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Simon Rodia S Towers

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2006
WISE words from Christopher Knight ["Restoring Laurels Lost," Feb. 5] challenging the Getty Foundation to strengthen Los Angeles' cultural resources. Could this be done in a new style, reflecting felt needs of the L.A. community rather than additional fulfillment of historic tastes, as in the splendid Villa? If so, the Getty should consider purchasing the Watts Towers, which were sold by the city of L.A. to the state of California in exchange for a 50-year lease ending in 2028. The Getty Foundation should own and control the towers complex, leaving the present Watts Towers Art Center staff intact as a core of new staff to work for the Getty.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2012 | Dennis McLellan
Norman J. "Bud" Goldstone, a former aerospace engineer who devised and directed the 1959 stress test that saved the Watts Towers from the wrecking ball by proving that the world-famous landmark was structurally sound and safe, has died. He was 86. Goldstone, who later served as the conservation engineer for the towers, died Wednesday in an assisted-living facility in Los Angeles after a long illness, said his wife, Arloa Paquin Goldstone. As an aerospace engineer who worked on the Apollo and space shuttle programs, Goldstone was involved in tests of the Apollo command module and one of its booster assemblies.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1985 | RONALD L. SOBLE, Times Staff Writer
After seven years of convoluted legal maneuvering, a settlement may be near in creating a nonprofit corporation to preserve Los Angeles' Watts Towers, but it apparently faces an uphill battle in the City Council. "We're fairly near a settlement," according to Carlyle Hall, an attorney with the Center for Law in the Public Interest. "There's been an agreement in principle."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2012 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Nicholas King was an actor and an assistant to renowned Hollywood photographer Bob Willoughby in the late 1950s when a close friend of Willoughby stopped by his home with intriguing news. The friend, film editor William Cartwright, had visited the famed Watts Towers for the first time and was surprised by what he saw. The unique work of folk art, created over 33 years by Italian immigrant Simon Rodia, had been abandoned since he moved away in 1954. His former house had burned down, the gates to the walled property were open and unguarded, and the grounds were littered with refuse left by unwanted visitors.
NEWS
May 26, 2005
Re your good public art coverage ["Art, No Gallery Needed," May 5]: There is great public art, internationally famed, just four blocks south of the Watts Station stop on the Blue Line -- Simon Rodia's enormous mosaic sculptures. The nearby Watts Towers Community Art Center provides multicultural, curator-trained tour guides from the community who interpret the artist and his work for the public. The tour schedule is available by calling (213) 847-4646. Jeanne Smith Morgan Santa Barbara Jeanne Smith Morgan is chairwoman of the Committee for Simon Rodia's Towers in Watts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2012 | Dennis McLellan
Norman J. "Bud" Goldstone, a former aerospace engineer who devised and directed the 1959 stress test that saved the Watts Towers from the wrecking ball by proving that the world-famous landmark was structurally sound and safe, has died. He was 86. Goldstone, who later served as the conservation engineer for the towers, died Wednesday in an assisted-living facility in Los Angeles after a long illness, said his wife, Arloa Paquin Goldstone. As an aerospace engineer who worked on the Apollo and space shuttle programs, Goldstone was involved in tests of the Apollo command module and one of its booster assemblies.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2009 | Mike Boehm
The Watts Towers may be a unique and symbolically rich work of folk art, but it is also a world-class money trap, vulnerable to earthquakes and the elements, and constantly in need of repair. There's been long-simmering discontent among some of the most intense admirers of Simon Rodia's 100-foot-tall structure who say the city doesn't spend nearly enough on its upkeep and criticize the quality of conservation work carried out by L.A.'s Department of Cultural Affairs. That criticism led to a two-hour state-of-the-towers meeting Thursday at City Hall, as two city commissions considered what has been done and what might be done to preserve them.
NEWS
October 23, 2003
Your intelligently researched Watts Towers article by Diane Haithman ("Officials Take a Close Look at Watts Towers," Oct. 16) told the public that the California Department of Parks and Recreation (towers owner) has brought the city of L.A. (towers lessee for 50 years) to task with specified requirements that can, if performed correctly, reverse the city's decade of refusal to fund the towers' maintenance and repairs. We send our gratitude to the state officials who listened to our three-year guardianship advocacy for improved towers welfare: Dr. Knox Mellon, chief of the State Office of Historic Preservation; Steade Craigo, state preservation architect; and new chief of California State Parks Southern Division in Los Angeles, Ted Jackson.
