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February 28, 1989 | RICH ROBERTS, Times Staff Writer
Joe Simpson, one leg badly broken, was dangling helplessly above his doom in the Peruvian Andes, connected to life and his climbing partner, Simon Yates, by a 5/16-inch nylon line. Then Yates cut the rope to save his own life. That's the crux of the story Simpson survived to tell in his book, "Touching the Void" (Harper & Row, $17.95). Simpson touches a nerve of the mountaineering community and the hearts of others who agonize with both men.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2004 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
"We climbed because it was fun," Joe Simpson says, simply and directly. "And it was fun. It was just brilliant fun. And every now and then it went wildly wrong and then it wasn't." Wildly wrong turns out to be a rather mild description of what happened to Simpson and his fellow British climbing partner Simon Yates in the Peruvian Andes in 1985.
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NEWS
January 27, 2004 | Bob Sipchen, Times Staff Writer
The three questions Joe Simpson fields most often concern God, friendship and the life-or-death decision that in many ways made him the sort of character strangers walk up to and ask intimate, philosophical questions. So far, no one has asked him the question he finds most intriguing, says the British mountaineer, now 44.
NEWS
January 27, 2004 | Bob Sipchen, Times Staff Writer
The three questions Joe Simpson fields most often concern God, friendship and the life-or-death decision that in many ways made him the sort of character strangers walk up to and ask intimate, philosophical questions. So far, no one has asked him the question he finds most intriguing, says the British mountaineer, now 44.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2004 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
"We climbed because it was fun," Joe Simpson says, simply and directly. "And it was fun. It was just brilliant fun. And every now and then it went wildly wrong and then it wasn't." Wildly wrong turns out to be a rather mild description of what happened to Simpson and his fellow British climbing partner Simon Yates in the Peruvian Andes in 1985.
NEWS
December 2, 2004 | From Reuters
Mike Leigh's moving portrayal of a back-street abortionist in 1950s London swept the British Independent Film Awards late Tuesday, taking six awards, including best film and best director. "Vera Drake" also snared the best actress award for Imelda Staunton and best actor for Phil Davis.
NEWS
January 27, 2004 | Scott Doggett
Expedition leader Eric Simonson understands Simon Yates' decision to cut the rope, sending his climbing partner to what seemed like certain death. On May 27, 1994, Simonson radioed Mark Whetu and urged him to unclip himself from Michael Rheinberger -- blind and unable to walk -- and leave him tethered to a piton on steep terrain near the summit of Mt. Everest.
BUSINESS
February 3, 2000 | From Bloomberg News
Linux-related stocks jumped Wednesday after Linus Torvalds, creator of the much-hyped computer operating software that competes with Microsoft Corp.'s Windows, said a new version will be released at midyear. The new software, known as version 2.4, must be completed and checked for problems, Torvalds said at the LinuxWorld Conference & Expo in New York. An unofficial version will be released for testing in a couple of months, he said.
SPORTS
January 20, 2004 | Bill Dwyre
A consumer's guide to the best and worst of sports media and merchandise. Ground rules: If it can be read, heard, observed, viewed, dialed or downloaded, it's in play here. One exception: No products will be endorsed. What: "Touching the Void." When: Scheduled to be released Feb. 6. For that small but fervent group of people who climb mountains or read about those who do, Joe Simpson's 1988 book "Touching the Void" is the bible.
SPORTS
October 29, 1997 | BILL DWYRE
What: "Dark Shadows Falling," Jonathan Cape Publishers, London, $24.95. In 1985, British climber Joe Simpson, on a descent with partner Simon Yates from the peak of Siula Grande in Peru, fell and injured himself badly. Yates attempted to get Simpson down by lowering him, slowly, by rope. But that also met with disaster when, in a blinding, deafening snowstorm, Yates lowered Simpson over the edge and had to cut him loose or he would have been pulled over too.
SPORTS
February 28, 1989 | RICH ROBERTS, Times Staff Writer
Joe Simpson, one leg badly broken, was dangling helplessly above his doom in the Peruvian Andes, connected to life and his climbing partner, Simon Yates, by a 5/16-inch nylon line. Then Yates cut the rope to save his own life. That's the crux of the story Simpson survived to tell in his book, "Touching the Void" (Harper & Row, $17.95). Simpson touches a nerve of the mountaineering community and the hearts of others who agonize with both men.
SPORTS
May 7, 2001 | From Associated Press
David Toms rewarded his cheering hometown fans with a birdie on the 18th hole to wrap up an eight-under-par 64 and a two-stroke victory in the Compaq Classic Sunday at New Orleans. "When I made the putt on the last hole it was pretty loud. The guy in the scorers tent said, 'Man, that was a roar,' " Toms said. ". . . But I was screaming myself." Toms, who finished at 22-under 266, birdied the first hole then finished the front nine at two under, offsetting a bogey on No. 5 with two more birdies.
SPORTS
May 24, 2001 | From Staff Reports
Charlie Wi of North Hills sank a seven-foot birdie putt on the seventh playoff hole to win the $300,000 SK Telecom Open on Sunday at Seoul. Wi, a graduate of Westlake High and the 1990 California Amateur champion, beat Kang Wook-Soon of South Korea. Kang holed a pitch shot for eagle on the sixth extra hole, but Wi prolonged the playoff by sinking a five-foot eagle putt.
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