Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSimon Schama
IN THE NEWS

Simon Schama

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2014 | By Michael Hiltzik
Whatever you might say about Simon Schama, one of our most prominent and accomplished narrative historians, you can't say he's afraid to tackle broad and challenging subjects. "The Story of the Jews" is the first of a two-volume work aimed at covering 3 millenniums, from 1000 BCE to the present day, with the break coming at 1492 and the expulsion of the Jews from Spain by Ferdinand and Isabella. That's a lot of ground to cover, greater geographically if not in chronological terms than Schama's last multi-volume work, a three-tome "History of Britain" published in 2000-02 that reached all the way back to 3500 BC. Like that work, the scale of "The Story of the Jews" was dictated by the requirement of a television documentary series, scheduled to begin airing on PBS toward the end of this month.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2014 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Time Television Critic
Simon Schama, the British historian and television personality and name-in-the-title host of "Simon Schama's History of Britain," "Simon Schama's Power of Art," "Simon Schama's Shakespeare" and "Simon Schama's Obama's America," is back with "Simon Schama's The Story of the Jews. " Premiering Tuesday on PBS, it attempts to distill 3,000 years of Jewish history into five hours of TV and does a fine, if necessarily incomplete, job of it. Like many British documentaries - the series originally aired in September on the BBC - "The Story of the Jews" comes with a personal touch.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2014 | By Scott Timberg
When telling a tale that includes centuries of endurance, moments of triumph, bursts of humor and sudden, unspeakable atrocities, what's the right tone with which to articulate it all? That's the trick historian Simon Schama had to figure out in his new documentary, "The Story of the Jews," which begins in the Middle Eastern desert about 3,000 years ago and tracks up to the more-or-less present. The program, in five hourlong parts, broadcasts on PBS on Tuesday and April 1. "I wanted to say, without putting on a ridiculous smiley face or making light of the tragic aspects, that there is a story to be told beyond one clearly framed by the assumption of catastrophe," the British historian said in Pasadena.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2014 | By Scott Timberg
When telling a tale that includes centuries of endurance, moments of triumph, bursts of humor and sudden, unspeakable atrocities, what's the right tone with which to articulate it all? That's the trick historian Simon Schama had to figure out in his new documentary, "The Story of the Jews," which begins in the Middle Eastern desert about 3,000 years ago and tracks up to the more-or-less present. The program, in five hourlong parts, broadcasts on PBS on Tuesday and April 1. "I wanted to say, without putting on a ridiculous smiley face or making light of the tragic aspects, that there is a story to be told beyond one clearly framed by the assumption of catastrophe," the British historian said in Pasadena.
MAGAZINE
February 9, 1992 | IVANA EDWARDS, Ivana Edwards is a New York-based free-lance writer.
WE WEREN'T THERE. WE CAN'T GO BACK. NOT EVEN IN our dreams, not even for a fast peek. Slogging through the archives, tete-a-tete with perfumed ghosts, we can only pick over what remains, puzzle over gleanings, search and wonder, sleuth and imagine: what it must have been like, all that we missed, all that we'll never know. Historians do this for a living.
BOOKS
April 16, 1995 | RICHARD EDER
Landscape is more than a nourishment that the earth provides to our imaginations. It is a nourishment that our imaginations provide to the earth. Against the extreme ecological notion of a primal state of wilderness sullied by human civilization, the historian Simon Schama writes: "The wilderness, after all, does not locate itself, does not name itself.
BOOKS
May 21, 1989 | Robert M. Maniquis, Maniquis is the director of " 1789-1989: The French Revolution: A UCLA Bicentennial Program. "
For the bicentennial of the French Revolution, Simon Schama sings no birthday songs, only litanies on the "normalization of evil." Following some recent French historians, and ideas that go back to Alexis de Tocqueville's "The Ancien Regime and the Revolution" (1856), he argues that much of what was progressive in the Revolution was already developing in the 18th Century. The revolution was not, (as many other historians point out) bourgeois, a mere fantasy of Marxists. Rather, it interrupted the bourgeoisifying of France, impeded modernization, and established human rights only to suppress them.
BOOKS
November 14, 1999 | SVETLANA ALPERS, Svetlana Alpers is the author of "The Art of Describing: Dutch Art in the Seventeenth Century" and "Rembrandt's Enterprise: The Studio and the Market." She is a visiting research professor in the department of fine arts at New York University
Why is it that Rembrandt's works continue to have a hold on our feelings and our imagination? It is largely a matter of a profound human engagement. His works make what is distant and strange--Amsterdam burghers and their wives, biblical figures, and Rembrandt himself--seem present and familiar, depicted in a most singular manner. So it is, that when one catches sight of a Rembrandt in a museum, one wants to confront it and, also, to be confronted by it.
