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Simone De Beauvoir

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April 14, 1986 | Associated Press
Simone de Beauvoir, one of France's leading literary figures and lifelong companion of the late existentialist philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre, died today at a Paris hospital. She was 78. She wrote the international best seller "The Second Sex," published in 1949 and regarded as a foundation stone of the women's liberation movement worldwide. She was an ardent champion of women's rights and a fundamental philosopher of the movement.
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BOOKS
December 11, 2005 | Heller McAlpin, Heller McAlpin is a regular contributor to Book Review and other publications.
"TeTE-a-Tete," Hazel Rowley's compulsively readable account of the lifelong relationship between Jean-Paul Sartre (1905-1980) and Simone de Beauvoir (1908-86), is the surprise page-turner of the season. Their sexual high jinks make the stuff of tabloids seem tame and conventional by comparison. As Rowley states at the outset, her book is neither a full-scale biography of the two most famous French writers and existentialists of the 20th century nor a study of their work.
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NEWS
June 28, 1990 | ELIZABETH VENANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The idea zings out over the Hollywood Hills like an awry Frisbee. Industry insiders clustered around Deirdre Bair rock with laughter. The hostesses, Marcia Nassitir and Anne Goursaud, are stunned. Nassitir (producer of "The Big Chill") and Goursaud (editor of "The Two Jakes") have optioned Bair's new biography, "Simone de Beauvoir," and are throwing one of La-La Land's more cerebral thirst-quenchers up on the cloud-high terrace of a mountain adobe.
BOOKS
October 18, 1998 | VIVIAN GORNICK, Vivian Gornick is the author, most recently, of "The End of the Novel of Love," a collection of critical essays
Simone de Beauvoir came to the United States for the first time in the winter of 1947 (the trip is described in her book "America Day by Day"). Passing through Chicago on her way to California, having been given his number by a casual acquaintance, she called Nelson Algren--left-leaning, working-class, tough-guy American writer--and spent an evening with him touring the city's low-life neighborhoods, at the end of which they fell into bed.
BOOKS
October 18, 1998 | VIVIAN GORNICK, Vivian Gornick is the author, most recently, of "The End of the Novel of Love," a collection of critical essays
Simone de Beauvoir came to the United States for the first time in the winter of 1947 (the trip is described in her book "America Day by Day"). Passing through Chicago on her way to California, having been given his number by a casual acquaintance, she called Nelson Algren--left-leaning, working-class, tough-guy American writer--and spent an evening with him touring the city's low-life neighborhoods, at the end of which they fell into bed.
BOOKS
October 18, 1998 | CLANCY SIGAL, Clancy Sigal, a screenwriter, is the author of four novels, including "Going Away" and "The Secret Defector."
" . . . a place of my own to live in, with a woman of my own and perhaps a child of my own. There's nothing extraordinary about wanting such things. . . ." So wrote Nelson Algren to Simone de Beauvoir when he feared that their love affair was, in her words, "doomed to come to an end, and soon." Neither wanted it to die. Both had plunged madly and sexually in love on her first trip to America in 1947. Their tragedy was that they chose work, and their respective cities over love.
BOOKS
May 24, 1992 | Jerome Charyn, Charyn is a novelist and critic who lives in Paris and New York. His latest novel, "Maria's Girls," is just out from Mysterious Press.
Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir are icons that won't go away. He was our last great philosophe , and she was the most adored feminist of her time. They both grew famous after World War II with the "wild success of existentialism" and its belief that women and men had their own "gift of fate" in a lonely, mechanized universe. They were comrades, lovers, friends, with a "little morganatic marriage," where each of them had other liaisons. As Beauvoir was bisexual, she and Sartre shared the same "mistress" more than once.
BOOKS
December 11, 2005 | Heller McAlpin, Heller McAlpin is a regular contributor to Book Review and other publications.
"TeTE-a-Tete," Hazel Rowley's compulsively readable account of the lifelong relationship between Jean-Paul Sartre (1905-1980) and Simone de Beauvoir (1908-86), is the surprise page-turner of the season. Their sexual high jinks make the stuff of tabloids seem tame and conventional by comparison. As Rowley states at the outset, her book is neither a full-scale biography of the two most famous French writers and existentialists of the 20th century nor a study of their work.
BOOKS
April 15, 1990 | RICHARD EDER
Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir were sometime lovers, lifelong companions and literary and political collaborators. In her vigorous and deeply researched biography of Beauvoir, Deirdre Bair advances and argues with a recurrent image. Sartre as statue, Beauvoir as pedestal: Bair struggles with the problem of detaching them. Through the '40s and '50s, when existentialism was the most vital intellectual current in France, Sartre was its field marshal and Beauvoir was chief of staff.
