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Simone Forti

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October 20, 2007 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
The older she gets, the younger she seems. That would be irrepressible postmodern dancer-choreographer Simone Forti, a gamin-like septuagenarian who beguiles with her tiny voice, lived-in face, vivid movements and captivating tales. Above all, Forti is a master storyteller, one whose body channels spoken word and thought, the past and present, as a way to live in the world. In so doing, she becomes that world.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2012 | By Jori Finkel
A jury set up to review the work of 60 artists in the Hammer Museum's “Made in L.A.” biennial, produced this year with LAX Art, has selected five finalists for a new $100,000 prize. The artists up for the Mohn Award are: Simone Forti, Liz Glynn, Meleko Mokgosi, Erika Vogt and Slanguage (the husband-and-wife team consisting of Mario Ybarra Jr and Karla Diaz). Anyone who watches "American Idol" knows the process: Judges choose the pool of candidates and viewers choose the winner.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2006 | Susan Josephs, Special to The Times
AT 71, Simone Forti can still turn a mean backward somersault. She knows just the right way to crawl around the floor while discoursing on slavery. Better than most people, she can simultaneously wave her legs in the air and launch into a riff about the Milky Way. The time has come, she says, for a greater artistic challenge.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2012 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
This post has been corrected. See note at the bottom for details. Timing isn't everything, but it is something, and the timing of the new Hammer Museum biennial couldn't be better. Having spent much of the last year looking at L.A. art made by post-World War II generations that laid the groundwork for the city's explosive cultural ripening in the 1980s, via the multiple-museum extravaganza that was Pacific Standard Time, now we get a cross-section of recent art made a generation later.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1998 | VICTORIA LOOSELEAF
Wild garlic, tiny red ants and sumac all belong to the unadulterated world of Simone Forti. A postmodern improvisational dance diva, Forti enlivened the stage of Highways Performance Space on Friday with "logomotion," an evening of four works incorporating movement and spoken word. But wait. Was it possible that earth goddess Forti, lying prone on a trio of bamboo poles, was also talking about, of all things, the impeachment hearings? Precisely. And nothing seemed more, well, Fortian.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1993 | LEWIS SEGAL
One of the subtlest postmodern innovators a quarter-century ago, Simone Forti brought to improvisational dance not only an analytical intelligence and a talent for movement expression, but a visionary integration of culture with nature.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2000 | VICTORIA LOOSELEAF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
While Howard Stern touts his latest game-show segment in which listeners vie to win dates with porn stars, and Fox TV has strangers marrying each other for looks and big bucks, Highways presented "Love Fest," two different benefit performances over the weekend. Curated by Dan Froot, Victoria Marks and Conor McTeague, the evenings included the pairing of artists from different disciplines, or "first dates."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2004 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
Anyone attending "An Evening of Dance With Yvonne Rainer and Simone Forti" on Saturday at the Getty Center and expecting a pleasant trip down memory lane was in for quite a jolt. The eight works, almost all created in the 1960s, retained an astonishing immediacy and impact. The dances were conceived in a period during which choreographers, composers and visual artists rejected traditions to find -- and redefine -- the basics of their art.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 1986 | LEWIS SEGAL, Times Dance Writer
At 50, Simone Forti remains committed to organic dancing: movement in harmony with nature. At a time when her generation of back-to-basics dance rebels has largely sold out to spectacle and virtuosity, it is reassuring to find that she still holds to the purity of her original vision with no loss in freshness or insight.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1998 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
Scattering sections of The Times across the stage of Highways Performance Space in Santa Monica on Sunday, postmodern matriarch Simone Forti scans them with a flashlight and walks on them as if they were steppingstones to some undetermined destination--"maybe Hawaii," she says. She then arranges them to suggest global land masses--"Let's make the Persian Gulf here"--and traces "the estuary of the Tigris and Euphrates" from the stage floor up through her body onto the back wall and ceiling.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2007 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
