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Simon Winchester

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December 12, 2010 | By Scott Martelle, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Atlantic Great Sea Battles, Heroic Discoveries, Titanic Storms, and a Vast Ocean of a Million Stories Simon Winchester HarperCollins: 512 pp., $27.99 One of the great joys of reading a Simon Winchester book is the inadvertent discovery of minutiae that is utterly useless, but also utterly fascinating. For example: The Rocky Mountain Triple Divide Peak in northern Montana "is the hyrdrologic apex of the North American continent," and the extreme western reach of the Atlantic Ocean.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2010 | By Scott Martelle, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Atlantic Great Sea Battles, Heroic Discoveries, Titanic Storms, and a Vast Ocean of a Million Stories Simon Winchester HarperCollins: 512 pp., $27.99 One of the great joys of reading a Simon Winchester book is the inadvertent discovery of minutiae that is utterly useless, but also utterly fascinating. For example: The Rocky Mountain Triple Divide Peak in northern Montana "is the hyrdrologic apex of the North American continent," and the extreme western reach of the Atlantic Ocean.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2004 | Michael J. Ybarra, Special to The Times
Simon WINCHESTER is watching Simon Winchester on TV. The bestselling author of "The Professor and the Madman" is spending three months here researching a book about the 1906 earthquake and fire that leveled the city. Two local filmmakers have been following him around, which sounds somewhat less interesting than spending a day watching a seismograph needle. Making a nonfiction book, after all, usually involves endless days alone in a library and at a computer.
BOOKS
June 15, 2008
-- Rankings are based on a Times poll of Southland bookstores. *--* Fiction weeks on list 1. The Host by Stephenie Meyer (Little, Brown: $25.99) A 4 woman refuses to give in to alien invaders who take over the minds, but not the bodies, of humans. 2. The Enchantress of Florence by Salman Rushdie (Random 1 House: $26) A European traveler arrives at the Mughal court with a beguiling tale to tell. 3. Bright Shiny Morning by James Frey (Harper: $26.95) Lives 3 intertwine across Los Angeles. 4.
BOOKS
June 15, 2008
-- Rankings are based on a Times poll of Southland bookstores. *--* Fiction weeks on list 1. The Host by Stephenie Meyer (Little, Brown: $25.99) A 4 woman refuses to give in to alien invaders who take over the minds, but not the bodies, of humans. 2. The Enchantress of Florence by Salman Rushdie (Random 1 House: $26) A European traveler arrives at the Mughal court with a beguiling tale to tell. 3. Bright Shiny Morning by James Frey (Harper: $26.95) Lives 3 intertwine across Los Angeles. 4.
NEWS
September 2, 1998 | RICHARD EDER, TIMES BOOK CRITIC
Among other products of Victorian expansiveness, such as bridges, railroads and colonial administrations set up under fiercely adverse conditions--not to mention 30-mile walks in fiercely uncomfortable shoes, and 10-course banquets--there was the painstaking, infinitely elaborate and supremely confident creation of the 12-volume Oxford English Dictionary.
BOOKS
May 11, 2003 | Kenneth Reich, Kenneth Reich is a staff writer for the Times.
Within 20 years around the turn of the 20th century occurred two of the most devastating and, to the local populations as well as experts of the fledgling science of volcanology, most surprising eruptions of modern times. First, on Aug. 27, 1883, Krakatoa blew up the entire 2,600-foot mountainous island upon which it sat in the Sunda Strait between the great islands of Sumatra and Java in the Indonesian archipelago.
BOOKS
October 19, 2003 | Robert McCrum, Robert McCrum is the literary editor of the Observer in London and the coauthor of "The Story of English."
The English language, brought to the shores of Britain by an obscure Germanic tribe, the Anglii, during the 5th century, is now roughly 1,500 years old. For the first 1,000 years of its existence it was forged by three invasions and a cultural revolution into the crafty hybrid described by Daniel Defoe as "your Roman-Saxon-Danish-Norman English."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2008 | Seth Faison, Special to The Times
Joseph NEEDHAM was a brilliant scholar who seemed to care about, and revel in, everything. A leading biochemist at Cambridge University, a flamboyant leftist, an accomplished linguist, Needham (1900-1995) had an intellectual range at age 25 that impressed colleagues so much that he was said to be on his way to becoming the Erasmus of the 20th century. One summer day in 1937, a knock came on his wooden door at Cambridge from the hand of a comely graduate student from China named Lu Gwei-djen.
