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Simon Callow

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1989 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
A strike by the Society of Stage Directors and Choreographers against 67 members of the League of Resident Theaters (LORT) was averted Tuesday when the society signed a new four-year contract with the league. Locally, LORT theaters include the Mark Taper Forum and South Coast Repertory in Costa Mesa. So is everybody happy? Yes, but no.
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BOOKS
February 25, 1996
Space does not allow for a full corrective review of Simon Callow's very uneven book, "Orson Welles: The Road to Xanadu" (Book Review, Jan. 7) but let me cite a couple of items that may raise questions about David Freeman's claim that this biography is "unlikely to be unsurpassed," and that it is "vivid and knowing." Callow uses considerable space to document [Welles' father] Richard's manifold deficiencies as son, husband and father, and then complains that his 15-year-old son rejected him: "There was nothing Dick Welles could do to bridge the gap between himself and his son whom he so deeply but unusefully [sic]
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1990 | ROBERT KOEHLER
"The newspapers in England have called me a 'triple thre" Simon Callow said, pausing with amusement at what he thought was journalistic excess. "Can you imagine?" Well, yes. An American newspaper called the Englishman "the multi-active actor." Not exactly a phrase that rolls off the tongue, but fairly accurate when it comes to Simon Callow. For as lovingly as he holds the acting profession, Callow is not content to corral himself within any particular artistic role.
BOOKS
January 7, 1996 | David Freeman, David Freeman is the author of "A Hollywood Education" and other books
Orson Welles' life was so encrusted with fabrication and myth that by the end, in 1985, you wonder if he knew what was true. Welles didn't much care, and given a choice, he preferred imagination. Or as he put it in the mischievous title of one of the best of his uncompleted movies, "It's All True." Simon Callow is an English actor and director. He was prominent in "Four Weddings and a Funeral," and he wrote a fine life of Charles Laughton (Grove Press, 1988).
BOOKS
February 25, 1996
Space does not allow for a full corrective review of Simon Callow's very uneven book, "Orson Welles: The Road to Xanadu" (Book Review, Jan. 7) but let me cite a couple of items that may raise questions about David Freeman's claim that this biography is "unlikely to be unsurpassed," and that it is "vivid and knowing." Callow uses considerable space to document [Welles' father] Richard's manifold deficiencies as son, husband and father, and then complains that his 15-year-old son rejected him: "There was nothing Dick Welles could do to bridge the gap between himself and his son whom he so deeply but unusefully [sic]
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 1987 | JANICE ARKATOV
Amazing the lengths some people will go to to meet their heroes. Consider British actor Simon Callow. He figured the best way to get to Czech playwright Milan Kundera was to translate one of his pieces. He chose "Jacques and His Master" (opening Friday, under his direction, at the Los Angeles Theatre Center). "Suddenly, wonderfully, out of the blue came a letter from Milan Kundera with a copy of the play, inscribed by him.
BOOKS
January 7, 1996 | David Freeman, David Freeman is the author of "A Hollywood Education" and other books
Orson Welles' life was so encrusted with fabrication and myth that by the end, in 1985, you wonder if he knew what was true. Welles didn't much care, and given a choice, he preferred imagination. Or as he put it in the mischievous title of one of the best of his uncompleted movies, "It's All True." Simon Callow is an English actor and director. He was prominent in "Four Weddings and a Funeral," and he wrote a fine life of Charles Laughton (Grove Press, 1988).
NEWS
June 18, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
A slice of the West will become the South--at least for a time--for an upcoming Vanessa Redgrave movie. The little town northwest of Austin is being transformed in a small Southern town in the 1930s for filming of the movie "Ballad of Sad Cafe." Much of the town is owned by singer Willie Nelson. Shooting is set to begin next week on the film, starring Redgrave and directed by Simon Callow, an actor who played Antonio Salieri in the London stage version of "Amadeus."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1988 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
Monicas, Noon and 6 p.m. Writer-director Anna Ambrose's first, and only, feature--she died of cancer, after completing it--is a delightful mixture of pretty theatricality, witty exposes of London's 18th-Century musical politics, and Handel's glorious music.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1990 | ROBERT KOEHLER
"The newspapers in England have called me a 'triple thre" Simon Callow said, pausing with amusement at what he thought was journalistic excess. "Can you imagine?" Well, yes. An American newspaper called the Englishman "the multi-active actor." Not exactly a phrase that rolls off the tongue, but fairly accurate when it comes to Simon Callow. For as lovingly as he holds the acting profession, Callow is not content to corral himself within any particular artistic role.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1989 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
A strike by the Society of Stage Directors and Choreographers against 67 members of the League of Resident Theaters (LORT) was averted Tuesday when the society signed a new four-year contract with the league. Locally, LORT theaters include the Mark Taper Forum and South Coast Repertory in Costa Mesa. So is everybody happy? Yes, but no.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 1987 | JANICE ARKATOV
Amazing the lengths some people will go to to meet their heroes. Consider British actor Simon Callow. He figured the best way to get to Czech playwright Milan Kundera was to translate one of his pieces. He chose "Jacques and His Master" (opening Friday, under his direction, at the Los Angeles Theatre Center). "Suddenly, wonderfully, out of the blue came a letter from Milan Kundera with a copy of the play, inscribed by him.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1987 | SHEILA BENSON, Times Film Critic
As "The Good Father" (at the Westside Pavilion) unfolds, traveling over much the same ground as "Kramer vs. Kramer" but more deeply and more dangerously, we realize the risks the film makers are running. Anthony Hopkins' Bill Hooper, a London publishing executive, bereft and seething after a separation that was his idea, is a hard man to empathize with, even if one knows intimately the pain he feels at losing his 6-year-old son.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 1996
Thought I'd take the wife and kiddies down to the Doolittle to see Patrick Stewart's "extraordinarily lucrative" production of "A Christmas Carol" ("A Dickens of a Time," by Don Shirley. Nov. 24). Unfortunately, I've been having trouble making ends meet and at 50 bucks a seat (all right, $35 for the cheapies, but all the kids wanted to see if he was really "that bald"), I couldn't come up with the odd $311 (including parking and dinner at Subway) required to provide my little clan with a holiday theater treat.
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