readings at pubs, schools and other venues in exchange for food and shelter, carrying no money and relying on his pen to sustain him.  "The whole idea is that of the barter. All I've got to offer is my work, and the reading of it," he told the Guardian. "Will that be enough for people to say I can stay at their home, or that they'll give me some sandwiches?
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NEWS
February 25, 2013 | By Jenny Hendrix
Poet Simon Armitage has announced a plan to walk 260 miles along the English coast this summer. During this sojourn, Armitage will offer readings at pubs, schools and other venues in exchange for food and shelter, carrying no money and relying on his pen to sustain him.  "The whole idea is that of the barter. All I've got to offer is my work, and the reading of it," he told the Guardian. "Will that be enough for people to say I can stay at their home, or that they'll give me some sandwiches?
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2012 | By Nick Owchar, Los Angeles Times
Behind the action of Simon Armitage's marvelous translation of the Middle English epic "The Death of King Arthur" (W.W. Norton: 306 pp., $26.95), there's an unmistakable mood of bitterness. It has nothing to do with Arthur's fate — yes, there's plenty of bitter sorrow after Arthur's last battle against Mordred, but that's not what I'm talking about. There's another, different bitterness here that belongs to the anonymous maker of this poem, which appeared long before Thomas Malory ever celebrated the legendary warrior-king in his prose "Le Morte D'Arthur.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2012 | By Nick Owchar, Los Angeles Times
When letter-writers need to insert a note after they've already used a postscript, what do they do? Add a post-postscript, or, PPS. Those three letters also apply to my reading plans this summer, which center on three simple topics. Pirates. Poems. Sharks. The pirates belong to former British poet laureate Andrew Motion, who continues the story of Robert Louis Stevenson's "Treasure Island" in his forthcoming novel, "Silver: Return to Treasure Island" (Crown: $24, August)
BOOKS
December 24, 2006 | Simon Armitage
And if it snowed and snow covered the drive he took a spade and tossed it to one side. And always tucked his daughter up at night. And slippered her the one time that she lied. And every week he tipped up half his wage. And what he didn't spend each week he saved. And praised his wife for every meal she made. And once, for laughing, punched her in the face. And for his mum he hired private nurse. And every Sunday taxied her to church. And he blubbed when she went from bad to worse.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2012 | By Nick Owchar, Los Angeles Times
When letter-writers need to insert a note after they've already used a postscript, what do they do? Add a post-postscript, or, PPS. Those three letters also apply to my reading plans this summer, which center on three simple topics. Pirates. Poems. Sharks. The pirates belong to former British poet laureate Andrew Motion, who continues the story of Robert Louis Stevenson's "Treasure Island" in his forthcoming novel, "Silver: Return to Treasure Island" (Crown: $24, August)
NEWS
September 28, 1994
The Lannan Foundation has announced the 10 recipients of its 1994 Lannan Literary Awards. The annual awards are given to writers who have made significant contributions to English-language literature as well as to those with potential for outstanding future work. The recipients include four poets--Simon Armitage, Eavan Boland, Jack Gilbert and Richard Kenney; four fiction writers--Edward P.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2010 | By Gary Goldstein, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"Ordinary people are the only people that will save the world," says a London public relations executive in the gentle and artful documentary "Climate of Change." It's a quote that offers a logical and immediate key to our planet's preservation but also nicely encapsulates director Brian Hill's approach here to depicting grassroots ecology. Hill traveled the globe capturing a variety of average citizens leading regional efforts to defend their environments and, in turn, help to mitigate the potential effects of climate change.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Dominican American writer Junot Diaz is on the shortlist for the Sunday Times EFG Private Bank short story award. The British prize is said to be the world's largest for a single short story: The winner will receive more than $45,000. It's Diaz's story " Miss Lora " that made the list. The story is in his 2012 collection "This Is How You Lose Her. " There are five other authors in contention for the prize: Sarah Hall, Toby Litt, Ali Smith, Mark Haddon, and Cynan Jones. Smith is Scottish, Jones was born in Wales and the others are English.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2008 | Richard Rayner
The gorgeous three-volume boxed set of Roberto Bolano's massive "2666" (Farrar, Straus & Giroux) is surely the year's most adventurous bit of paperback publishing. This shocking and violent tour de force, based on the unsolved murders of hundreds of women near the Mexican border, attacks the contemporary world head on. Simon Armitage's superb translation of "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight" (W.W. Norton) takes us back to Arthurian Britain and Camelot.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2012 | By Nick Owchar, Los Angeles Times
Behind the action of Simon Armitage's marvelous translation of the Middle English epic "The Death of King Arthur" (W.W. Norton: 306 pp., $26.95), there's an unmistakable mood of bitterness. It has nothing to do with Arthur's fate — yes, there's plenty of bitter sorrow after Arthur's last battle against Mordred, but that's not what I'm talking about. There's another, different bitterness here that belongs to the anonymous maker of this poem, which appeared long before Thomas Malory ever celebrated the legendary warrior-king in his prose "Le Morte D'Arthur.
BOOKS
December 24, 2006 | Simon Armitage
And if it snowed and snow covered the drive he took a spade and tossed it to one side. And always tucked his daughter up at night. And slippered her the one time that she lied. And every week he tipped up half his wage. And what he didn't spend each week he saved. And praised his wife for every meal she made. And once, for laughing, punched her in the face. And for his mum he hired private nurse. And every Sunday taxied her to church. And he blubbed when she went from bad to worse.
NATIONAL
March 4, 2006 | Josh Getlin, Times Staff Writer
E.L. Doctorow's "The March," a sweeping novel of Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman's march from Atlanta to the sea during the American Civil War, on Friday won the National Book Critics Circle's 2005 fiction prize. The National Book Critics Circle, an organization of book reviewers, also singled out works in biography, memoir, general nonfiction, criticism and poetry. The awards were announced during an evening ceremony at the New School in Manhattan.
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