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Simon Leung

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July 1, 1998 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Surf Vietnam," Simon Leung's symbolic surfboard installation on display at the Huntington Beach Art Center, reflects his ponderings on a strange stew of cultural beliefs innocently revealed in a brief newspaper article six years ago. The Associated Press report, published in the New York Times in 1992, described American participation in an upcoming international surfing tournament on China Beach in Vietnam, 21 years after the last U.S. troops left the country.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 1998 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Surf Vietnam," Simon Leung's symbolic surfboard installation on display at the Huntington Beach Art Center, reflects his ponderings on a strange stew of cultural beliefs innocently revealed in a brief newspaper article six years ago. The Associated Press report, published in the New York Times in 1992, described American participation in an upcoming international surfing tournament on China Beach in Vietnam, 21 years after the last U.S. troops left the country.
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NEWS
November 20, 2003 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
A preview of the selections in Independent Los Angeles, a festival of local film, video and multimedia that runs today through Sunday, reveals a determination on the part of the artists to achieve maximum impact through minimal yet eloquent means, be the form animation, experimental or documentary. Among the programs in the festival, at REDCAT in Walt Disney Concert Hall, are Jules Engel animations, a selection of shorts made by the late founder of the CalArts animation department.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1998 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Two exhibitions of local contemporaries at Barnsdall Art Park are exceptionally smart, oblique and mordant. "Trash" at the Municipal Art Gallery was selected by guest curator Catherine Lord. She presents 10 artists who inherited the mantle of '50s L.A. Assemblage. The presence of veteran junk artist John Outterbridge attests to the genealogy. His "The Treasure of Blight: Carnival of a Missing Mule" is a classic piece of poetic found-object fusion concocted of a rusty bike and bedsprings.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 1995 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Maybe one reason we can't "all just get along," in Rodney King's plaintive words, is that we're too complex as individuals to fit either the negative stereotypes of race, gender or class or the positive, corrective models offered by social reformers. "Ciphers of Identity," an exhibition at the UC Irvine Fine Arts Gallery through Feb. 4, argues for constructing a blurred, split or frankly fake identity as a way of dismantling the rigid categorizations that fuel prejudice.
NEWS
May 23, 2002
CONTINUING Through June 2: "Central European Avant-Gardes." Painting, sculpture, works on paper, photographs and applied art objects by artists from the Czech Republic, Germany, Hungary, Poland, Romania and the former Yugoslavia. Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Through June 2: "Desire and Devotion." Representations of gods, goddesses and human figures in sculpture, painting and ritual objects from the collection of John and Berthe Ford. Santa Barbara Museum of Art.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2000 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Part art exhibition and part travelogue, "Flight Patterns" is a sprawling spectacle that takes visitors on a dizzying trip to more places than most frequent fliers travel in a lifetime. To visit the globe-trotting show at the Museum of Contemporary Art's Geffen Contemporary is to depart on an imaginative journey to some destinations commonly visited by tourists, like Griffith Park, downtown Seattle and Vienna.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2002 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the 1960s, the arts in America flourished like never before. Boundaries between media disintegrated as the orderliness of the Eisenhower era gave way to freewheeling experimentation. Fun suddenly appeared to be a goal worth pursuing. Pop art, rock music and the pill (not to mention loads of other chemicals) made life exciting. A counterculture was born. Twenty years later, university departments got in on the action.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2002 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Arnold Mesches' paintings, vigorous brushwork embodies turmoil. On the one hand it describes the tumult of what's depicted--the whirling uproar of a Coney Island carnival ride, for example, or the tangled patterns of global migration undertaken by Eastern Europeans in the 20th century. On the other hand the chaotic jumble of individual human memory is denoted. Between the two, our sense of history accumulates.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2011
Words & Ideas Compiled by Grace Krilanovich. SUNDAY William M. Adler : The author of "The Man Who Never Died: The Life, Times and Legacy of Joe Hill, American Labor Icon" will discuss and sign his new book. Beyond Baroque Literary Arts Center, 681 Venice Blvd., Venice. 2 p.m. (310) 822-3006. Gillian Bagwell : The author of "The September Queen" will read and sign her new novel. Vroman's Bookstore, 695 E. Colorado Blvd., Pasadena. 4 p.m. Free.
NEWS
October 5, 1998 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1986, a flashy newcomer came to the home of bean fields, orange groves and Mickey Mouse, literally and figuratively changing the profile of the arts in Orange County. Gleaming in steel and glass, with an enormous abstract "Firebird" sculpture winging from its commanding facade, the $73.3-million Orange County Performing Arts Center instantly became the county's cultural beacon. Twelve years later, 7.
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