MAGAZINE
March 15, 1992
I read with great interest the article on Simon Schama ("History's Rewrite Man," by Ivana Edwards, Feb. 9), having just read about half of his "Citizens: A History of the French Revolution." Schama may have a "compelling phrase style," but that says more about the mundane nature of most history books than about any imagined style that Schama may have. His "Citizens" is blatantly biased, painting royalist and monarchist figures in France and England in a glowing, benevolent light, and revolutionaries in France and America in a snide, condescending manner.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2014 | By Michael Hiltzik
Whatever you might say about Simon Schama, one of our most prominent and accomplished narrative historians, you can't say he's afraid to tackle broad and challenging subjects. "The Story of the Jews" is the first of a two-volume work aimed at covering 3 millenniums, from 1000 BCE to the present day, with the break coming at 1492 and the expulsion of the Jews from Spain by Ferdinand and Isabella. That's a lot of ground to cover, greater geographically if not in chronological terms than Schama's last multi-volume work, a three-tome "History of Britain" published in 2000-02 that reached all the way back to 3500 BC. Like that work, the scale of "The Story of the Jews" was dictated by the requirement of a television documentary series, scheduled to begin airing on PBS toward the end of this month.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2012 | By Nicholas Delbanco
Titian His Life Sheila Hale Harper Collins: 832 pp., $39.99 This is a long book about a long life, a large volume about a large talent. Titian, its titular subject, was the most celebrated painter of his time. He died in his beloved Venice, Italy, on Aug. 27, 1576. The death certificate listed the cause of his demise as fever and age as 103. Like so much else about the artist, however, the date of his birth remains uncertain; it's more likely he died in his late 80s. Even his name is subject to variation.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2009 | Alicia Lozano
British historian Simon Schama never expected Barack Obama to so thoroughly wipe out the Democratic competition during primary season. But as he watched history unfold while filming his latest documentary "The American Future: A History," Schama prepared for the unexpected. "This was not going to be an election of business as usual," he said. "Very likely this was going to be an election where Americans would ask themselves, 'How did we get into this sorry mess?'
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2007 | Robert Lloyd, Times Staff Writer
With Sister Wendy Beckett back to living quietly in her trailer and Robert Hughes having moved on to the subject of himself, it has fallen to Simon Schama to lead the art-appreciation class this summer. Running Mondays through the end of July on KCET (at 9 tonight and moving to 10 p.m. next week), "Simon Schama's Power of Art" has an extension-course snap to it, the kind of thing from which you'd expect to learn something interesting without being especially taxed or worrying about grades.
NEWS
December 11, 2000 | MERLE RUBIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"As every English schoolboy knows . . ." Not long ago, this phrase was often used to introduce any well-known fact of British history, be it the Norman invasion of 1066 or the number of Henry VIII's wives. With all one hears of declining educational standards, the question of what schoolchildren know may have become more problematic. Unless, perhaps, they've been watching Simon Schama's BBC television series, "A History of Britain," which is also being aired in the U.S. on the History Channel.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2000 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The History Channel's ambitious six-hour miniseries "A History of England" is probably best enjoyed with scones, lemon curd and Earl Grey tea. Hosted by historian Simon Schama, the three-part series crosses three continents and hundreds of locations to bring Britain's colorful past to life.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2007 | Robert Lloyd, Times Staff Writer
With Sister Wendy Beckett back to living quietly in her trailer and Robert Hughes having moved on to the subject of himself, it has fallen to Simon Schama to lead the art-appreciation class this summer. Running Mondays through the end of July on KCET (at 9 tonight and moving to 10 p.m. next week), "Simon Schama's Power of Art" has an extension-course snap to it, the kind of thing from which you'd expect to learn something interesting without being especially taxed or worrying about grades.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2009 | Alicia Lozano
British historian Simon Schama never expected Barack Obama to so thoroughly wipe out the Democratic competition during primary season. But as he watched history unfold while filming his latest documentary "The American Future: A History," Schama prepared for the unexpected. "This was not going to be an election of business as usual," he said. "Very likely this was going to be an election where Americans would ask themselves, 'How did we get into this sorry mess?'
BOOKS
November 14, 1999 | SVETLANA ALPERS, Svetlana Alpers is the author of "The Art of Describing: Dutch Art in the Seventeenth Century" and "Rembrandt's Enterprise: The Studio and the Market." She is a visiting research professor in the department of fine arts at New York University
Why is it that Rembrandt's works continue to have a hold on our feelings and our imagination? It is largely a matter of a profound human engagement. His works make what is distant and strange--Amsterdam burghers and their wives, biblical figures, and Rembrandt himself--seem present and familiar, depicted in a most singular manner. So it is, that when one catches sight of a Rembrandt in a museum, one wants to confront it and, also, to be confronted by it.
BOOKS
April 16, 1995 | RICHARD EDER
Landscape is more than a nourishment that the earth provides to our imaginations. It is a nourishment that our imaginations provide to the earth. Against the extreme ecological notion of a primal state of wilderness sullied by human civilization, the historian Simon Schama writes: "The wilderness, after all, does not locate itself, does not name itself.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|