NEWS
June 26, 2003
While the rest of the world considers the Watts Towers a major masterpiece and the icon of its genre, this national landmark is treated at best casually -- doing a disservice to the community of Watts as well as to the world of art and tourists who might visit if they had any encouragement. According to your story ("Issue Is Up in the Air," June 12), site curator Virginia Kazor has been looking for a cherry picker since March 2002, and she is still trying to arrange a loan from another city department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2012 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Nicholas King was an actor and an assistant to renowned Hollywood photographer Bob Willoughby in the late 1950s when a close friend of Willoughby stopped by his home with intriguing news. The friend, film editor William Cartwright, had visited the famed Watts Towers for the first time and was surprised by what he saw. The unique work of folk art, created over 33 years by Italian immigrant Simon Rodia, had been abandoned since he moved away in 1954. His former house had burned down, the gates to the walled property were open and unguarded, and the grounds were littered with refuse left by unwanted visitors.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2009 | Mike Boehm
The Watts Towers may be a unique and symbolically rich work of folk art, but it is also a world-class money trap, vulnerable to earthquakes and the elements, and constantly in need of repair. There's been long-simmering discontent among some of the most intense admirers of Simon Rodia's 100-foot-tall structure who say the city doesn't spend nearly enough on its upkeep and criticize the quality of conservation work carried out by L.A.'s Department of Cultural Affairs. That criticism led to a two-hour state-of-the-towers meeting Thursday at City Hall, as two city commissions considered what has been done and what might be done to preserve them.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2006
WISE words from Christopher Knight ["Restoring Laurels Lost," Feb. 5] challenging the Getty Foundation to strengthen Los Angeles' cultural resources. Could this be done in a new style, reflecting felt needs of the L.A. community rather than additional fulfillment of historic tastes, as in the splendid Villa? If so, the Getty should consider purchasing the Watts Towers, which were sold by the city of L.A. to the state of California in exchange for a 50-year lease ending in 2028. The Getty Foundation should own and control the towers complex, leaving the present Watts Towers Art Center staff intact as a core of new staff to work for the Getty.
NEWS
May 26, 2005
Re your good public art coverage ["Art, No Gallery Needed," May 5]: There is great public art, internationally famed, just four blocks south of the Watts Station stop on the Blue Line -- Simon Rodia's enormous mosaic sculptures. The nearby Watts Towers Community Art Center provides multicultural, curator-trained tour guides from the community who interpret the artist and his work for the public. The tour schedule is available by calling (213) 847-4646. Jeanne Smith Morgan Santa Barbara Jeanne Smith Morgan is chairwoman of the Committee for Simon Rodia's Towers in Watts.
NEWS
October 23, 2003
Your intelligently researched Watts Towers article by Diane Haithman ("Officials Take a Close Look at Watts Towers," Oct. 16) told the public that the California Department of Parks and Recreation (towers owner) has brought the city of L.A. (towers lessee for 50 years) to task with specified requirements that can, if performed correctly, reverse the city's decade of refusal to fund the towers' maintenance and repairs. We send our gratitude to the state officials who listened to our three-year guardianship advocacy for improved towers welfare: Dr. Knox Mellon, chief of the State Office of Historic Preservation; Steade Craigo, state preservation architect; and new chief of California State Parks Southern Division in Los Angeles, Ted Jackson.
NEWS
June 26, 2003
While the rest of the world considers the Watts Towers a major masterpiece and the icon of its genre, this national landmark is treated at best casually -- doing a disservice to the community of Watts as well as to the world of art and tourists who might visit if they had any encouragement. According to your story ("Issue Is Up in the Air," June 12), site curator Virginia Kazor has been looking for a cherry picker since March 2002, and she is still trying to arrange a loan from another city department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1985 | RONALD L. SOBLE, Times Staff Writer
After seven years of convoluted legal maneuvering, a settlement may be near in creating a nonprofit corporation to preserve Los Angeles' Watts Towers, but it apparently faces an uphill battle in the City Council. "We're fairly near a settlement," according to Carlyle Hall, an attorney with the Center for Law in the Public Interest. "There's been an agreement in principle."
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