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November 21, 2012 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before the last-minute food run. The Skinny: Today's Morning Fix comes to you from our nation's capital, where it is crisp and cool. Remember Thanksgiving is about family, not about getting in line at Wal-Mart. Wednesday's headlines include a look at the holiday box office, a new deal for Time Warner Chief Executive Jeff Bewkes and a review of "Life of Pi. " Daily Dose: Dish Network subscribers in Los Angeles probably won't be seeing many Lakers games this season.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
When the Grammy nominations by the likes of Taylor Swift and Daft Punk were celebrated, in the quiet Spoken Word category , one publisher dominated: Hachette. Hachette took three out of five nominations, with one each going to Simon & Schuster and Macmillan. The Hachette nominees include David Sedaris' "Let's Explore Diabetes With Owls," his latest collection of nonfiction essays. Sedaris has been nominated for three Grammys before, but has never won. "Let's Explore Diabetes With Owls" is a bestseller.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Sexier than young adult books but not quite as extreme as "Fifty Shades of Grey": these are the books being called New Adult. New Adult is a buzzy new category for books geared toward readers -- mostly women -- who have grown out of young adult books and are ready for some romance. New Adult has a promising future, if it becomes an easy-to-recognize genre. In an effort to cement its presence -- and highlight its authors within it -- Simon & Schuster launched the Hot Bed on Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Sexier than young adult books but not quite as extreme as "Fifty Shades of Grey": these are the books being called New Adult. New Adult is a buzzy new category for books geared toward readers -- mostly women -- who have grown out of young adult books and are ready for some romance. New Adult has a promising future, if it becomes an easy-to-recognize genre. In an effort to cement its presence -- and highlight its authors within it -- Simon & Schuster launched the Hot Bed on Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Award-winning television show creator Shonda Rhimes will publish her first book in 2015 with Simon & Schuster, the publisher announced Wednesday. Rhimes, one of the leading women in television, will write about both her professional and family life. The as-yet-untitled book will be part memoir, part inspiration and part advice. “Simon and Schuster is crazy for giving me a book deal as I am clearly in no position to be handing out wisdom,” Rhimes said in the release about the book.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg
With the evolving story of David Petraeus' extramarital affair with biographer Paula Broadwell -- and the strange way it has come to light -- capturing Americans' attention, it's no surprise that Simon & Schuster has moved up the publication of its book about Petraeus, "The Insurgents: David Petraeus and the Plot to Change the American Way of War. " "The Insurgents" was set to be published Jan. 15. It will instead hit shelves Jan. 2, and include a...
NEWS
July 31, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg
A biography of Sally Ride, America's first female astronaut, will be published in 2013, Simon & Schuster announced Tuesday. Ride died at age 61 of pancreatic cancer just eight days ago. The as-yet-untitled book will be written by journalist Lynn Sherr, who spent more than 30 years with ABC News, covered the space shuttle program for ABC from 1981 to 1986 and got to know Ride through her work. Ride was not recruited to be an astronaut - she was one of 8,300 people who answered a want ad. After leaving the space program, Ride became involved in encouraging young women to study science.
BOOKS
April 13, 1986 | MAUREEN CONNELL
James (Jamie) Winslow Ricklehouse, a "translucently fair" 40-year-old woman is the witty narrator of Nora Johnson's formidable, fabulist tale about money and power--"for usually they go together." A Catholic, the daughter of a scion of a successful business, known simply as The Firm, she tells us what it was like being brought up in a privileged Manhattan family during the '50s and '60s.
BOOKS
November 1, 1987 | Sean Callahan
Thomas F. Crum is a master in the martial art of Aikido, which has the purpose of resolving ". . . physical conflict by making the attack harmless without doing harm even to the attacker." In this book, he describes the Aiki approach to life, which generalizes this goal to non-physical conflicts and also includes ". . . the blending and harmonizing aspart of daily life." Ai is Japanese for blending, and ki is the energy inherent in all things.
