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Simon Cooper

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1998 | KRISTIN HOHENADEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Adam Cooper broke his foot and was unable to dance his role of the Swan in Matthew Bourne's "Swan Lake," it was his brother Simon who stepped into his feathered shorts for three weeks of the hit London run. Until then, most people didn't know that the 26-year-old ex-Royal Ballet star had a brother, let alone one who danced. Simon, 27, took a leave from Rambert Dance Company to tackle the celebrated part, but it was in spite of a lifelong loathing of fraternal comparisons.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1998 | KRISTIN HOHENADEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Adam Cooper broke his foot and was unable to dance his role of the Swan in Matthew Bourne's "Swan Lake," it was his brother Simon who stepped into his feathered shorts for three weeks of the hit London run. Until then, most people didn't know that the 26-year-old ex-Royal Ballet star had a brother, let alone one who danced. Simon, 27, took a leave from Rambert Dance Company to tackle the celebrated part, but it was in spite of a lifelong loathing of fraternal comparisons.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1998 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
A century ago, beautiful dancing was everything in ballet. But not long afterward, Antony Tudor and other emerging choreographers created a bold, penetrating style of dance expression, exploring daring themes through a classicism rooted in realistic gesture. And Tudor first introduced his innovations through the London ensemble now called Rambert Dance Company.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1998 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
Choreographer Christopher Bruce has long been the Cotton Mather of ballet and nobody expected him to stop sermonizing when he took over the venerable London-based Rambert Dance Company in 1994. Originally a pioneer classical ensemble, Rambert had become a pillar of rigorous modernism before Bruce gave it its latest identity: high-minded European tanz-theater with a British accent, dramatic in orientation but with plenty of ballet technique on display.
NEWS
January 17, 1985 | CHARLES SIFUENTES, Times Staff Writer
The development and history of the United States is deeply rooted in the Northern European belief in the "work ethic." The Puritans, Masons and Pilgrims who first set foot in New England believed that hard work wouldn't hurt anyone. This belief holds true at La Salle High in Pasadena, where the work ethic is credited for the school's back-to-back CIF-Southern Section 1-A soccer championships and a string of Santa Fe League titles.
WORLD
August 24, 2003 | Sam Howe Verhovek, Times Staff Writer
At the Garden of the Humble Administrator, a Ming Dynasty jewel here in one of China's most popular tourist towns, the tally of daily visitors reached 7,400 last Sunday. That is very close to a normal crowd, said Bao Lan, an official at the garden. The turnout is also a huge jump from a few months ago, when a grand total of 40 tourists showed up.
NEWS
January 25, 2002 | RICHARD SIMON MICHAEL A. HILTZIK and RICHARD T. COOPER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Senior Andersen accounting firm executives told Congress on Thursday that a fired partner destroyed potentially revealing Enron documents in an apparent attempt to keep them away from federal investigators. Partner David B. Duncan "gave every appearance of destroying these materials in anticipation of a government request for documents," Andersen executives C.E. Andrews and Dorsey L. Baskin Jr.
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