NEWS
November 22, 1996 | ANTHONY DAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Halfway up the Yangtze with Simon Winchester, I realized I was learning a lot of Chinese history. I was also getting a feel for the realities of contemporary China. Once taken in hand, this book is hard to turn away from. Winchester, a seasoned writer with long experience in China, has hit another home run for British travel writers, who have dominated the travel-writing game for generations.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2008 | Seth Faison, Special to The Times
Joseph NEEDHAM was a brilliant scholar who seemed to care about, and revel in, everything. A leading biochemist at Cambridge University, a flamboyant leftist, an accomplished linguist, Needham (1900-1995) had an intellectual range at age 25 that impressed colleagues so much that he was said to be on his way to becoming the Erasmus of the 20th century. One summer day in 1937, a knock came on his wooden door at Cambridge from the hand of a comely graduate student from China named Lu Gwei-djen.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2004 | Michael J. Ybarra, Special to The Times
Simon WINCHESTER is watching Simon Winchester on TV. The bestselling author of "The Professor and the Madman" is spending three months here researching a book about the 1906 earthquake and fire that leveled the city. Two local filmmakers have been following him around, which sounds somewhat less interesting than spending a day watching a seismograph needle. Making a nonfiction book, after all, usually involves endless days alone in a library and at a computer.
BOOKS
October 19, 2003 | Robert McCrum, Robert McCrum is the literary editor of the Observer in London and the coauthor of "The Story of English."
The English language, brought to the shores of Britain by an obscure Germanic tribe, the Anglii, during the 5th century, is now roughly 1,500 years old. For the first 1,000 years of its existence it was forged by three invasions and a cultural revolution into the crafty hybrid described by Daniel Defoe as "your Roman-Saxon-Danish-Norman English."
BOOKS
May 11, 2003 | Kenneth Reich, Kenneth Reich is a staff writer for the Times.
Within 20 years around the turn of the 20th century occurred two of the most devastating and, to the local populations as well as experts of the fledgling science of volcanology, most surprising eruptions of modern times. First, on Aug. 27, 1883, Krakatoa blew up the entire 2,600-foot mountainous island upon which it sat in the Sunda Strait between the great islands of Sumatra and Java in the Indonesian archipelago.
BOOKS
September 30, 2001 | BRIAN J. SKINNER, Brian J. Skinner is the Eugene Higgins professor of geology and geophysics at Yale University and a former president of the Geological Society of America
William Smith is a familiar name to generations of geology students. His geological map of England, Wales and part of Scotland, published in 1815, was an astonishing achievement that earned him recognition as one of the founders of modern geology. Mt. Everest is another familiar name, but George Everest, for whom the mountain is named, and William Lambton, his predecessor as superintendent of the Great Trigonometric Survey of India, are known to few.
NEWS
September 2, 1998 | RICHARD EDER, TIMES BOOK CRITIC
Among other products of Victorian expansiveness, such as bridges, railroads and colonial administrations set up under fiercely adverse conditions--not to mention 30-mile walks in fiercely uncomfortable shoes, and 10-course banquets--there was the painstaking, infinitely elaborate and supremely confident creation of the 12-volume Oxford English Dictionary.
BOOKS
September 30, 2001 | BRIAN J. SKINNER, Brian J. Skinner is the Eugene Higgins professor of geology and geophysics at Yale University and a former president of the Geological Society of America
William Smith is a familiar name to generations of geology students. His geological map of England, Wales and part of Scotland, published in 1815, was an astonishing achievement that earned him recognition as one of the founders of modern geology. Mt. Everest is another familiar name, but George Everest, for whom the mountain is named, and William Lambton, his predecessor as superintendent of the Great Trigonometric Survey of India, are known to few.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2005 | From Associated Press
Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Doris Kearns Goodwin and novelists John Irving and Umberto Eco will be among the featured speakers at this year's national publishing convention, BookExpo America, to be held in New York in June. Goodwin will be promoting her upcoming biography of Abraham Lincoln, her first work since she acknowledged in 2002 that parts of her book "The Fitzgeralds and the Kennedys" were taken from another author without proper attribution.
NEWS
November 22, 1996 | ANTHONY DAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Halfway up the Yangtze with Simon Winchester, I realized I was learning a lot of Chinese history. I was also getting a feel for the realities of contemporary China. Once taken in hand, this book is hard to turn away from. Winchester, a seasoned writer with long experience in China, has hit another home run for British travel writers, who have dominated the travel-writing game for generations.
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