BOOKS
July 12, 1987 | Annie Gilbar
The words to describe Liz Carpenter's tale of her days as a political activist, White House insider, friend, wife, mother and writer may be trite--homespun, delightful, warm, touching, friendly and insightful--yet the book is anything but. This is not just another gossipy account of the life of a Washington veteran. Carpenter has always been a woman motivated and involved--whether it was as a journalist, an aide to Lyndon B.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Award-winning television show creator Shonda Rhimes will publish her first book in 2015 with Simon & Schuster, the publisher announced Wednesday. Rhimes, one of the leading women in television, will write about both her professional and family life. The as-yet-untitled book will be part memoir, part inspiration and part advice. “Simon and Schuster is crazy for giving me a book deal as I am clearly in no position to be handing out wisdom,” Rhimes said in the release about the book.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
Derek Jeter is already one of baseball's immortals. Once he finally retires from the game, the New York Yankee shortstop will be a shoo-in for a spot in the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, N.Y. He'll get a bronze plaque, in a spot not far from similar plaques honoring Babe Ruth and Jackie Robinson. But for Jeter, that's not quite enough of a legacy to leave behind. Soon he'll have his own publishing imprint too, with Simon & Schuster. One day, you'll be able to find Jeter's name repeated again and again on library and bookstore shelves.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Viral video sensation "The Fox" by Ylvis will be published as a picture book by Simon & Schuster. It will be available in time for Christmas. It may be the first children's book to come with "Based on the YouTube Sensation" emblazoned on its cover. "What Does the Fox Say?" has illustrations by Svein Nyhus; the text is from the lyrics by Ylvis, which does sound a lot like a children's book. "Dog goes woof / Cat goes meow.... What does the fox say?" What the fox says, of course, isn't like a children's book at all: "ding-ding-ding-geding-ding-ding," "wa-pa-pa-pa-pa-pa-pow," and so on (or something like that)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
Publisher Simon & Schuster is dropping the book by Dylan Davies, the man who served as a primary source for a discredited "60 Minutes" report on last year's attack on the U.S. mission in Benghazi, Lybia.  In his statements to CBS News' "60 Minutes" and in his recently published book, Davies claimed to give an eyewitness account of the terrorist attack that left a U.S. ambassador dead. But those versions contradicted an FBI  incident report that showed he was not there the night of the incident.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2013 | By August Brown
He's a rock god, television host , avant-garde pianist , feminine hygiene product endorser and record holder for longest drum performance . Now the one-man party maelstrom that is Andrew W.K. can add a new line to his C.V.: published author of an exquisite guide to his favorite activity. Which is partying, of course. Simon & Schuster picked up rights to "The Party Bible," W.K.'s new comprehensive book of motivational maxims and his metaphysics of partying. According to publisher Michael Szczerban, via the Onion A.V. Club , the book is “an unforgettable voyage in search of truth, wisdom, and party bliss ... every feeling will be permitted, every thought will become prophecy, and humanity's surging life force will be harnessed and ridden into the abyss.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2013 | By Elisabeth Donnelly
Joan Collins, the 80-year-old "Dynasty" star, reportedly asked to be removed from Shirley Jones' tell-all autobiography in a scene involving the offer of an orgy. Jones recently published "Shirley Jones: A Memoir. " In the book, the "Partridge Family" actress and Oscar-winner depicts a scene in which the young actresses and their then-husbands, Jack Cassidy and Anthony Newley, had dinner at Collins and Newley's Beverly Hills home in the late '60s. In the book, Jones writes that Collins, "who was wearing a low-cut something or other, seemed like an interesting woman.
BOOKS
December 20, 1987 | Frank Levering
"Divinity schools are weird places," writes Katharine Stall in "Den of Thieves," her tartly satiric, provocative, first novel. "They attract all kinds of people--idealists, street poets, burned-out stockbrokers, jailbirds' daughters, publicans, sinners, women taken in adultery. Radicals, too. . . ." The author knows whereof she speaks. A former student at New York's Union Theological Seminary, Stall draws from her own experience to create a pungent cast of current and ex-seminarians.
BOOKS
October 19, 1986 | Frank Levering, Levering is a writer and farmer who lives in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia. and
At the outset of this epic first novel, 30-year-old Guy Pehrsson, a transplanted Minnesota farm boy living the good life in Silicon Valley, receives a cryptic letter. Dated March 15, 1984, it reads in full: "Guy--Trouble here. Come home when you can. Sinceerly. (sic) Your grandfather, Helmer Pehrsson." "Trouble here." It is the full meaning of Helmer's typically laconic phrase that drives the plot and gives this novel its distinctive character.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Literary tourists traveling to New York have long been drawn to the Algonquin Hotel , the site of the famed Algonquin Roundtable. Full disclosure: "Literary tourists" include me -- I've been there more than once to have a martini in its lounge. The Algonquin was where a group of writers, wits and key literary figures met starting in 1919 to eat, argue and, of course, drink. Dorothy Parker, the petite poet with an acid pen and a hollow leg, was one of its stalwarts. So was Robert Benchley, one of his generation's most popular humorists; Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Edna Ferber; writer, editor and producer George S. Kaufman, winner of two Pulitzers; New York Times drama critic Alexander Woollcott; and Harold Ross, who, midway through the Roundtable's eight-year run, founded the New Yorker magazine.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2013 | By Nicole Sperling
Screenwriter Shane Salerno ("Savages," "Shaft") has spent close to a decade on a singular obsession: the reclusive late author J.D. Salinger. Now his work is finally coming to fruition. Via a flurry of deals the filmmaker struck in March with the Weinstein Co., PBS' "American Masters" and Simon & Schuster, his exhaustive work on the "Catcher in the Rye" author will debut in September. The Weinstein Co. on Thursday debuted the first trailer from "Salinger," the documentary about the mysterious writer, ahead of its Sept.
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