BOOKS
July 5, 1987 | Helene Vivienne Wenzel, Wenzel interviewed De Beauvoir in 1984. She is the editor of "Simone de Beauvoir: Witness to a Century" (Yale University Press, 1987).
Who is Simone de Beauvoir that her life and love story should command our attention for about 400 pages of text, including extensive bibliographies, myriad footnotes and a seemingly cosmic index? For starters, fresh on the heels of the May, 1968, student-worker revolution in Paris, in which she took a very active and supportive role at age 60, De Beauvoir emerged as an international figure in the second wave of feminism.
BOOKS
October 18, 1998 | CLANCY SIGAL, Clancy Sigal, a screenwriter, is the author of four novels, including "Going Away" and "The Secret Defector."
" . . . a place of my own to live in, with a woman of my own and perhaps a child of my own. There's nothing extraordinary about wanting such things. . . ." So wrote Nelson Algren to Simone de Beauvoir when he feared that their love affair was, in her words, "doomed to come to an end, and soon." Neither wanted it to die. Both had plunged madly and sexually in love on her first trip to America in 1947. Their tragedy was that they chose work, and their respective cities over love.
BOOKS
May 24, 1992 | Jerome Charyn, Charyn is a novelist and critic who lives in Paris and New York. His latest novel, "Maria's Girls," is just out from Mysterious Press.
Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir are icons that won't go away. He was our last great philosophe , and she was the most adored feminist of her time. They both grew famous after World War II with the "wild success of existentialism" and its belief that women and men had their own "gift of fate" in a lonely, mechanized universe. They were comrades, lovers, friends, with a "little morganatic marriage," where each of them had other liaisons. As Beauvoir was bisexual, she and Sartre shared the same "mistress" more than once.
NEWS
June 28, 1990 | ELIZABETH VENANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The idea zings out over the Hollywood Hills like an awry Frisbee. Industry insiders clustered around Deirdre Bair rock with laughter. The hostesses, Marcia Nassitir and Anne Goursaud, are stunned. Nassitir (producer of "The Big Chill") and Goursaud (editor of "The Two Jakes") have optioned Bair's new biography, "Simone de Beauvoir," and are throwing one of La-La Land's more cerebral thirst-quenchers up on the cloud-high terrace of a mountain adobe.
BOOKS
April 15, 1990 | RICHARD EDER
Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir were sometime lovers, lifelong companions and literary and political collaborators. In her vigorous and deeply researched biography of Beauvoir, Deirdre Bair advances and argues with a recurrent image. Sartre as statue, Beauvoir as pedestal: Bair struggles with the problem of detaching them. Through the '40s and '50s, when existentialism was the most vital intellectual current in France, Sartre was its field marshal and Beauvoir was chief of staff.
BOOKS
July 5, 1987 | Helene Vivienne Wenzel, Wenzel interviewed De Beauvoir in 1984. She is the editor of "Simone de Beauvoir: Witness to a Century" (Yale University Press, 1987).
Who is Simone de Beauvoir that her life and love story should command our attention for about 400 pages of text, including extensive bibliographies, myriad footnotes and a seemingly cosmic index? For starters, fresh on the heels of the May, 1968, student-worker revolution in Paris, in which she took a very active and supportive role at age 60, De Beauvoir emerged as an international figure in the second wave of feminism.
NEWS
April 14, 1986 | Associated Press
Simone de Beauvoir, one of France's leading literary figures and lifelong companion of the late existentialist philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre, died today at a Paris hospital. She was 78. She wrote the international best seller "The Second Sex," published in 1949 and regarded as a foundation stone of the women's liberation movement worldwide. She was an ardent champion of women's rights and a fundamental philosopher of the movement.
MAGAZINE
October 13, 1991
If being a song girl is indeed a position of status, I would remind everyone that, as Simone de Beauvoir once remarked, a pedestal, like a prison, is a tiny place. LILLIAN H. JONES Los Angeles
MAGAZINE
March 22, 1992
The story on Paglia was an enlightening read, as is her book "Sexual Personae." Not since Simone de Beauvoir's "The Mandarins" has such a powerful, productive book come along. As an instructor in creative writing, I plan to place Paglia's masterpiece at the top of my required reading lists. DOUGLAS MUIR INSTRUCTOR/ CONSULTANT UCLA EXTENSION WRITING PROGRAM
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