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Simon Wiesenthal

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2010
Simon Wiesenthal The Life and Legends Tom Segev Doubleday: 482 pp., $35
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2012 | By Mitchell Landsberg, Los Angeles Times
The Mormon Church apologized Tuesday for a "serious breach of protocol" after it was discovered that the parents of the late Nazi hunter Simon Wiesenthal were posthumously baptized as Mormons. The church also acknowledged that one of its members tried to baptize posthumously three relatives of Holocaust survivor Elie Wiesel. The efforts, at least in Wiesenthal's case, violated the terms of an agreement that the church signed in 1995, in which it agreed to stop baptizing Jewish victims of the Holocaust.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2005 | From Associated Press
Simon Wiesenthal, the Holocaust survivor who helped track down numerous Nazi war criminals after World War II, then spent the later decades of his life fighting anti-Semitism and prejudice against all people, died Tuesday, officials of the Simon Wiesenthal Center announced. He was 96. Wiesenthal died in his sleep at his home in Vienna, according to Rabbi Marvin Hier, the center's dean and founder. "I think he'll be remembered as the conscience of the Holocaust.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2011 | By Raja Abdulrahim, Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles-based Simon Wiesenthal Center announced this week that it has acquired a signed letter by Adolf Hitler advocating legal removal of Jews six years before the publication of "Mein Kampf. " The center, a Jewish human rights organization, hailed the purchase of what it called "one of the most important documents in the history of the Third Reich. " The four-page letter, dated Sept. 16, 1919, encouraged a systematic anti-Semitic approach rather than an emotional one. "Anti-semitism based on reason must lead to the systematic legal combating and removal of the rights of the Jew," Hitler wrote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1999 | MARVIN HIER, Rabbi Marvin Hier is the dean and founder of the Simon Wiesenthal Center and the Museum of Tolerance
I first met Simon Wiesenthal in the early 1960s when my wife and I visited him in Vienna. When the taxi driver heard where we were going, he grumbled, "Wiesenthal, a terrible man, always living in the past and looking under everybody's carpet." Wiesenthal grew up in Buczacz, Poland, in a religious family. When he was refused entry at the University of Lvov because of anti-Semitic quotas, he entered the University of Prague to study architecture.
NEWS
November 3, 2005 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
THE photo, slightly faded after eight decades, shows about a dozen boys looking out from a group. Their hair is short, their expressions serious, their uniforms likely uncomfortable on kids just edging into puberty. In the center, in parted hair and jacket and tie, is the leader of this troop of Boy Scouts in Poland. What none of them knew in 1923, when the photo was snapped, was that the boy and one other would be the only ones in the picture to survive the Holocaust.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2007 | Clare Aigner, Special to The Times
IN a snowy Berlin, where right-wing extremism is on the rise and skinheads linger, the long applause for the world premiere of "I Have Never Forgotten You: The Life and Legacy of Simon Wiesenthal," a documentary about the Nazi hunter who died in 2005, seemed especially poignant. "This is overwhelming; it is a great way for the film to start its new life," said Rick Trank, director of the documentary film unit of the Simon Wiesenthal Center in Los Angeles.
NEWS
April 26, 1990 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly 82, he walks slower these days, his back stoops and the skin sags around his pale blue eyes. It's time to sum up his life, he says, time to make a final reckoning of his work for the past 45 years. But if anyone thinks Simon Wiesenthal has given up his personal crusade to bring Nazi war criminals to justice, they are badly mistaken. "Maybe it's my craziness, because I will never stop," he says, the barest trace of a smile on his ghost-white face.
NEWS
August 5, 1999 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
A federal judge in New York announced Wednesday that she had appointed Simon Wiesenthal, the famed Nazi hunter, to head a special committee to decide how to distribute millions of dollars from a controversial settlement of Holocaust era claims against two Austrian banks.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1988 | DEBORAH CAULFIELD, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Ben Kingsley, who won an Oscar for his portrayal of humanitarian Mahatma Gandhi, has been cast to portray another great humanitarian, Nazi hunter Simon Wiesenthal in "Murderers Among Us: The Simon Wiesenthal Story," Home Box Office announced Monday. The project marks the first time Wiesenthal has permitted anyone to film his life story, according to HBO Pictures and Programming executive Rick Bieber. HBO will co-produce "Murderers" with Robert Cooper Productions and TV South.
