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ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1990 | JOHN DART, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
The head of West Germany and a Los Angeles rabbi have engaged in an unusual debate by mail about how to allay fears among Jews and others over the possibility that fascism could resurface in a united Germany. The exchange last month between West German Chancellor Helmut Kohl and Rabbi Marvin Hier, founder-dean of the Simon Wiesenthal Center, highlighted a grass-roots concern that has been largely ignored in the public discussions of political leaders.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2011 | By Raja Abdulrahim, Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles-based Simon Wiesenthal Center announced this week that it has acquired a signed letter by Adolf Hitler advocating legal removal of Jews six years before the publication of "Mein Kampf. " The center, a Jewish human rights organization, hailed the purchase of what it called "one of the most important documents in the history of the Third Reich. " The four-page letter, dated Sept. 16, 1919, encouraged a systematic anti-Semitic approach rather than an emotional one. "Anti-semitism based on reason must lead to the systematic legal combating and removal of the rights of the Jew," Hitler wrote.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2009 | By Duke Helfand
The United States has secured more legal victories against suspected Nazi war criminals than any other country over the last eight years, but progress has slowed over the last year, according to a Jewish human rights organization in Los Angeles. The Simon Wiesenthal Center said in a new report that U.S. authorities have been responsible for 37 of 82 legal actions against suspected Nazis worldwide since 2001, when the organization began keeping statistics. The center's chief Nazi hunter, Efraim Zuroff, who graded more than three dozen countries on their efforts to prosecute Nazis, gave the United States an A despite a falloff in deportations and new investigations in the latest annual evaluation.
OPINION
February 18, 2011 | By Marvin Hier
Sadly, there was no shortage of contenders in 2010 for the "Top 10 Anti-Semitic Slurs" list we put out at the Simon Wiesenthal Center each year. Taken together, the comments suggest that a bold new kind of anti-Semitism is emerging around the world. Our list of offenders includes a journalist, government leaders, a historian, a banker and even a prominent Hollywood director, all of them regurgitating the same worn-out themes that have led to hatred and bloodshed through the ages.
NEWS
September 6, 1991 | OSWALD JOHNSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lithuania's reported move to exonerate at least 1,000 people convicted of war crimes by Soviet courts violates an explicit agreement by the new government's chief prosecutor to exclude mass murder, genocide and other war crimes from any annulments of Soviet justice, the head of the Simon Wiesenthal Center said Thursday.
MAGAZINE
July 15, 1990 | SHELDON TEITELBAUM and TOM WALDMAN, Sheldon Teitelbaum, a frequent contributor to The Times, is an L.A. correspondent for Cinefantastique. Tom Waldman regularly covers Los Angeles politics for California Journal and other publications.
LAST YEAR, WHEN the Berlin Wall fell and the word reunification was murmured in the halls of power, the American Jewish community held its breath. Nobody had to be reminded of what happened to European Jewry the last time Germany was one. Reluctant to risk sparking world ire by opposing reunification while television transmitted dramatic pictures of the decimated Berlin Wall, most American Jews were content to let the British, French, Poles and Soviets express concern on their own behalf.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1991 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's not surprising that Madonna is in the middle of another controversy. But who would have ever thought she'd get into trouble for reading the Bible? A new version of the pop music vamp's top-selling single "Justify My Love"--called "The Beast Within Mix"--is being targeted by the Simon Wiesenthal Center for containing an allegedly anti-Semitic New Testament passage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2010 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
A leading Jewish human rights organization says that comparing Arizona's tough new immigration law with Nazi Germany is "inappropriate and irresponsible." The Simon Wiesenthal Center in Los Angeles issued a statement this week expressing its opposition to the Arizona law but denouncing the use of language about the Holocaust, saying there was no need to "demonize opponents, even when they are mistaken, to those whose actions led to history's most notorious crime." "We don't need on top of everything else invoking imagery that is inappropriate," the center's associate dean, Rabbi Abraham Cooper, said Thursday in a phone interview from Jerusalem.
BOOKS
April 21, 1985
The Simon Wiesenthal Center, as part of its ongoing research, is attempting to identify individuals who may have been helped in pre-World-War-II Austria by Dr. Muriel Gardiner, an American citizen who was studying medicine in Vienna in the 1930s and was involved with the anti-Fascist underground. She used the code name of Mary and offered her apartment as a safe house for individuals opposed to the Nazis. Anyone with information is asked to please contact Rabbi Abraham Cooper, Associate Dean, Simon Wiesenthal Center, 9760 W. Pico Blvd.
