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Simon Hopkinson

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NEWS
December 7, 2012 | By S. Irene Virbila, Restaurant Critic
The other day, a friend who had moved to Santa Fe was in town so I asked him over to dinner. It was a weeknight and I didn't have a whole lot of time to fuss in the kitchen, and also, because it just seemed like that kind of day, I made a roast chicken. My standby used to be Marcella Hazan's method, just stick a whole lemon inside and let it lightly perfume the bird. But lately I've been making it Simon Hopkinson's way, from the British chef and food writer's book “Roast Chicken and Other Stories.” It has to be among the best roast chickens I've ever tasted.
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NEWS
December 10, 2012 | By Russ Parsons
Ooooh, the holiday season does bring out the cranky in some people, doesn't it? When our S. Irene Virbila wrote a blog post the other day about her new favorite roast chicken - from British chef Simon Hopkinson's “Roast Chicken and Other Stories” - some of the online commentary got a little hot. The issue is one of timing - Hopkinson (and Virbila) call for roasting the chicken for 40 to 60 minutes with the oven first on high heat at 475 degrees, finishing at 375 degrees. Someone calling himself “wordsmyythe” wrote: “I guarantee if you follow these directions exactly as stated, you'll have raw chicken on the inside.” And that was mild compared to the ironically named “decentdiscourse” who opined, “Where did they find a food writer who believes a whole chicken at 400 degrees will be ready for basting in 15 minutes and ready to eat less than an hour later?
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NEWS
December 10, 2012 | By Russ Parsons
Ooooh, the holiday season does bring out the cranky in some people, doesn't it? When our S. Irene Virbila wrote a blog post the other day about her new favorite roast chicken - from British chef Simon Hopkinson's “Roast Chicken and Other Stories” - some of the online commentary got a little hot. The issue is one of timing - Hopkinson (and Virbila) call for roasting the chicken for 40 to 60 minutes with the oven first on high heat at 475 degrees, finishing at 375 degrees. Someone calling himself “wordsmyythe” wrote: “I guarantee if you follow these directions exactly as stated, you'll have raw chicken on the inside.” And that was mild compared to the ironically named “decentdiscourse” who opined, “Where did they find a food writer who believes a whole chicken at 400 degrees will be ready for basting in 15 minutes and ready to eat less than an hour later?
NEWS
December 7, 2012 | By S. Irene Virbila, Restaurant Critic
The other day, a friend who had moved to Santa Fe was in town so I asked him over to dinner. It was a weeknight and I didn't have a whole lot of time to fuss in the kitchen, and also, because it just seemed like that kind of day, I made a roast chicken. My standby used to be Marcella Hazan's method, just stick a whole lemon inside and let it lightly perfume the bird. But lately I've been making it Simon Hopkinson's way, from the British chef and food writer's book “Roast Chicken and Other Stories.” It has to be among the best roast chickens I've ever tasted.
NEWS
October 11, 2012 | By S. Irene Virbila
For years I faithfully made Marcella Hazan's roast chicken, which basically involved roasting the bird with a lemon in its cavity. But once I tried Simon Hopkinson's recipe from his quite wonderful cookbook “Roast Chicken and Other Stories,” there was no going back. I absolutely crave this chicken and could eat it once a week, no problem. What's the difference? Well, butter. Hopkinson was famously the chef of Sir Terence Conran's restaurant Bibendum in London and since those heady days has gone on to write a regular column for the Telegraph in London.
NEWS
October 12, 2012 | By Russ Parsons
I love Dorie Greenspan dearly. She is one of my favorite cookbook authors and an old friend. But she is not a normal person. If you need proof, watch this video of her packing for one of her frequent trips to France. And then ask yourself: "What kind of person takes all-purpose flour and a bundt cake pan to Paris?" On the other hand, I sure would like one of those bags! ALSO: 5 Questions for Karen Hatfield Simon Hopkinson's perfect roast chicken Fall happy hour deals that last all -- or most -- of the night
FOOD
September 24, 1997
As fewer people grow up learning the basics of cooking--and as the sales of cookbooks rise--an inevitable genre to grow in strength is the encyclopedic cookbook. Lessons in how to bone and stuff a duck as well as pictorial comparisons between salmon and salmon trout are just two of the many basics covered in the new edition of "The Cook Book," now known as "The Essential Cook Book" (Stewart, Tabori & Chang, $39.95 until Jan.