OPINION
February 18, 2011 | By Marvin Hier
Sadly, there was no shortage of contenders in 2010 for the "Top 10 Anti-Semitic Slurs" list we put out at the Simon Wiesenthal Center each year. Taken together, the comments suggest that a bold new kind of anti-Semitism is emerging around the world. Our list of offenders includes a journalist, government leaders, a historian, a banker and even a prominent Hollywood director, all of them regurgitating the same worn-out themes that have led to hatred and bloodshed through the ages.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2010
Simon Wiesenthal The Life and Legends Tom Segev Doubleday: 482 pp., $35
OPINION
August 11, 2010
The Anti-Defamation League has opposed the construction of a $100-million Islamic community center, including a prayer room, two blocks from ground zero in Manhattan. The L.A.-based Simon Wiesenthal Center has taken the position that families of the nearly 3,000 victims of the 9/11 attacks should be allowed to decide whether the center should be built near "the greatest killing grounds in American history," because they suffered most directly from the Al Qaeda strike. Understandably, this is a difficult issue for Jewish organizations committed to the memory of the Holocaust, but their positions do not serve the causes of tolerance and anti-discrimination for which both groups claim to stand.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2010 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
A leading Jewish human rights organization says that comparing Arizona's tough new immigration law with Nazi Germany is "inappropriate and irresponsible." The Simon Wiesenthal Center in Los Angeles issued a statement this week expressing its opposition to the Arizona law but denouncing the use of language about the Holocaust, saying there was no need to "demonize opponents, even when they are mistaken, to those whose actions led to history's most notorious crime." "We don't need on top of everything else invoking imagery that is inappropriate," the center's associate dean, Rabbi Abraham Cooper, said Thursday in a phone interview from Jerusalem.
OPINION
February 12, 2010 | By Saree Makdisi
The Simon Wiesenthal Center's plan to construct an outpost of Los Angeles' Museum of Tolerance atop the most important Muslim cemetery in Jerusalem is temporarily in disarray. This presents an opportunity to call on the center to abandon this outrageous project once and for all. The site in question is Ma'man Allah, or the Mamilla Cemetery, which had been in continuous use for centuries until 1948, when hundreds of thousands of Palestinians were expelled or driven into flight and their private property, including Ma'man Allah, was handed over to Jewish users.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2009 | By Duke Helfand
The United States has secured more legal victories against suspected Nazi war criminals than any other country over the last eight years, but progress has slowed over the last year, according to a Jewish human rights organization in Los Angeles. The Simon Wiesenthal Center said in a new report that U.S. authorities have been responsible for 37 of 82 legal actions against suspected Nazis worldwide since 2001, when the organization began keeping statistics. The center's chief Nazi hunter, Efraim Zuroff, who graded more than three dozen countries on their efforts to prosecute Nazis, gave the United States an A despite a falloff in deportations and new investigations in the latest annual evaluation.
NEWS
April 23, 1989
Since his liberation from an Austrian concentration camp in 1945, Simon Wiesenthal has made a commitment to pursue the men responsible for the Holocaust. In "Murderers Among Us: The Simon Wiesenthal Story," Ben Kingsley portrays the famed Nazi hunter. Renee Soutendijk plays his wife and Craig T. Nelson is the American major who liberates Wiesenthal. Airing Sunday at 8 p.m. on cable's Home Box Office, the three-hour drama was written by Abby Mann, Robin Vote and Ron Hutchinson, and directed by Brian Gibson for executive producers Robert Cooper, Graham Benson and Mann.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Cyla Wiesenthal, the wife of famed Nazi hunter Simon Wiesenthal, has died, the chief rabbi in Vienna said Tuesday. She was 95. Rabbi Paul Chaim Eisenberg told the Austria Press Agency that Cyla Wiesenthal died Monday. The cause of death was not reported. Born Cyla Mueller in 1908, she and her future husband met as teenagers while attending secondary school in Buczacz, which was then part of the Austro-Hungarian province of Galicia but is now in Ukraine. They were married in 1936.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2008 | Martha Groves, Times Staff Writer
By the time U.S. troops liberated the Mauthausen concentration camp in Austria on May 5, 1945, Simon Wiesenthal was so weak from hunger and hard labor that he collapsed at their feet. Days later, the survivor of Buchenwald and other notorious camps found the strength to embark on what would become a lifelong quest: to bring to justice the major and minor Nazi killers who had exterminated 6 million of his fellow Jews and millions of Gypsies, Poles and other "inferior" peoples. For nearly half a century, Wiesenthal conducted much of his sleuthing from behind a darkly stained wooden desk in a compact Vienna office.
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