The older she gets, the younger she seems. That would be irrepressible postmodern dancer-choreographer Simone Forti, a gamin-like septuagenarian who beguiles with her tiny voice, lived-in face, vivid movements and captivating tales. Above all, Forti is a master storyteller, one whose body channels spoken word and thought, the past and present, as a way to live in the world. In so doing, she becomes that world.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2006 | Susan Josephs, Special to The Times
AT 71, Simone Forti can still turn a mean backward somersault. She knows just the right way to crawl around the floor while discoursing on slavery. Better than most people, she can simultaneously wave her legs in the air and launch into a riff about the Milky Way. The time has come, she says, for a greater artistic challenge.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2004 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
Anyone attending "An Evening of Dance With Yvonne Rainer and Simone Forti" on Saturday at the Getty Center and expecting a pleasant trip down memory lane was in for quite a jolt. The eight works, almost all created in the 1960s, retained an astonishing immediacy and impact. The dances were conceived in a period during which choreographers, composers and visual artists rejected traditions to find -- and redefine -- the basics of their art.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2004 | Sasha Anawalt, Special to The Times
Fresh winds. New people. New movement. New choreography." Those were the opening lines of a review in March 1962 by Jill Johnston, who covered dance and art for New York's Village Voice from 1959 to 1968. Johnston was extremely personal, often describing the process of how she saw something and allowing herself, in the words of current Voice dance critic Deborah Jowitt, to be "devoured by art."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2000 | VICTORIA LOOSELEAF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
While Howard Stern touts his latest game-show segment in which listeners vie to win dates with porn stars, and Fox TV has strangers marrying each other for looks and big bucks, Highways presented "Love Fest," two different benefit performances over the weekend. Curated by Dan Froot, Victoria Marks and Conor McTeague, the evenings included the pairing of artists from different disciplines, or "first dates."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1998 | VICTORIA LOOSELEAF
Wild garlic, tiny red ants and sumac all belong to the unadulterated world of Simone Forti. A postmodern improvisational dance diva, Forti enlivened the stage of Highways Performance Space on Friday with "logomotion," an evening of four works incorporating movement and spoken word. But wait. Was it possible that earth goddess Forti, lying prone on a trio of bamboo poles, was also talking about, of all things, the impeachment hearings? Precisely. And nothing seemed more, well, Fortian.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 1986 | CRAIG BROMBERG
One day, some years ago, the choreographer Simone Forti went to the Bronx Zoo to observe a herd of Pere David deer, recent imports from China. A fawn had been born just two hours earlier and as Forti was watching she saw the biggest member of the herd thunder across the plain, charging at the newborn fawn. "He leaped straight into the air, right in front of the baby and landed right where he had jumped up and then went trotting off," she recently recalled.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2012 | By Jori Finkel
A jury set up to review the work of 60 artists in the Hammer Museum's “Made in L.A.” biennial, produced this year with LAX Art, has selected five finalists for a new $100,000 prize. The artists up for the Mohn Award are: Simone Forti, Liz Glynn, Meleko Mokgosi, Erika Vogt and Slanguage (the husband-and-wife team consisting of Mario Ybarra Jr and Karla Diaz). Anyone who watches "American Idol" knows the process: Judges choose the pool of candidates and viewers choose the winner.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1998 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
Scattering sections of The Times across the stage of Highways Performance Space in Santa Monica on Sunday, postmodern matriarch Simone Forti scans them with a flashlight and walks on them as if they were steppingstones to some undetermined destination--"maybe Hawaii," she says. She then arranges them to suggest global land masses--"Let's make the Persian Gulf here"--and traces "the estuary of the Tigris and Euphrates" from the stage floor up through her body onto the back wall and ceiling.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1993 | LEWIS SEGAL
One of the subtlest postmodern innovators a quarter-century ago, Simone Forti brought to improvisational dance not only an analytical intelligence and a talent for movement expression, but a visionary integration of culture with nature.
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