Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSimon Li
IN THE NEWS

Simon Li

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 20, 1994
Simon Li, a 10-year veteran of the Los Angeles Times who directed the paper's coverage of the Persian Gulf War, has been named foreign editor, Shelby Coffey III, editor of The Times, announced Monday. The 47-year-old Li will replace Alvin Shuster, who had headed The Times' foreign coverage since 1983. Shuster, a veteran journalist who spent 30 years with the New York Times before moving to the Los Angeles Times in 1977, will retire Dec. 31.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 20, 1994
Simon Li, a 10-year veteran of the Los Angeles Times who directed the paper's coverage of the Persian Gulf War, has been named foreign editor, Shelby Coffey III, editor of The Times, announced Monday. The 47-year-old Li will replace Alvin Shuster, who had headed The Times' foreign coverage since 1983. Shuster, a veteran journalist who spent 30 years with the New York Times before moving to the Los Angeles Times in 1977, will retire Dec. 31.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
August 5, 1993 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Orange County civil engineering firm is about to hit a new high-water mark--literally. Simons, Li & Associates is sending seven employees to St. Louis on Sunday to begin the study of flooding along the Mississippi River and its tributaries. The team's findings could eventually lead to new levee designs and flood-control improvements to help alleviate future flooding, company President Ruh-Ming Li said Wednesday.
BUSINESS
August 5, 1993 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Orange County civil engineering firm is about to hit a new high-water mark--literally. Simons, Li & Associates is sending seven employees to St. Louis on Sunday to begin the study of flooding along the Mississippi River and its tributaries. The team's findings could eventually lead to new levee designs and flood-control improvements to help alleviate future flooding, company President Ruh-Ming Li said Wednesday.
NEWS
October 29, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Nominations closed without a last-minute strong contender emerging for Hong Kong's first post-colonial leader after it returns to China next year, leaving four front-runners among a field of 30. The names of the would-be leaders now go to a China-picked Preparatory Committee, which is in the process of selecting a 400-member Selection Committee that will be charged with choosing the future chief executive by December.
NEWS
December 13, 1990 | DAVID SHAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Almost 60% of Latino journalists surveyed in California this year said they plan to leave their jobs within 10 years. About 36% of Asian-American journalists said they are likely to leave journalism altogether within five years. Unlike whites who leave--in much smaller numbers, generally citing boredom and poor pay--minorities mostly cite their lack of advancement opportunities.
BUSINESS
May 12, 2007 | David Pierson, Times Staff Writer
In this entrepreneurial city, connections are king and backroom deals are common. So that may help explain the muted reaction this week when a couple linked to a prominent banker was accused of insider trading in Dow Jones & Co. stock. "In America, you have the SEC taking a very close look at insider trading," said Raymond So, associate dean of undergraduate studies at the Chinese University of Hong Kong's school of business administration.
OPINION
July 23, 2000 | NARDA ZACCHINO, Times Associate Editor Narda Zacchino is the readers' representative
Many readers excoriated The Times for running on its May 17 front page a chilling photograph of a Colombian woman wearing a "necklace" bomb that later decapitated her. A similar photo ran a day later with an editorial that lambasted those who were thought to be responsible for the heinous act--the country's Revolutionary Armed Forces, or FARC, rebels.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1996 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
It's the kind of small exhibition that's winsome because everything about it is better than its dimensions suggest. Titled "Paintings of Zhi Garden by Zhang Hong: Revisiting a Seventeenth-Century Chinese Garden," the show consists of 20 album-size sheets, known collectively as "Zhi Yuan Tu," tucked away in an alcove in the lower level of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art's Ahmanson Gallery.
NEWS
October 15, 2001 | DAVID SHAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the American war effort heats up, more journalists are pouring into central Asia every day. Still more are volunteering to go--in many cases, virtually begging to go--presenting editors across the country with increasingly difficult personnel decisions. Mindful of the lure, the glory of The Big Story--and of the number of reporters who have been killed covering past wars--editors say they don't want "cowboys" or big risk-takers.
NEWS
September 25, 2001 | DAVID SHAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Major news organizations are gearing up to cover a war in which--like U.S. troops preparing for combat--they still don't know where they'll be going, how many of their colleagues will follow and what kinds of battles they'll see, if any. "Whatever happens, this is going to be an extremely difficult conflict to report in a way that lives up to our expectations and our readers' expectations," said Phil Bennett, assistant managing editor for foreign news at the Washington Post.
NEWS
November 18, 2001 | DAVID SHAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seven weeks into the war in Afghanistan, many Americans say the nation's news media are behaving irresponsibly--some even say "treasonously"--by providing coverage that helps the enemy and unnecessarily alarms people here. There is no evidence that any stories have jeopardized U.S. missions or troops, and there have been no new terrorist attacks here, despite widespread coverage of vulnerable targets.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|