NEWS
October 13, 2012 | By S. Irene Virbila
I just got a note from Sal Marino, chef/owner of Il Grano , informing me that the Westside L.A. restaurant turns 15 this month. It seems like maybe it's been a few years, but no way has it been that long! To celebrate, he's organized a weeklong festa from Oct. 15 through Oct. 20. He'll be offering complimentary oysters and caviar and also has invited wine personages each night. On Monday, Oct. 15, Chrystal Clifton of Brewer-Clifton will be pouring the estate's Central Coast Pinot Noir and Chardonnay.
NEWS
October 11, 2012 | By Jessica Gelt
Mixology king Aidan Demarest's Glendale hideaway, Neat , turns 1 this Sunday. To celebrate the milestone, Demarest is throwing a birthday bash that day featuring a backyard BBQ, lots of Sailor Jerry barrel-aged cocktails and a stellar lineup of guest bartenders including John Lermayer, Erick Castro, Mia Sarazen, Rich Andreoli and Arash Pakzad. "I've got so many bartenders working that night that there won't be room for customers," jokes Demarest, adding that another superstar bartender is on the roster who he can't announce yet. When Demarest opened Neat, his business plan flew in the face of the city's thriving mixology scene.
NEWS
October 15, 2012 | By Betty Hallock
Sascha Lyon is executive chef of both French-Mediterranean restaurant Delphine at the W Hotel in Hollywood and southern Italian-inflected Soleto downtown. Lyon moved to California after working for 17 years in New York at restaurants such as Daniel, Pastis and Balthazar, as well as his own restaurant, Sascha. At Delphine, he focuses on breezy seafood dishes. At Soleto, which opened in the financial district in the former Zucca space, Lyon's Italian menu is rustic and straightforward: meatballs marinara al forno, pizzas with tomatoes and goat cheese or bacon and potato, homey pastas and secondi such as pan-seared scallops, roasted chicken and dry-aged New York steak.
NEWS
October 11, 2012 | By S. Irene Virbila
For years I faithfully made Marcella Hazan's roast chicken, which basically involved roasting the bird with a lemon in its cavity. But once I tried Simon Hopkinson's recipe from his quite wonderful cookbook “Roast Chicken and Other Stories,” there was no going back. I absolutely crave this chicken and could eat it once a week, no problem. What's the difference? Well, butter. Hopkinson was famously the chef of Sir Terence Conran's restaurant Bibendum in London and since those heady days has gone on to write a regular column for the Telegraph in London.
NEWS
October 12, 2012 | By S. Irene Virbila
When I was in Washington, D.C., recently, I got turned around and took the wrong bus. When I got off, I realized I must be very close to Jaleo , the first restaurant of Spanish chef José Andrés (The Bazaar). It had just been redone and I wanted to check it out. All quiet on a Saturday afternoon. We took two seats at the bar and ordered a glass of Albariño and the cocktail a new friend had enthusiastically recommended: Hometown Hero. I loved the cocktail's tart sweetness, the almost smoky taste of the mezcal and the bitter herbs of Cocchi Americano vermouth with a high note of cinnamon.
FOOD
December 3, 1997
Basic Training "The New Making of a Cook," by Madeline Kamman (William Morrow, $40) The new revision of "Joy of Cooking," by Irma S. Rombauer, Marion Rombauer Becker and Ethan Becker (Scribner, $30) "CookWise: The Hows & Whys of Successful Cooking," by Shirley Corriher (William Morrow, $28.50) "The Essential Cookbook," by Caroline and Terence Conran and Simon Hopkinson (Stewart, Tabori & Chang, $39.95 until Jan. 1; $50 after) Restaurant Specials "72 Market St. Dishes It Out!"
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