Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSimon Levay
IN THE NEWS

Simon Levay

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 5, 1994 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was 1991, and scientist Simon LeVay was riding a rocket. His stunning discovery of differences between the brains of gay and straight men had propelled him from the obscurity of the laboratory to the news pages and talk shows--a potent new spokesman for the belief that some people simply are born gay. Colleagues at the prestigious Salk Institute in La Jolla cheered him as a hero. At gay bars, strangers offered to buy him drinks.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BOOKS
July 11, 1999 | KENNETH REICH, Kenneth Reich is a Times columnist and occasional writer on earthquakes
In California geology, time has been both a blessing and a problem. A blessing, because devastating earthquakes or volcanic eruptions do not occur all that often. (In this century, there have been seven quakes qualifying as seriously destructive in the state's urban areas--four in the Los Angeles area--and just one volcano that became active, Lassen Peak, in 1914-21.) But time is also a problem because memories of such events seem to fade quickly as a constructive influence on public policy.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1993 | DON SHIRLEY
Warning: If you plan to see "The Twilight of the Golds," closing next Sunday at the Pasadena Playhouse but then moving on to Poway and Santa Barbara, you may want to skip the next item. The play, one of the most provocative productions ever seen at the Playhouse, takes a narrative twist that many playgoers may not want to know in advance.
NEWS
May 5, 1994 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was 1991, and scientist Simon LeVay was riding a rocket. His stunning discovery of differences between the brains of gay and straight men had propelled him from the obscurity of the laboratory to the news pages and talk shows--a potent new spokesman for the belief that some people simply are born gay. Colleagues at the prestigious Salk Institute in La Jolla cheered him as a hero. At gay bars, strangers offered to buy him drinks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1992 | G. BRUCE SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was last fall when Simon LeVay and Christopher Patrouch realized that their idea of establishing a school dedicated to gay and lesbian studies was striking a chord in the gay community. All they did was go to a movie while wearing T-shirts that said "Harvey Milk University"--and two women approached them and said they wanted to teach there.
NEWS
September 8, 1991 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Salk Institute scientist Simon LeVay walked into a Pacific Beach leather bar last weekend, all the men stared. At first LeVay figured it was because he wasn't wearing leather. But he quickly realized that they recognized him from the recent media blitz sparked by his discovery made public two weeks ago: That the brains of gay men are structurally different from those of heterosexual men. Literally overnight, LeVay, 48, had become a celebrity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1992 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Simon LeVay, who gained instant fame with his discovery indicating that homosexuality might be caused by anatomical differences in the brain, today goes on leave from the Salk Institute to establish an institute for gay students taught by gay teachers in West Hollywood. LeVay promises to once again to stir public interest and has already raised eyebrows in the scientific world because he will sharply curtail his own research in neuroscience to found the school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1992 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was hardly the typical classroom fare--"Queer Space" and "Homo-Sexual Ethics." But then, the fledgling Institute of Gay and Lesbian Education is hardly a typical school. The brainchild of a transportation planner and a neuroscientist, the institute got off to a modest start last week as students from as far away as San Bernardino gathered in borrowed rooms scattered around West Hollywood to explore topics tailored to a gay audience by gay teachers.
BOOKS
August 22, 1993 | Avodah K. Offit, Offit is a psychiatrist and writer. "Virtual Love," her novel dealing with erotic impulses, is scheduled for publication by Simon & Schuster early next year
Homosexuals are. They always have been. I expect always will be. Gay behavior is likely to continue for anywhere from 5,128 to 7.8 million years, a current mathematical projection of the time remaining for Homo sapiens on earth. Yet the controversy over whether some people choose gay lives blazes on. "The Sexual Brain," by one of the world's foremost neuroanatomists, further stokes the fires.
BOOKS
July 11, 1999 | KENNETH REICH, Kenneth Reich is a Times columnist and occasional writer on earthquakes
In California geology, time has been both a blessing and a problem. A blessing, because devastating earthquakes or volcanic eruptions do not occur all that often. (In this century, there have been seven quakes qualifying as seriously destructive in the state's urban areas--four in the Los Angeles area--and just one volcano that became active, Lassen Peak, in 1914-21.) But time is also a problem because memories of such events seem to fade quickly as a constructive influence on public policy.
BOOKS
August 22, 1993 | Avodah K. Offit, Offit is a psychiatrist and writer. "Virtual Love," her novel dealing with erotic impulses, is scheduled for publication by Simon & Schuster early next year
Homosexuals are. They always have been. I expect always will be. Gay behavior is likely to continue for anywhere from 5,128 to 7.8 million years, a current mathematical projection of the time remaining for Homo sapiens on earth. Yet the controversy over whether some people choose gay lives blazes on. "The Sexual Brain," by one of the world's foremost neuroanatomists, further stokes the fires.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1993 | DON SHIRLEY
Warning: If you plan to see "The Twilight of the Golds," closing next Sunday at the Pasadena Playhouse but then moving on to Poway and Santa Barbara, you may want to skip the next item. The play, one of the most provocative productions ever seen at the Playhouse, takes a narrative twist that many playgoers may not want to know in advance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1992 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was hardly the typical classroom fare--"Queer Space" and "Homo-Sexual Ethics." But then, the fledgling Institute of Gay and Lesbian Education is hardly a typical school. The brainchild of a transportation planner and a neuroscientist, the institute got off to a modest start last week as students from as far away as San Bernardino gathered in borrowed rooms scattered around West Hollywood to explore topics tailored to a gay audience by gay teachers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1992 | G. BRUCE SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was last fall when Simon LeVay and Christopher Patrouch realized that their idea of establishing a school dedicated to gay and lesbian studies was striking a chord in the gay community. All they did was go to a movie while wearing T-shirts that said "Harvey Milk University"--and two women approached them and said they wanted to teach there.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1992 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Simon LeVay, who gained instant fame with his discovery indicating that homosexuality might be caused by anatomical differences in the brain, today goes on leave from the Salk Institute to establish an institute for gay students taught by gay teachers in West Hollywood. LeVay promises to once again to stir public interest and has already raised eyebrows in the scientific world because he will sharply curtail his own research in neuroscience to found the school.
NEWS
September 8, 1991 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Salk Institute scientist Simon LeVay walked into a Pacific Beach leather bar last weekend, all the men stared. At first LeVay figured it was because he wasn't wearing leather. But he quickly realized that they recognized him from the recent media blitz sparked by his discovery made public two weeks ago: That the brains of gay men are structurally different from those of heterosexual men. Literally overnight, LeVay, 48, had become a celebrity.
BOOKS
May 18, 2008 | Sara Lippincott
SIMON LEVAY's "When Science Goes Wrong" (Plume: 298 pp., $15 paper), despite its provocative title, will not give particular comfort to proponents of intelligent design. It's no anti-secular screed. LeVay is a scientist himself -- a neurobiologist who has taught at Harvard Medical School and the Salk Institute for Biological Studies -- as well as a longtime science journalist and author, best known for his 1993 book, "The Sexual Brain."
SCIENCE
June 27, 2006 | Karen Kaplan, Times Staff Writer
Having one or more older brothers boosts the likelihood of a boy growing up to be gay -- an effect due not to social factors, but biological events that occur in their mother's womb, according to a study published today. In an analysis of 905 men and their siblings, Canadian psychologist Anthony Bogaert found no evidence that social interactions among family members played a role in determining whether a man was gay or straight.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|