NEWS
November 24, 1989
Your R.S.V.P. column on the Simon Wiesenthal Center's Distinguished Sevice Award for the Performing Arts omitted the names of two of the center's honorees (View, Nov. 21). Also receiving the awards were producer Dick Berg for his film "Wallenberg: A Hero's Story" and Gerald Green, honored for his teleplays for both "Holocaust" and "Wallenberg: A Hero's Story." Both were most deserving of the honor. LYDIA TRIANTOPOULOS Director, Public Relations Simon Wiesenthal Center
OPINION
August 11, 2010
The Anti-Defamation League has opposed the construction of a $100-million Islamic community center, including a prayer room, two blocks from ground zero in Manhattan. The L.A.-based Simon Wiesenthal Center has taken the position that families of the nearly 3,000 victims of the 9/11 attacks should be allowed to decide whether the center should be built near "the greatest killing grounds in American history," because they suffered most directly from the Al Qaeda strike. Understandably, this is a difficult issue for Jewish organizations committed to the memory of the Holocaust, but their positions do not serve the causes of tolerance and anti-discrimination for which both groups claim to stand.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2010 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
A leading Jewish human rights organization says that comparing Arizona's tough new immigration law with Nazi Germany is "inappropriate and irresponsible." The Simon Wiesenthal Center in Los Angeles issued a statement this week expressing its opposition to the Arizona law but denouncing the use of language about the Holocaust, saying there was no need to "demonize opponents, even when they are mistaken, to those whose actions led to history's most notorious crime." "We don't need on top of everything else invoking imagery that is inappropriate," the center's associate dean, Rabbi Abraham Cooper, said Thursday in a phone interview from Jerusalem.
OPINION
February 12, 2010 | By Saree Makdisi
The Simon Wiesenthal Center's plan to construct an outpost of Los Angeles' Museum of Tolerance atop the most important Muslim cemetery in Jerusalem is temporarily in disarray. This presents an opportunity to call on the center to abandon this outrageous project once and for all. The site in question is Ma'man Allah, or the Mamilla Cemetery, which had been in continuous use for centuries until 1948, when hundreds of thousands of Palestinians were expelled or driven into flight and their private property, including Ma'man Allah, was handed over to Jewish users.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2009 | By Duke Helfand
The United States has secured more legal victories against suspected Nazi war criminals than any other country over the last eight years, but progress has slowed over the last year, according to a Jewish human rights organization in Los Angeles. The Simon Wiesenthal Center said in a new report that U.S. authorities have been responsible for 37 of 82 legal actions against suspected Nazis worldwide since 2001, when the organization began keeping statistics. The center's chief Nazi hunter, Efraim Zuroff, who graded more than three dozen countries on their efforts to prosecute Nazis, gave the United States an A despite a falloff in deportations and new investigations in the latest annual evaluation.
NEWS
November 15, 2009 | Efraim Zuroff, Efraim Zuroff, the Simon Wiesenthal Center's chief Nazi-hunter and director of its Israel office, is the author of "Operation Last Chance: One Man's Quest to Bring Nazi Criminals to Justice."
The envelope was postmarked Budapest, Aug. 25, 2004, and it arrived in my Jerusalem office about a week later. It contained more than a dozen yellowing pages detailing a decades-old murder in the Hungarian capital. According to witness statements included with the letter, Peter Balazs, an 18-year-old Jew, was tortured and beaten to death on Nov. 8, 1944, by Hungarian soldiers for not wearing the yellow star that Jews were required to wear. Two participants in the murder were prosecuted and convicted after the war, but according to the witnesses, a third alleged attacker, Karoly Zentai, was never charged.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2008 | Martha Groves, Times Staff Writer
By the time U.S. troops liberated the Mauthausen concentration camp in Austria on May 5, 1945, Simon Wiesenthal was so weak from hunger and hard labor that he collapsed at their feet. Days later, the survivor of Buchenwald and other notorious camps found the strength to embark on what would become a lifelong quest: to bring to justice the major and minor Nazi killers who had exterminated 6 million of his fellow Jews and millions of Gypsies, Poles and other "inferior" peoples. For nearly half a century, Wiesenthal conducted much of his sleuthing from behind a darkly stained wooden desk in a compact Vienna office.
WORLD
August 7, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.S. State Department said it would revise a portion of its website devoted to "background notes" on Germany after the Simon Wiesenthal Center said it minimized the Holocaust and Germany's role. The department's Bureau of European Affairs said there had been no intent to downplay the Holocaust. Rabbi Marvin Hier, founder and dean of the L.A.
NEWS
January 19, 1986
This is to clarify the many distortions contained in the letters (Times, Jan. 12) by Mr. and Mrs. Tony van Renterghem and Eva Mozes Kor in reference to the Mengele search and the Simon Wiesenthal Center. First, the Simon Wiesenthal Center did send Mr. and Mrs. van Renterghem to Porto Santo. Their report was carefully analyzed. They were immediately informed of the conclusion of one of the world's foremost intelligence agencies that the man in Porto Santo was not Dr. Josef Mengele.
WORLD
August 7, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.S. State Department said it would revise a portion of its website devoted to "background notes" on Germany after the Simon Wiesenthal Center said it minimized the Holocaust and Germany's role. The department's Bureau of European Affairs said there had been no intent to downplay the Holocaust. Rabbi Marvin Hier, founder and dean of the L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2007 | Clare Aigner, Special to The Times
IN a snowy Berlin, where right-wing extremism is on the rise and skinheads linger, the long applause for the world premiere of "I Have Never Forgotten You: The Life and Legacy of Simon Wiesenthal," a documentary about the Nazi hunter who died in 2005, seemed especially poignant. "This is overwhelming; it is a great way for the film to start its new life," said Rick Trank, director of the documentary film unit of the Simon Wiesenthal Center in Los Angeles.
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