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Simon Ratcliffe

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1999 | MARC WEINGARTEN
Electronic music's commercial window of opportunity may have come and gone, but artists like Basement Jaxx will always find a niche. At a time when dance music is moving into more specialized subsets, these British house music masters throw out a wide net with their novel ways of upping the party quotient. At Vynyl on Friday, Simon Ratcliffe and Felix Buxton explored a vast expanse of musical terrain while maintaining a relentless, frenetic groove. That's not easy.
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NEWS
November 13, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
The government released five prominent activists after months in jail, but critics said the five remain muzzled by restrictions on their freedom to travel, attend public gatherings and publish. A suit also accused the police of systematic torture of detainees. The action freeing the activists marks the first time the government has used the July 21 state of emergency law to authorize such restrictions on people not facing criminal charges, a spokesman for the Ministry of Law and Order said.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2000 | By PHIL SUTCLIFFE,
Since the Beatles, the special relationship between Britain and America has rarely looked so dysfunctional. The opening of the 2,000th Year of Our Lord and 46th Year of Our King--dating from Presley's debut single, of course--will find Americans enjoying thudding rap-rock, street-minded hip-hop and down-home country, while Britons bop themselves silly with tiny-tot pop, trance-dance and a little light Brit-rock.
NEWS
April 23, 2000 | STEVE APPLEFORD, Steve Appleford is a regular contributor to Calendar
Dance music is just not enough. Or at least not always--even for Simon Ratcliffe. He's half of Basement Jaxx, the acclaimed London duo that has built its reputation by mixing classic house beats with a variety of pop music genres. The pair has even revealed a weakness for, of all things, guitars and human vocals amid the electronic beats. That can be a controversial notion to some of the dance world's true believers. In those circles, anything but hard, urgent beats can often be heard as heresy.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1999 | ROBERT HILBURN
Together, Britney Spears, Kid Rock, Christina Aguilera, 98 Degrees, Jennifer Lopez and Lou Bega have sold more than $205 million worth of albums. What a waste. Not that the formal pop world seems to notice--publicly at least. Record executives speak proudly of their new moneymakers as legitimate stars who will be around for years, and MTV welcomes Lopez, Kid Rock and the rest with the same enthusiasm the channel shows for such legitimate talents as Rage Against the Machine and Beck.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2000 | STEVE APPLEFORD, Steve Appleford is a regular contributor to Calendar
Dance music is just not enough. Or at least not always--even for Simon Ratcliffe. He's half of Basement Jaxx, the acclaimed London duo that has built its reputation by mixing classic house beats with a variety of pop music genres. The pair has even revealed a weakness for, of all things, guitars and human vocals amid the electronic beats. That can be a controversial notion to some of the dance world's true believers. In those circles, anything but hard, urgent beats can often be heard as heresy.
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